Bonsai landscape – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 03:27:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Bonsai landscape – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Things to do: October 2022 | https://rgbonsai.com/things-to-do-october-2022/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 20:25:57 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/things-to-do-october-2022/ In your garden It’s fall, so you can plant, plant, plant! You can plant all kinds of perennials like penstemon, globe mallow, salvias, etc. This time of year is the best time to plant trees – both native and non-native. Get ready for fall planting in your vegetable garden! If you want to grow bulbs […]]]>

In your garden

  • It’s fall, so you can plant, plant, plant!
    • You can plant all kinds of perennials like penstemon, globe mallow, salvias, etc.
    • This time of year is the best time to plant trees – both native and non-native.
    • Get ready for fall planting in your vegetable garden!
    • If you want to grow bulbs like daffodils, tulips, lilies, irises and amaryllis, you can plant them now. If you are already growing irises, now is the time to divide them.
  • New plantings can follow this watering schedule from Pima County Master Gardeners for newly planted native and desert-adapted plants:
    • 1-2 weeks every 3-4 days;
    • 3 -4 weeks every 6-7 days,
    • 5-6 weeks, every 7-10 days,
    • 7-8 weeks, every 10-14 days.
    • After week 8, gradually extend the time between irrigations until plants are established.

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  • You can replenish the compost on your plants. If you don’t know how make your own compostit can be purchased at Tank’s Green Stuff. You can also use vermicompost or worm castings for additional nutrition.
  • You can prune your Texas Rangers after our rains stop – they won’t bloom again until next year. Alternatively, you can wait until around February.

Events

Watershed Management Group:

• The Tucson Botanical Gardens are open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

  • Archeology Day. September 24, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Free with a suggested donation of $5 at the entrance to the garden. 946 W. Mission Lane.

• Do you have milkweed in your garden? Want to help monitor monarch butterflies in Arizona? Check out this great citizen science project through the Desert Botanical Garden and the USA National Phenology Network.

• Check out some great videos on our desert and plant related topics on the Tumamoc Hill YouTube Channel.

• Don’t forget the free guided tours of the Master Gardener demonstration gardens at 4210 N. Campbell Avenue Wednesdays and Saturdays at 9 a.m. You can also walk alone if you prefer.

Pima County Master Gardener Virtual Lectures. There are plenty of interesting topics for everyone, whether you’re brand new to Tucson or a seasoned gardener.

Support

Grow with us! Support our efforts by subscribing to the Arizona Daily Star.

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Shanta Lifestyle Limited and Gruppo Euromobil: a successful partnership https://rgbonsai.com/shanta-lifestyle-limited-and-gruppo-euromobil-a-successful-partnership/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:37:12 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/shanta-lifestyle-limited-and-gruppo-euromobil-a-successful-partnership/ Gruppo Euromobil, designed in Italy in 1972, is a specialist in contemporary furniture for the home and contract. The company immediately became famous for its technological investments which created a perfect balance between design, quality and affordability. The Group consists of three brands – Euromobil, Zalf and Désirée – all inspired by the same state-of-the-art […]]]>

Gruppo Euromobil, designed in Italy in 1972, is a specialist in contemporary furniture for the home and contract. The company immediately became famous for its technological investments which created a perfect balance between design, quality and affordability. The Group consists of three brands – Euromobil, Zalf and Désirée – all inspired by the same state-of-the-art production philosophy, combining craftsmanship with extremely innovative, flexible and versatile manufacturing systems.

Euromobil is the first company of the Group, founded in 1972. It produces timeless kitchen collections for which all aspects of quality are absolute values. Zalf was founded in 1974 and soon became part of Gruppo. The brand designs living rooms, sleeping areas, children’s and teenagers’ bedrooms, office compositions in a warm and distinctive way. Désirée has been part of the Euromobil family since 1995. Désirée manufactures sofas, armchairs, beds and complementary elements such as rugs and poufs in line with the “Home soft home” design philosophy, i.e. say a particular approach to interpret and recreate the welcome and friendly atmosphere typical of the house.

Désirée’s unique and world-renowned pieces are made by designers like Roberto Gobbo, Marc Sadler, Matteo Thun & Antonio Rodriguez, Setsu & Shinobu Ito e Jai Jalan with attention to detail and production quality, guaranteeing excellence and practicality. .

Shanta Lifestyle Limited has collaborated with Gruppo Euromobil to bring all of its world famous brands exclusively to Bangladesh.

Shanta Lifestyle aims to meet the burgeoning home decor needs of Bangladeshi consumers who seek pragmatic and exclusive design solutions. It was created to provide a one-stop solution for all interior design needs and set standards in this landscape. The partnership with Gruppo Euromobil demonstrates this ambition.

The Experience Center is located on the second floor of the Shanta Forum in Tejgaon and features Desiree and Zalf’s popular products – which are also available on her website, shantalifestyle.com. This website highlights other brands available from Shanta Lifestyle and offers customization using Augmented Reality (AR) to allow consumers to view different changes in real time.

The store has designated areas, which should mimic certain spaces in a home. The first area that is sure to catch the eye of its visitors is the living space. The space includes Roberto Gobbo’s Kubic sofa. This rectangular, compact and plush sofa welcomes visitors with warmth and comfort. The Kubic in its fabric finish can turn into a full size bed when the need arises.

The Kubic is coordinated with the Ludwig sofa, also designed by Roberto Gobbo. The sofa has no armrests or legrests and is covered with removable leather upholstery. The body of the sofa is made of metal. The design of the Ludwig ensures versatility and flexibility. The Ludwig can fit into any living space, adding to the aesthetic and sparking curiosity. Next to the sofa rests the Koster armchair by Marc Sadler. This one has a deconstructed shape inspired by the 50s, harmonizing and complementing the seating arrangement. The set is completed with the Sabi tables by Setsu & Shinobu Ito, which feature a range of center and side tables to add color and contrast to the overall living space. The larger, dark brown Sabi is accompanied by the side table variant in white, creating a pleasant contrast of shades.

Going deeper into the exhibition room, we discover a nocturnal installation. The Shellon bed is in the center, designed by Setsu & Shinobu Ito, which stays true to Desiree’s motto of being soft, and conveys welcoming emotion to visitors. The bed rests on its slender metal legs to create a floating feel invoking lightweight appeal. The bed is flanked by the coffee table — Stum also by Setsu & Shinobu Ito. The minimalist design of the metal body is highlighted by its ease of use. Right next to the bed rests the armchair, Kara designed by Marc Sadler, which is clean and elegant, accented by walnut bronze. The wooden structured armchair has a swivel and an ottoman, making it the perfect companion for relaxing. The set is completed with the side table, Yori by Setsu & Shinobu Ito, and is a tribute to Japanese bonsai. The gold finish and reflective glass top are essential for storing books.

Then there is the Zalf area, which has four different areas for children of different age groups. The Z773, Z780, Z781 and Z784 solutions are all designed to provide everything a child or teenager needs in their room. Different rooms are in different colors and have beds, desks, wardrobes and a wall bookcase. All configurations can be customized and adjusted to your liking after consultation with representatives.

Shanta Lifestyle Limited also offers state-of-the-art kitchen solutions from Euromobil that offer world-renowned modularity, charm and flexibility. The solutions can be used through consultations at Shanta Lifestyle.

Photo: Bayezid Bin Waheed

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Getting out of the perfectionist trap with the “wabi sabi” philosophy https://rgbonsai.com/getting-out-of-the-perfectionist-trap-with-the-wabi-sabi-philosophy/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/getting-out-of-the-perfectionist-trap-with-the-wabi-sabi-philosophy/ I’m a bit of a perfectionist. I plan a vacation to a T, my mind replays the goofs on repeat, and the thought that there might be typos in my articles clenches my jaw with restlessness. Okay, maybe more than a “little”. The thing is, I know I shouldn’t be like this. The pursuit of […]]]>

I’m a bit of a perfectionist. I plan a vacation to a T, my mind replays the goofs on repeat, and the thought that there might be typos in my articles clenches my jaw with restlessness. Okay, maybe more than a “little”.

The thing is, I know I shouldn’t be like this. The pursuit of perfection is not synonymous with striving for excellence or even for what is worth it, and whether this motivation is self-motivated or imposed by a boss, parent or partner, its cost far exceeds the target. Studies have shown the potential fallout perfectionism: anxiety, depression, social aversion, decreased life satisfaction, decreased self-esteem and difficulties with emotional self-regulation.

Even knowing this, I have a hard time accepting my shortcomings and accepting my mistakes. And unfortunately, I am not alone. Perfectionism has been increasing over time. The college students and workers in various fields have perfectionist impulses. To escape this self-set trap, I explored the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which not only asks us to accept that nothing and no one is perfect; he begs us to go further and find the value of the imperfect.

Wabi-sabi can mean many things, such as humility, imperfect beauty, and the impermanence of all things. (Credit: JordyMeow/ Pixabay)

What is wabi-sabi?

As is often the case with cross-cultural borrowings, there is no individual translation for wabi-sabi In English. Again, there is no clear definition in his mother tongue either. Like Andrew Juniper, author of Wabi Sabi: the Japanese art of impermanenceRemarks:

“Wabi sabi is an aesthetic philosophy so intangible and so shrouded in centuries of mystery that even the most ambitious Japanese scholars would give it wide prominence and uphold the Japanese tradition of speaking of it only in the most poetic terms.”

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So, in the spirit of wabi-sabiI will try my best.

The phrase collect two kanji charactersyou might have guessed: wabi (侘) and sabi (寂). Wabi has been variously translated as “simplicity”, “melancholy” or “gaze of the serene”. Sabi is translated as “old and elegant”, “tranquility” or “the beauty of faded things”. Taken together, they express an appreciation for humility, imperfect beauty, and the impermanence of all things. And even though I called it a philosophy, it’s actually more of a worldview or an aesthetic – something you feel and experience – than a philosophy structured and formulated in the Western tradition.

That said, its roots find solid ground in the philosophy of Zen Buddhism. According to Juniper, at various times in Japanese history, Buddhist temples would be underfunded, but still had to welcome guests in a spirit of generosity. Lacking art or high-quality furnishings, the monks paired their simplistic personal effects with a natural setting to “achieve an aesthetic effect”.

“In doing so, they focused on the natural, the impermanent and the humble, and in these simple and often rustic objects they discovered the innate beauty found in the exquisite random patterns left by the flow of light. nature,” Juniper writes.

"pines" by Hasegawa Tohaku

Hasegawa Tohaku’s “Pine Trees”, a six-panel room divider, uses negative space to accentuate elements such as natural simplicity. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Until an art

I don’t want to paint with too broad a cultural brush. At different periods in Japanese history, Buddhist temples could wield considerable political and social power, providing them with the wealth needed to build incredibly opulent temples. Cultural diffusion is also not unheard of in Japan. At the time of Asuka (538-710 AD), for example, Buddhist art brandished a distinctive sign Hellenistic style.

However, as Buddhist philosophy permeated Japanese culture, it brought wabi-sabi on. Whereas wabi-sabi has influenced everything from decor to relationships and even dental surgeryit is perhaps easier to perceive in the artistic traditions of the country.

Monochromatic sumi e the paintings leave large swaths of negative space to emphasize their natural subjects. Bonsai trees and ikebana flower arrangements celebrate the qualities of a single plant – from its leaves and vapors to the roots – rather than a crowded bouquet. Japanese teahouses are decorated sparingly so that every detail enhances the tea experience. And Japanese gardens forgo manicured rows in favor of curving, turning paths that defer to the natural landscape.

An ancient Japanese kintsugi bowl

Japanese craftsmanship kintsugi repairs ceramics with gold lacquer to enhance their imperfections — a representation of wabi-sabi in art. (Credit: Marco Montalti/Adobe Stock)

But the artistic application par excellence of wabi-sabi is kintsugi, a Japanese craft for repairing broken pottery. Rather than trying to hide the fractures and make the pottery look like new, kintsugi craftsmen use tree sap lacquer dusted with powdered gold, silver or platinum to accentuate cracks and repairs. (Kintsugi literally translates to “golden carpentry”.) Sometimes they even take pieces of other broken ceramics and combine them to form a new aesthetic.

By highlighting these imperfections, kintsugi celebrates the history of the piece while creating something completely individual. The damage is not only increased to artistic beauty, but it can never be reproduced because no ceramic will break the same way as another. This makes it more valuable in the eyes of the owner.

life as a work of wabi-sabi

You can see where this is happening: Wabi-sabi is much more than art and pottery. We can integrate this philosophy into almost every facet of our lives, and in doing so, it can be a powerful inoculator for perfectionism.

As perfectionists, we always strive to achieve masterpieces – the perfect wedding, the perfect test score, the perfect sports record, the perfect item, the perfect look and style. But even if we could achieve this noble goal, which we cannot, life and impermanence guarantee that it will not last. The reception will come to an end. You will not pass all the tests. Sports records are constantly broken. The article will become obsolete. And the only thing that ages faster than our body is last year’s fashion.

Rather than wasting time and mental energy striving for perfection, we can change our relationship to our efforts and to ourselves. We can accept our failures, appreciate our flaws, and even cultivate a form of self-esteem based on humility and acceptance.

Wabi-sabi is a beauty of imperfect, impermanent and incomplete things. It is a beauty of modest and humble things. It’s a beauty of unconventional things.

Leonard Koren

This does not mean wabi-sabi avoids self-improvement or the pursuit of excellence. The artistic traditions of Japan clearly indicate that wabi-sabi is no excuse for laziness. But as the kintsugi craftsman, we can celebrate and even accentuate mistakes as part of the story of what makes us unique – rather than aiming for a crackless but mass-produced version of ourselves.

And remember that the perfectionist trap traps both senses. When you demand perfectionism from art, vacations, or other people, you limit your ability to fully appreciate those aspects of your life. Wabi-sabi can help you open up to others and experiences, and celebrate their beauty in the moment.

Chasing halfway decent

You don’t have to be a Zen Buddhist to adopt a wabi-sabi world Vision. You can find items from wabi-sabi hidden in Western tradition, too. An Italian proverb — popularized by Voltaire but prior to him – declares: “The best is the enemy of the good.” Shakespeare wrote in King Lear that “in striving to improve, we often ruin what is going well”. And the Book of Ecclesiastes warns against the many vanities of life in favor of its simple pleasures.

In an interview, artist Nick Offerman expressed a more contemporary approach when discussing his approach to life and work: “I often adopt a general philosophy in my life of pursuing discipline of a kind or another… But it’s never to approach any level of perfection.” He added: “Instead, what keeps us going and what keeps me vitally engaged is a constant search for improvement. So I gave up perfect a long time ago. Now I’m just half decent hunting.

How to adopt wabi-sabi in your life? As you probably guessed, there is no methodology. You bring the worldview into your experiences and see if the mindset helps you overcome the many potential ways in which perfectionism manifests.

If your perfectionism leads to procrastination, for example, you might find wabi-sabi in the mix helps you get started faster. If you constantly compare yourself to others, it can help you appreciate both your accomplishments and your failures. And if you feel like you’re never good enough, it can help you push past those delays and see the gold in the cracks.

As Offerman notes, “If you’re making mistakes, it means you’re trying. It means you are trying to achieve something. And if you don’t make mistakes, that means you gave up.

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Joe Driver | Obituaries | kpcnews.com https://rgbonsai.com/joe-driver-obituaries-kpcnews-com/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/joe-driver-obituaries-kpcnews-com/ ANGOLA – Joe Driver died peacefully on August 25, 2022, two days before his 91st birthday, at Lakeland Rehab and Healthcare Center in Angola. Joe was born in Lima, Ohio on August 27, 1931, to Milton L. and Sarah Louise Driver. They died before him. He graduated from Lima Central High School in 1949. Joe […]]]>

ANGOLA – Joe Driver died peacefully on August 25, 2022, two days before his 91st birthday, at Lakeland Rehab and Healthcare Center in Angola.

Joe was born in Lima, Ohio on August 27, 1931, to Milton L. and Sarah Louise Driver. They died before him.

He graduated from Lima Central High School in 1949.

Joe was married to Janice Houston and they had four children.

He worked for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad before moving to Fort Wayne in 1959, to become Buildings and Grounds Manager at the Mutual Security Life Insurance Company. At Mutual Security, Joe developed an enthusiastic interest in contemporary art and landscaping.

In the mid-1960s, Joe became involved in the youth programs of the Church of the Brethren, a passion for youth ministry that he nurtured throughout his life. He played a major role in the renovation and operation of the church’s Camp Mack.

He was a lifelong Freemason, serving as a Master Mason and Shriner. In 1984 Joe moved to Clear Lake to pursue his interest in sailing. As a member of the Clear Lake Yacht Club, he sailed ‘Ol’ Grandad’, his beloved Tornado catamaran, in Club races. Joe has managed many construction projects in northeast Indiana and has collected vintage John Deere tractors.

In retirement, Joe married Linda Duncan and began a new career as a lapidary, making jewelry by cutting and polishing stones and gems. He participated in local craft shows, exhibited his jewelry at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, and became an active member of the Three Rivers Gem and Mineral Society, the Regional Artists Guild of Angola, and the Fort Wayne Bonsai Club. .

Joe is survived by his four children, Dorian (Rick) Maples of Fort Wayne, Valerie (Jon) Brelje of Fort Wayne, Louisea (Mike) Baker of Fort Wayne and Toby (Kathy) Driver of Honolulu; and stepsons, Gary (Terri) Hobbs, of Fort Wayne and Brian (Holly) Hobbs, of Kendallville. He is also survived by his brother, Ben Driver, of Maumee, Ohio; sister, Sue (Larry) Lantzer, of Fort Wayne; many grandchildren; and great-grandchildren.

He was predeceased by his wife, Linda.

“Papa Joe” will be dearly missed by his countless family and friends, who enjoyed his bohemian ethos and his nachos and margaritas on his patio in Clear Lake.

When asked what he wanted to include in his obituary, Joe asked for the following quote from Hunter S. Thompson: “Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to slip. broadside in a cloud of smoke, completely worn out, totally worn out, and proclaiming loud and clear ‘Wow! What a journey!'”.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, October 29, 2022, at the First Congregational United Church of Christ in Angola, 314 W. Maumee St., Angola, Indiana.

A reception at the Clear Lake Yacht Club, 188 Lake Drive, Clear Lake, Fremont, Indiana, will begin at 5 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, contributions to First Congregational United Church of Christ, 314 W. Maumee St., #1427, Angola, IN 46703, or Clear Lake Township Land Conservancy of Fremont, 111 Gecowets Drive, Fremont, IN 46737 , would be welcomed and appreciated by his family.

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Who is Cobra Kai’s new character, Jessica Andrews? Karate Kid Legacy Character Explained https://rgbonsai.com/who-is-cobra-kais-new-character-jessica-andrews-karate-kid-legacy-character-explained/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 10:23:26 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/who-is-cobra-kais-new-character-jessica-andrews-karate-kid-legacy-character-explained/ A classic Karate Kid character makes an appearance in Season 5 of Cobra Kai. But who is Jessica Andrews? And how does she connect to Daniel LaRusso? Cobra Kai is about the ongoing war between karate foes Daniel LaRusso and Johnny Lawrence, and the battle between the kids in the respective dojos. Along the way, […]]]>

A classic Karate Kid character makes an appearance in Season 5 of Cobra Kai. But who is Jessica Andrews? And how does she connect to Daniel LaRusso?

Cobra Kai is about the ongoing war between karate foes Daniel LaRusso and Johnny Lawrence, and the battle between the kids in the respective dojos.

Along the way, characters from the Karate Kid films have appeared, including Daniel’s nemesis from The Karate Kid, John Kreese. His nemesis in The Karate Kid Part II, Chozen. And the man who caused him severe pain in The Karate Kid Part III, Terry Silver.

We’ve already established that Mike Barnes – another Part III villain – makes a cameo in Season 5. But an old love of that film also popped up midway through the series.

Who is Jessica Andrews in The Karate Kid Part III?

In The Karate Kid Part III, Jessica Andrews almost becomes Daniel LaRusso’s girlfriend, as she also finds herself embroiled in his drama with Terry Silver and Mike Barnes.

The film sees Mr. Miyagi opening a Bonsai Tree store, and Jessica – who moved to Los Angeles from Ohio – works in the pottery store across the road. Daniel has an immediate connection with Jessica when they meet and asks her out on a date.

Pictures of Colombia

Ralph Macchio as Daniel and Robin Lively as Jessica in The Karate Kid Part III.

However, the course of love does not run smoothly, as pretty much every time they get together, karate bad-boy Mike Barnes seems to cause trouble, fighting Daniel, punching Jessica and even threatening to kill them during a rendezvous while rappelling.

Their short-lived romance ends when Daniel breaks a guy’s nose at a club, after which they decide to be friends, and Jessica moves back to Ohio.

How does Jessica Andrews fit into Cobra Kai?

Jessica was upset by Daniel’s temper and his use of violence in The Karate Kid Part III. And his wife Amanda feels the same way in season 5 of Cobra Kai, so much so that she needs a break, so heads to her hometown in Ohio with the kids.

There, she goes to a bar with her cousin, who happens to be… Jessica! It turns out that when Amanda moved to Los Angeles, Amanda hooked her up with Daniel, and the rest is Cobra Kai history.

The couple have a heart-to-heart over drinks, and Jessica suggests that Amanda give Daniel some slack regarding Terry Silver, explaining that he did a “real number” on her husband, and that Daniel perfectly right to hate the nasty ponytail.

They also get into a bar fight, in which Amanda’s daughter, Samantha, saves the day. But that’s all we see of Jessica, so she never shares scenes with Daniel.

Who plays Jessica Andrews in Cobra Kai?

Robin Lively played Jessica Andrews in The Karate Kid: Part III, and she’s reprising the role in Season 5 of Cobra Kai.

Lively is best known for playing the titular character in the 1989 teen comedy Teen Witch, during which she witnessed a memorable – and now infamous – rap (see below).

Lively was a child star who appeared in bands like Punky Brewster, Silver Spoons and 21 Jump Street, before landing the recurring role of Lana Budding Milford on Twin Peaks.

Her highest-profile project since then has been the 2014 horror film Ouija, while Lively has continued to do television, appearing on shows like 30 Rock, Psych and It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

Lively recently played Sara Bellum in the Powerpuff TV pilot – a live-action sequel to The Powerpuff Girls – but the series has yet to be greenlit.

Cobra Kai Season 5 is available to stream on Netflix now.

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Life is a balancing act for plants https://rgbonsai.com/life-is-a-balancing-act-for-plants/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 21:39:07 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/life-is-a-balancing-act-for-plants/ As a botanist and extension worker, I think a lot about how plants grow. Understanding the method to their madness allows us to explain and diagnose the various concerns of citizens who come to us at the extension office. One of the many fascinating concepts of plant growth is the balance between root and shoot […]]]>

As a botanist and extension worker, I think a lot about how plants grow.

Understanding the method to their madness allows us to explain and diagnose the various concerns of citizens who come to us at the extension office. One of the many fascinating concepts of plant growth is the balance between root and shoot growth, referred to in some scientific publications as the root-to-shoot ratio, which scientists have found to be fairly constant for each particular species.

Seed library:From Arugula to Swiss Chard: Create a Fall Garden by Visiting the Leon County Seed Library

Mystery Plant:This prolific pea is a herbaceous member of the bean family | Mystery Plant

As humans, we are primarily concerned with the sprout part of this equation, because that is the part of the plant that we can see. However, as has been mentioned in numerous articles by many volunteer extension workers and master gardeners, the health of a plant’s roots is just as much, if not more, of a concern to the overall appearance and production potential of the plant as a whole.

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‘Like raising children’: Bonsai master expands Japanese art with Australian fig trees https://rgbonsai.com/like-raising-children-bonsai-master-expands-japanese-art-with-australian-fig-trees/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 04:11:45 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/like-raising-children-bonsai-master-expands-japanese-art-with-australian-fig-trees/ Strong points Megumi Bennett is a bonsai master who came to Australia from Japan aged 28 in 1974. As the founder of the Bonsai Society of Sydney, Ms. Bennett is passionate about incorporating Australian plants into centuries-old Japanese art. She says caring for a bonsai tree is like caring for your own child When Mrs […]]]>
Strong points
  • Megumi Bennett is a bonsai master who came to Australia from Japan aged 28 in 1974.
  • As the founder of the Bonsai Society of Sydney, Ms. Bennett is passionate about incorporating Australian plants into centuries-old Japanese art.
  • She says caring for a bonsai tree is like caring for your own child
When Mrs Bennett arrived in Australia in 1974 at the age of 28, she hoped to study the local flora in order to put a unique spin on the Japanese art forms of bonsai and ikebana.
After completing a three-year horticulture course at the Ryde School of Horticulture, where she also taught bonsai, Ms Bennett opened a bonsai nursery in Terrey Hills, north Sydney, in 1988.

Ms Bennett then founded the Bonsai Society of Sydney in 1999. In total, she has been a bonsai expert for over 45 years.

Japanese bonsai with Australian fig tree at Bonsai Society of Sydney 2022 Bonsai Exhibition. Credit: SBS

Bonsai, which means “tree in a container”, is the Japanese art of growing and training trees in a pot or container. The culture dates back to the 14th century.

Compared to potted flowers, bonsai needs a lot more commitment and it can take years for a tree to start showing its shape, individual characteristics and beauty.
In recent times, bonsai has become a global phenomenon. The World Bonsai Convention, started in 1989, is held every four years in different corners of the world, just like the Olympic Games.
At the eighth convention held in 2017 in Saitama, Japan, about 60% of the 1,200 exhibitors came from outside Japan.

This year, the 9th World Bonsai Convention will be held online from Perth, WA, starting October 8 and lasting nine days.

australian bonsai

Ms Bennett’s interest in migrating Down Under stemmed from a book sent to her by an Australian high school art teacher which detailed native flowers.
She describes it as a moment that changed her life.
“I saw flowers that I had never seen before [in the book]. I felt like going to Australia and trying Japanese ikebana with Australian flowers,” Ms Bennett told SBS Japanese.
She started learning ikebana, the Japanese flower arrangement, when she was in 7th grade and earned a teaching certificate for it when she was a freshman in college.
Ms Bennett applied for a one-year business visa with the aim of teaching ikebana in Australia.

“The [sad] thing about ikebana is that your work does not last. What’s left in your hands [after years] are just pictures. I wanted my work to stay with me longer. That’s one of the reasons why I leaned more towards bonsai,” says Ms. Bennett.

Megumi Bennett, Japanese bonsai master

Japanese bonsai master Megumi Bennett gives a lecture. Credit: Bonsai Art Pty Ltd

Whether it’s bonsai or ikebana, Ms Bennett says she must have a thorough understanding of Australian plants, nature, the seasons and the landscape.

Her passion for creating a uniquely Australian version of bonsai led her to conduct extensive research into native fig trees.
In 2018, Mrs Bennett and her son Alex, also a bonsai expert, organized a bonsai exhibition featuring Australian fig trees in Sydney.

“In general, Australian trees are happy as long as you give them plenty of water. If something goes wrong, it’s often a water problem. They’re drier and tougher than Japanese trees, so it’s so it’s hard for you to arrange the shape using threads,” says Bennett.

Every tree is different. Fig trees, we see personality. Look at their aerial roots.

Megumi Bennett

According to Ms. Bennett, the fig species that are best suited for bonsai are the Port Jackson fig and the small-leaved fig, as their leaves become smaller and denser over time.
Both are found in Sydney Parks.
She has also made bonsai with the Sandpaper Creek fig tree, the Moreton Bay fig tree and even tropical fig trees from Queensland.
“If I choose an attractive fig tree as a bonsai, it would be a large-leaved weeping fig tree.

“This tree does not grow tall, so you are allowed to plant it in your garden. They bear many small fruits and the branches fall with the fruits. It is unique, good for a bonsai.”

Like taking care of your own child

If you start your bonsai from a seed, it takes up to 10 years to see its “adult” form. Bonsai trees need personalized daily care, including watering a few times a day, regular pruning, humidity and temperature control, and changing pots as they grow.

Ms Bennett says it’s not uncommon for people to treat their bonsai as if it were their own child or family member.

Bonsai at Megumi Bennett's studio

Credit: Bonsai Art Pty Ltd

Bonsai can be passed down from generation to generation. For some people, a bonsai of their age is a lifelong companion. Some people start a bonsai when their grandson is born.

“When you start from a seed, it’s exciting to see how it grows, it’s a great joy to see it,” says Ms Bennett.

After many years, your bonsai is no longer a ‘child’, now it’s up to you to learn from them. You learn a lot from old bonsai.

Megumi Bennett

The comparison with a family member does not stop there.

“Showing your bonsai at an exhibition makes you as nervous as if your child were on stage or something. I don’t really sell my bonsai collection, but when I let it go, it’s not easy at all,” adds Ms. Bennett.

Megumi Bennett, Japanese bonsai master

Credit: Bonsai Art Pty Ltd

Ms. Bennett recently sold a plant from her collection to an enthusiast. The buyer’s request was to take the bonsai out of its container and plant it in his yard.

“A part of me doesn’t want to keep bonsai just for me. If it’s a good bonsai, it’s nice to be seen and appreciated by others,” she says with a smile.
“The buyer agreed to have the bonsai checked twice a year for maintenance. I can live with that.”

The Bonsai Society of Sydney will hold a bonsai exhibition at the Calyx in the Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney, September 9-11.

Download the free SBS Radio app to listen live and on demand or explore podcasts.

Visit our Facebook for more Japanese stories and images.

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8 Incredible October Vacation Trips to Do in China – This is Beijing https://rgbonsai.com/8-incredible-october-vacation-trips-to-do-in-china-this-is-beijing/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 02:56:59 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/8-incredible-october-vacation-trips-to-do-in-china-this-is-beijing/ 8-Day Tiger Leaping Gorge and Hidden Paradise Yubeng Village Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures While most people have heard of Yunnan’s famous Tiger Leaping Gorge, Yubeng Village is more of a hidden gem. Located at the foot of the sacred Meili Snow Mountain range, it remained undiscovered for hundreds of years simply due to its […]]]>

8-Day Tiger Leaping Gorge and Hidden Paradise Yubeng Village

Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures

While most people have heard of Yunnan’s famous Tiger Leaping Gorge, Yubeng Village is more of a hidden gem. Located at the foot of the sacred Meili Snow Mountain range, it remained undiscovered for hundreds of years simply due to its inaccessibility from the outside world.

Tiger-2.jpgImage courtesy of Dragon Adventures

It remains isolated to this day, a full day’s walk from the nearest tarmac road, and therein lies its appeal – that of secluded, unspoilt majesty. This trip includes stunning hikes to and from the Tiger Leaping Gorge, Yubeng Village and Lijiang, as well as experiencing the rich culture and colors of this remarkable part of Yunnan.

For more information, click here

Amazing 8 Days Guizhou Tour

1724379249.jpg
Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures

Arriving in Guiyang, famous for its leek and sour and spicy dishes, you will then head to Huangguoshu Falls, the largest and arguably the most beautiful waterfall in China.

640.jpg
Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures

The trip also includes remote areas with stunning landscapes that only connoisseurs can reach, as well as visiting the largest Miao village in the world. Eat with the locals and try many amazing dishes that you can only find in this part of China.

For more information, click here

5-Day Guilin Scenic Tour

556201525.jpg
Image via Dragon Adventures

Explore the beautiful natural landscape of Guilin, with its world famous mountain formations, rivers, karst caves and stone carvings. Visit ancient villages, cruise the crystal clear waters of the Li River flanked by peaks and rice paddies, cycle the ’10 Mile Gallery Road’ – so called because it is so scenic – and visit the Longsheng Rice Terraces – some of the highlights of this unforgettable five-day trip.

For more information, click here

4-Day Spectacular Mount Tianzhu and Haven Lake Villa

_20220905103659.jpg

Tianzhu Mountain Scenic Area is one of Anhui’s Three Famous Mountains and offers exquisite natural scenery that is both unique and majestic. Tianzhu also offers us a refuge from the crowds during the National Day holiday.

Enjoy an incredible hotel-villa package by the hidden alpine Alchemy Lake at an altitude of 1,100 meters. It is said that Zuo Ci, a famous Taoist scholar from the late Eastern Han Dynasty, once collected medicine for his alchemy here, and his kiln is still there to this day. Surrounded by mist in the morning, or after rain when the sky is clear, the lake is truly reminiscent of a fairyland.

For more information, click here

4-Day Changsha, Zhangjiajie and ‘Avatar Mountain’ Glass Bridge

549984060.jpgImage courtesy of Dragon Adventures

Located in the mountain ranges of northern Hunan, the remote Zhangjiajie National Forest was only known to the Tujia, Miao and Bai minority groups for centuries. Today, with its towering karst spiers, rich brown earth and lush forests, Zhangjiajie has become a striking and iconic Chinese landscape.

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992 and immortalized in film Avatarthe park is a spectacular landscape of deep forested canyons and huge isolated limestone peaks, each with its own miniature bonsai forest-like ecosystems.

This tour also includes the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon Glass Bridge, the longest and tallest glass-bottomed bridge in the world – walk it if you dare! – and the capital of Hunan Province, Changsha, where you can do some sightseeing with Chairman Mao.

For more information, click here

4 Days of Beautiful Nature in Southern Anhui

Anhui.jpgImage courtesy of Dragon Adventures

Jixi, part of the ancient region of Huizhou, is a heavenly space surrounded by mountains, forests and green fields, ideal for a holiday immersed in peaceful natural beauty. Hike the Zhangshan Grand Canyon, with its winding cliffs, silver waterfalls, crystal-clear streams, swimming pools and springs, all surrounded by bamboo and pine forests.

For more information, click here

3-Day Gouqi Island Getaway

1842002623.jpg
Image via Dragon Adventures

Watch the sunrise over the mountains and stand over an abandoned village; relax on the beautiful beach and host a bonfire at night; rent a boat and go fishing and enjoy delicious seafood dinners. Gouqi Island is a serene and scenic getaway, perfect for a few days of relaxation.

For more information, click here

3 days at Yellow Mountain & Hot Springs Resort

507318040.jpg
Image via Dragon Adventures

Huangshan, or Yellow Mountain, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of China’s top tourist destinations. Located in the province of Anhui, it is a must-see destination in the country and has served as an inspiration to Chinese painters for hundreds of years, with its landscapes of peculiarly shaped granite peaks, pine trees, hot springs , sunsets and views of the clouds from above. And what better way to enjoy its majesty than to stay at a spa resort and soak in its pools?

For more information, click here


Do you want to promote a travel offer?

Contact Christy by email at christycai@thatsmags.com and on WeChat by scanning the QR code below:

Christy-QR.jpg

[Cover image courtesy of Dragon Adventures]

]]>
8 Incredible October Vacation Trips to Do in China – Thatsmags.com https://rgbonsai.com/8-incredible-october-vacation-trips-to-do-in-china-thatsmags-com/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 02:55:43 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/8-incredible-october-vacation-trips-to-do-in-china-thatsmags-com/ 8-Day Tiger Leaping Gorge and Hidden Paradise Yubeng Village Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures While most people have heard of Yunnan’s famous Tiger Leaping Gorge, Yubeng Village is more of a hidden gem. Located at the foot of the sacred Meili Snow Mountain range, it remained undiscovered for hundreds of years simply due to its […]]]>

8-Day Tiger Leaping Gorge and Hidden Paradise Yubeng Village

Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures

While most people have heard of Yunnan’s famous Tiger Leaping Gorge, Yubeng Village is more of a hidden gem. Located at the foot of the sacred Meili Snow Mountain range, it remained undiscovered for hundreds of years simply due to its inaccessibility from the outside world.

Tiger-2.jpgImage courtesy of Dragon Adventures

It remains isolated to this day, a full day’s walk from the nearest tarmac road, and therein lies its appeal – that of secluded, unspoilt majesty. This trip includes stunning hikes to and from the Tiger Leaping Gorge, Yubeng Village and Lijiang, as well as experiencing the rich culture and colors of this remarkable part of Yunnan.

For more information, click here

Amazing 8 Days Guizhou Tour

1724379249.jpg
Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures

Arriving in Guiyang, famous for its leek and sour and spicy dishes, you will then head to Huangguoshu Falls, the largest and arguably the most beautiful waterfall in China.

640.jpg
Image courtesy of Dragon Adventures

The trip also includes remote areas with stunning landscapes that only connoisseurs can reach, as well as visiting the largest Miao village in the world. Eat with the locals and try many amazing dishes that you can only find in this part of China.

For more information, click here

5-Day Guilin Scenic Tour

556201525.jpg
Image via Dragon Adventures

Explore the beautiful natural landscape of Guilin, with its world famous mountain formations, rivers, karst caves and stone carvings. Visit ancient villages, cruise the crystal clear waters of the Li River flanked by peaks and rice paddies, cycle the ’10 Mile Gallery Road’ – so called because it is so scenic – and visit the Longsheng Rice Terraces – some of the highlights of this unforgettable five-day trip.

For more information, click here

4-Day Spectacular Mount Tianzhu and Haven Lake Villa

_20220905103659.jpg

Tianzhu Mountain Scenic Area is one of Anhui’s Three Famous Mountains and offers exquisite natural scenery that is both unique and majestic. Tianzhu also offers us a refuge from the crowds during the National Day holiday.

Enjoy an incredible hotel-villa package by the hidden alpine Alchemy Lake at an altitude of 1,100 meters. It is said that Zuo Ci, a famous Taoist scholar from the late Eastern Han Dynasty, once collected medicine for his alchemy here, and his kiln is still there to this day. Surrounded by mist in the morning, or after rain when the sky is clear, the lake is truly reminiscent of a fairyland.

For more information, click here

4-Day Changsha, Zhangjiajie and ‘Avatar Mountain’ Glass Bridge

549984060.jpgImage courtesy of Dragon Adventures

Located in the mountain ranges of northern Hunan, the remote Zhangjiajie National Forest was only known to the Tujia, Miao and Bai minority groups for centuries. Today, with its towering karst spiers, rich brown earth and lush forests, Zhangjiajie has become a striking and iconic Chinese landscape.

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992 and immortalized in film Avatarthe park is a spectacular landscape of deep forested canyons and huge isolated limestone peaks, each with its own miniature bonsai forest-like ecosystems.

This tour also includes the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon Glass Bridge, the longest and tallest glass-bottomed bridge in the world – walk it if you dare! – and the capital of Hunan Province, Changsha, where you can do some sightseeing with Chairman Mao.

For more information, click here

4 Days of Beautiful Nature in Southern Anhui

Anhui.jpgImage courtesy of Dragon Adventures

Jixi, part of the ancient region of Huizhou, is a heavenly space surrounded by mountains, forests and green fields, ideal for a holiday immersed in peaceful natural beauty. Hike the Zhangshan Grand Canyon, with its winding cliffs, silver waterfalls, crystal-clear streams, swimming pools and springs, all surrounded by bamboo and pine forests.

For more information, click here

3-Day Gouqi Island Getaway

1842002623.jpg
Image via Dragon Adventures

Watch the sunrise over the mountains and stand over an abandoned village; relax on the beautiful beach and host a bonfire at night; rent a boat and go fishing and enjoy delicious seafood dinners. Gouqi Island is a serene and scenic getaway, perfect for a few days of relaxation.

For more information, click here

3 days at Yellow Mountain & Hot Springs Resort

507318040.jpg
Image via Dragon Adventures

Huangshan, or Yellow Mountain, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of China’s top tourist destinations. Located in the province of Anhui, it is a must-see destination in the country and has served as an inspiration to Chinese painters for hundreds of years, with its landscapes of peculiarly shaped granite peaks, pine trees, hot springs , sunsets and views of the clouds from above. And what better way to enjoy its majesty than to stay at a spa resort and soak in its pools?

For more information, click here


Do you want to promote a travel offer?

Contact Christy by email at christycai@thatsmags.com and on WeChat by scanning the QR code below:

Christy-QR.jpg

[Cover image courtesy of Dragon Adventures]

]]>
Cultivating a passion – Winnipeg Free Press https://rgbonsai.com/cultivating-a-passion-winnipeg-free-press/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 00:00:48 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/cultivating-a-passion-winnipeg-free-press/ NEAR STE. GENEVIEVE — Twice a day, Joe Grande hops on his bike and pedals to the wooded alcove near the entrance to his long driveway. He could walk, but biking is the best way to “beat the mosquitoes”. The clearing is surrounded by a lush stand of tall poplars, oaks and birches. Atop handmade […]]]>

NEAR STE. GENEVIEVE — Twice a day, Joe Grande hops on his bike and pedals to the wooded alcove near the entrance to his long driveway. He could walk, but biking is the best way to “beat the mosquitoes”.

The clearing is surrounded by a lush stand of tall poplars, oaks and birches. Atop handmade tables and inside purpose-built shade structures, another forest thrives in miniature. The scene is intensely green.

Grande lights the hose attached to her rainwater harvesting system and begins to mist. Bonsai do best with a regular regimen of neutral water; what comes out of the tap contains too many chemicals and trace elements for small trees.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Joe Grande sprays his bonsai trees with rainwater; tap water contains too many chemicals and trace elements.

He started training his first bonsai 33 years ago and moved to the countryside a decade later, intending to build an outdoor workshop large enough to support the hobby.

With a collection of nearly 200 trees, hobby hardly seems the right word.

“Obsession?” he offers with a smile.

Previously, Grande and his wife lived in Wolseley, where he cared for around 40 bonsai trees in a small urban yard. The couple moved east in search of more space for their respective passions — he trains trees, she trains obedience dogs.

Annual Bonsai Show Winnipeg

Norwood Community Center, 87 Walmer St.

Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.

Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Free

Visit bonsaiwinnipeg.ca for more information

A Japanese art form, bonsai involves keeping miniature trees to look like lifelike representations of their wild counterparts. It is art imitating nature.

There are three stages in bonsai: development, balance and refinement. Grande’s collection is in various stages of development; developing trees have been heavily pruned to encourage leaf and root growth, while those in balance are bound by wires directing the branches into position.

Refinement is exactly what it sounds like – taking care of the details and getting the thumbnails ready for display. In the final stage, water and fertilizers are often withheld to prevent unplanned growth.

For the uninitiated, this can all seem quite violent. From Grande’s perspective, this is an improvement over the forces acting on a tree in the wild.

“There are diseases, insects, lightning, we cut them down for furniture and to build houses,” he says. “A bonsai in a pot, properly cared for, will outlive its natural lifespan.”

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Grande signals a bud emerging on a portulacaria afra, or elephant bush.

Grande is gentle with a calm demeanor – zen, if you will. His silent dedication is expressed through a wealth of knowledge about the art form and every tree in his possession. Choose an individual and he will be able to indicate the genus as well as the date and place of its harvest.

Don’t ask him to choose his favorites. “How does a parent choose their favorite child? ” he asks.

While describing the nuances of bonsai, he zigzags around the yard, pointing to examples of different patterns, settings, and techniques. He doesn’t have a favorite tree, but he does have preferences.

“Here I’ll show you,” he says, when asked about his favorite style. “It’s a literate bonsai and it’s characterized by a trunk that has little or no taper and a lot of undulating movement – ​​it’s reminiscent of Chinese calligraphy.”

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The copper wire helps to place the branches in the desired position.

The evergreen tree stands about a meter tall, with little foliage and a slender trunk swooping down in a dramatic curl. There are trees growing at extreme angles, cascading from their pots and carried away by an unseen wind. A trio of tiny larch trees cling to a large mossy boulder, evoking the landscape of the Canadian Shield. Grande’s creations are based on established bonsai traditions and inspired by the chaos of nature. Some limbs and trunks are carved to look like they have been broken or ravaged by rot.

“As an artist, you have to be brave,” he says. “Be prepared to follow the guidelines, but break the rules.”

Larch is Grande’s favorite species (much like those found in the northern boreal forest, the bonsai versions also turn golden in the fall), followed by eastern cedar and potentilla, a compact flowering shrub. It is a common misconception that only certain types of trees, grown indoors, can be considered bonsai. Aside from the stipulation that they must be grown in a shallow pot, virtually any plant can be made into a pint-sized replica.

With the exception of a few tropical species, most of Grande’s trees live outdoors year-round. It collects stunted greens and saplings from bogs and scrub in Manitoba. Since the species are native to the region, they are well equipped to weather the prairie seasons.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Joe Grande has over 200 bonsai in formation on his property. With the exception of a few tropical plants, most of its trees live outdoors all year round.

Growing outdoors comes with its own set of challenges. Insects are a constant concern, and hungry deer and squirrels have destroyed a number of treetops.

“It sets me back four years every time they do that,” Grande says. “You cry a lot in bonsai.”

This grief is one of the reasons he has so many trees. Having a large collection makes room for inevitable failures and allows for constant fiddling. Bonsai is a long game – the trees must be trained in position for years before giving in to their stylized fate. Do too much too soon and the tree could die.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

“You cry a lot in bonsai,” Joe Grande says of his meticulous hobby.

Grande, 75, is a semi-retired graphic designer. While the horticultural side of bonsai attracts him, trees have been part of his life since birth; his childhood home in Italy had a vast orchard – the vibrant artistry is what fuels the obsession.

“It’s just me, the tree and Mother Nature,” he says. “I saw it as a relationship I could gravitate toward.”

In many ways bonsai is a lonely quest. However, like any niche interest, there is a large community around the practice.

In the center of her black baseball cap, Grande wears a small gold pin. It is a souvenir from one of the World Expos he visited as an active member of Bonsai Clubs International. While his interest in the hobby was piqued in 1984 after watching The Karate Kidit wasn’t until he joined the local Winnipeg Bonsai Club in 1989 that he began to cultivate his passion in earnest.

Club president Scott Samson has a similar bonsai story.

“Seeing Mr. Miyagi farting with tiny little trees and cultivating them was what gave me the bug back then,” says Samson, who has worked with bonsai for 15 years.

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Scott Samson, president of Bonsai Winnipeg, trims a tree in his home in North Kildonan.

Today he has 40 trees in formation in the backyard of his home in North Kildonan. At first, he and his brother tried playing with greenery purchased from a nursery, but had little success until they joined Bonsai Winnipeg.

“It’s a pretty deep craft,” he says. “So we decided to find out more about how to do this thing so that we’re not just torturing and killing small trees.”

Still, the learning curve was steep.

“For the first eight years, I had the reputation of killing more trees than anyone in the history of our club,” Samson laughs. “I would bring (a tree) home and wire every branch, cut off all the foliage and repot it – you do it twice, and the tree isn’t strong enough to live on.”

He learned a lot about patience through trial and error and through mentorship from fellow club members, including Grande.

Bonsai Winnipeg holds monthly meetings, weekend workshops and introductory courses for beginners. Each spring and fall, members are invited on a field trip to dig up native trees and this weekend the club hosts its annual show, which gives local practitioners the opportunity to display their trees and share the art form with the public.

Local interest in bonsai has recently exploded. The club currently has around 120 members, up from 30 a few years ago. Samson credits the growth to an enthusiastic board, effective outreach, and the COVID-19 pandemic, which has seen many people try new activities from home.

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Shannon Block is an avid gardener who joined the Winnipeg Bonsai Club this year after taking the introductory course over several weekends.

Shannon Block joined the club this year after attending the 20-hour Introduction to Bonsai course over several weekends.

“Oh my God, you’re learning a lot,” she said. “I’ve only scratched the surface. There is so much more to know, and I left delighted to learn more and reconnect with the people I met during the course.

Block is an avid gardener who has a house full of plants and a yard full of flowers and vegetables on her half-acre property in West Saint Paul. Bonsai seemed like a good opportunity to flex his already very green thumbs.

At the end of the Bonsai Winnipeg course, she received two trees to take home and practice. Block is happy to report that both survived the season and she has already added three more to her collection. The bonsai bug takes root quickly.

“It was hard for me not to want to do more for my tree,” she says. “And that’s what makes you want to go find another tree or another bush or other plants to start working on.”

Block is thrilled to have one of her trees on display at this weekend’s show at the Norwood Community Center. Samson will display 10 of his trees, while Grande plans to load 14 of his bonsai trees into his “tree transporter” – a silver Volkswagen van – and transport them to Winnipeg.

The expo is a chance to share knowledge, celebrate incremental progress, and connect with like-minded people.

“Everyone has something to tell you about what they did to their tree, or how they got into it, or what they hope for that tree in a few years,” Samson says. “It’s quite exciting.”

eva.wasney@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @evawasney

Eva Wasney

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