Bonsai making http://rgbonsai.com/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 03:59:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Bonsai making http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Little treasures at the Huntington as the Botanical Gardens host the 64th Annual Bonsai Show this weekend – Pasadena Weekendr https://rgbonsai.com/little-treasures-at-the-huntington-as-the-botanical-gardens-host-the-64th-annual-bonsai-show-this-weekend-pasadena-weekendr/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/little-treasures-at-the-huntington-as-the-botanical-gardens-host-the-64th-annual-bonsai-show-this-weekend-pasadena-weekendr/ Nature never ceases to fascinate, and among its tricks is the timeless art of bonsai. The ancient horticultural art form popular today is actually an adaptation of the original Chinese art of Penjing, which also has to do with the art of shaping miniaturized trees. Spectacular displays of ancient art will be on display as […]]]>

Nature never ceases to fascinate, and among its tricks is the timeless art of bonsai. The ancient horticultural art form popular today is actually an adaptation of the original Chinese art of Penjing, which also has to do with the art of shaping miniaturized trees.

Spectacular displays of ancient art will be on display as the California Bonsai Society presents its 64th annual exhibition, Saturday and Sunday, March 19 and 20, at the Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens.

According to the New York Times, “The term ‘Bonsai’ should be reserved for plants that are grown in shallow containers following precise principles of bonsai pruning and training, resulting in an artful miniature replica of a tree. adult in nature.”

In the most restrictive sense, “bonsai” refers to miniaturized trees grown in containers, respecting Japanese tradition and principles. Bonsai art focuses on the long-term cultivation and shaping of one or more small trees growing in a container.

As Huntington notes, “Bonsai come from many sources. Some trees, such as junipers and California oaks, are taken from the wild. Some, like pomegranates, are harvested from urban landscapes. Many come from nurseries. The bonsai displayed at The Huntington have been donated or acquired from private bonsai enthusiasts, primarily but not exclusively from Southern California.

“The trees in the Huntington Collection, which includes the collection of the Golden State Bonsai Federation, represent some of the finest and oldest examples of bonsai in the United States,” according to the museum and gardens.

Dozens of beautiful specimens created by bonsai masters will be presented as well as those in the permanent exhibition in the Bonsai Courtyards of the Japanese Garden.

64th Annual Bonsai Show, Brody Botanical Center, The Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens | 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, CA. March 19-20. Saturday March 19, 2022. 10am-5pm.



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Bonsai trees stolen from Mawson Lakes garden prompting police investigation https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-trees-stolen-from-mawson-lakes-garden-prompting-police-investigation/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-trees-stolen-from-mawson-lakes-garden-prompting-police-investigation/ Police are on the hunt for a light-fingered, green-fingered thief who made off with a large amount of valuable bonsai trees from the back garden of an Adelaide home. Key points: Twenty plants were originally reported missing earlier this month Some are over 40 years old and have been valued in the thousands of dollars […]]]>

Police are on the hunt for a light-fingered, green-fingered thief who made off with a large amount of valuable bonsai trees from the back garden of an Adelaide home.

More than 20 of the miniature trees were reported missing from a home on Lakefield Crescent in Mawson Lakes earlier this month.

Police said a “large number” of plants were stolen after entering the back garden of the house on Saturday February 5.

This includes mature bonsai trees over 40 years old and worth about $20,000, police said.

The victim reported that “three large bonsai trees were stolen” from the property on Tuesday, February 15.

A file image of a black pine bonsai. (ABC Northern Tasmania: Sarah Abbott)

Luke from the SA Bonsai Society told ABC Radio Adelaide Afternoons host Sonya Feldhoff that there is also strong sentimental value associated with bonsai.

“There are bonsai that change hands for that kind of money, but the true value of bonsai is the aesthetic and sentimental value,” he said.

“My own collection here, most I didn’t pay any money for them, they were grown from seed cuttings and cultivated by me for many years.

“What price do you put on that for watering and pruning every day for years, even decades? A thousand dollars might not seem like enough.”

Luke said it would be difficult for thieves to sell the stolen trees.

“That’s a hard thing to understand about bonsai theft, where the hell would you try to sell them?” he said.

“The Australian bonsai community is quite a tight-knit community and everyone from all bonsai clubs, Facebook and all other platforms will be keeping an eye out for these trees.”

Police have asked anyone with knowledge of the robberies or who saw suspicious activity in the area at the time of the robberies to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or online.

Job , updated

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10 tips for making the most of trends in the small business community https://rgbonsai.com/10-tips-for-making-the-most-of-trends-in-the-small-business-community/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 14:00:16 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/10-tips-for-making-the-most-of-trends-in-the-small-business-community/ Monitoring trends is an important part of running a small business. Each year brings changes in your industry and the tools and platforms you use. Thus, your ability to adapt can have a major impact on your success. Find out about current trends and ideas from members of the online small business community here. Learn […]]]>

Monitoring trends is an important part of running a small business. Each year brings changes in your industry and the tools and platforms you use. Thus, your ability to adapt can have a major impact on your success. Find out about current trends and ideas from members of the online small business community here.



Learn some hooks from viral TikToks

TikTok is definitely one of the hottest social platforms of 2021, so it can bring tons of value to marketers. Even if you aren’t actually using TikTok to reach your audience, there may be lessons to be learned from content that goes viral. To verify this post from SEMRush for more on the subject.

Get the most out of video storytelling

Video is one of the most important online marketing strategies of 2021. If you aren’t already using it to market your business, now is the time to start. Read this post from Jodi Harris’s Content Marketing Institute for advice.

Stay up to date with LinkedIn trends

LinkedIn has long been one of the most powerful networks for businesses and professionals. But the exact benefits and uses of the platform may change from year to year. In this article on Startup Bonsai, Christopher Benitez go over some facts and statistics related to LinkedIn trends. And BizSugar members commented on the post here.

Measure the ROI of influencer marketing

Influencer marketing is a huge trend in business in 2021. But like any strategy, you need to measure its impact if you want it to be successful. Nina Petrov actions how you can do that in this article from Pixel Productions.

Learn from the best female affiliate marketers

If you want to earn an income through affiliate marketing, it helps to learn from the best. Fortunately, there are a lot of people who are building entire businesses around this concept. And others use it as a solid source of income. Bill Acholla lists the best female affiliate marketers in this blog post.

Prepare your podcast for a multilingual audience

Today’s consumers are increasingly multilingual. This can affect the communication strategies of many companies. But it is especially essential for podcasts. Find out about this trend and how to adjust your podcasting strategy in this GMR transcript post by Beth Worthy. Then see what members of the BizSugar community are saying here.

Increase Sales Using Psychology in Web Design

The design and layout of your website can have a major impact on conversions and sales. It has always been true. But more and more people are aware of the impact of psychology on web design. Learn more in this Crowdspring post by Katie Lundin.

Improve 3D digital experiences

Three-dimensional experiences are increasingly popular with online consumers. This technology is still evolving. Companies are therefore finding new ways to improve it on a daily basis. Discover the concept and get advice for implementing it in this MarTech article by Chris Wood.

Learn more about the Google business profile.

Google My Business has long been a powerful platform for businesses looking to be found online. But the site was recently renamed to Google Business Profile. This change can have a major impact on local businesses. So find out about the updates in this Bright Local post by Alix Coe.

Get paid to buy for others

The concert economy is a major trend for businesses today. Even if you just want to earn some extra cash, there are plenty of opportunities. You can use this income to support your business or just to supplement your income. Find opportunities where you get paid to buy for others in this post on The Work at Home Woman blog by Holly Reisem Hanna.

If you would like to suggest your favorite small business content to consider for a future community roundup, please send your topical tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Image: Depositphotos


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Private ski club runs big surplus and buys new snowmaking equipment, largely with federal COVID aid https://rgbonsai.com/private-ski-club-runs-big-surplus-and-buys-new-snowmaking-equipment-largely-with-federal-covid-aid/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/private-ski-club-runs-big-surplus-and-buys-new-snowmaking-equipment-largely-with-federal-covid-aid/ An exclusive Ontario ski club has racked up an $815,000 surplus after receiving more than half a million dollars in federal wage subsidies during the pandemic, using the windfall to improve its snowmaking system and provide relief. other capital improvements. The Mansfield Ski Club in Mulmur, Ont., about 100 kilometers northwest of Toronto, had a […]]]>

An exclusive Ontario ski club has racked up an $815,000 surplus after receiving more than half a million dollars in federal wage subsidies during the pandemic, using the windfall to improve its snowmaking system and provide relief. other capital improvements.

The Mansfield Ski Club in Mulmur, Ont., about 100 kilometers northwest of Toronto, had a record-breaking 2020-21 fiscal year, according to financial statements obtained by CBC News.

With increased revenue from membership dues, initiation fees and $563,371 in Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), the resulting surplus was 15.6 times the $52,000 reported in the previous fiscal year, when the nonprofit club received $65,645 in support of the CEWS. .

“The strong financial situation this season (mainly thanks to the wage subsidy and the high level of initiation fees) has made essential investment work possible and has also provided us with the funds necessary to replace our old snowmaking compressors. 50, a year ahead of schedule,” club treasurer Gary Walters wrote in a report to members earlier this fall.

Walters described the 2020-21 season as the club’s “best year for new members in several decades”, with the club collecting $492,000 in initiation fees. Mansfield charges new members a one-time buy-in of $15,000 per family.

Even with fewer ski days due to pandemic restrictions, Mansfield’s bottom line improved, with lower operating income more than offset by lower expenses. The club reported overall revenue of $2.889 million, $147,000 more than in the 2019-20 fiscal year.

WATCH | Question raised about private ski clubs’ use of the COVID-19 grant:

Private ski clubs’ use of COVID-19 grant raises questions about pandemic relief

The leaked financial statements of the private Mansfield Ski Club near Toronto have raised questions about how some companies may have used federal pandemic relief funding to bail out their coffers rather than just stay afloat. 2:02

No signs the club broke the rules

A careful reading of the financial statements for the year ending May 31 shows that even if Mansfield had not received government aid, the club would have recorded a surplus of more than $250,000. The non-profit club is exempt from income tax on its income, but not on its investment or property income.

There is no indication that the Mansfield Ski Club violated the rules for qualifying or using the CEWS program.

The grant scheme – under which the government would pay up to 75% of employees’ wages – was launched in April 2020 to help Canadian businesses keep staff on the payroll amid tough COVID-related restrictions -19 were imposed. To qualify, companies simply had to show a decline in revenue during the pandemic, either annually or over particular periods.

The federal government has always said, however, that the program was only intended to support workers’ compensation.

“This money cannot be used for any other purpose,” Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland told a House of Commons committee in late 2020. “The wage subsidy must be used to pay workers. It is very, very clear and we expect companies to comply with this.”

Requests for interviews with Mansfield chief executive Chris Salhany, club chairman Rob Walkowiak and treasurer Gary Walters were declined.

“We are extremely busy getting ready to open and cannot take the time,” Salhany wrote.

Wouldn’t say how many employees received wage subsidy

The club executive also declined to answer a series of written questions about CEWS funds and the budget surplus or specify how many club employees have received aid through the wage subsidy.

The financial statements show Mansfield paid $1,095,674 in salaries and benefits in the 2020-21 fiscal year, down $430,000 from the prior year.

In a video posted late last month, Salhany took members through the changes they can expect when this year’s season kicks off on December 18. Among the upgrades: a new ski-patrol hut, new member washrooms, a new beginners’ area with a magic carpet lift, several new snow cannons and four giant yellow Kaeser compressors to provide “efficient and efficient forced air.” constant” to the system.

A skier descends the slopes of the Mansfield Ski Club. The private club purchased new snowmaking equipment after federal pandemic wage support helped create a large budget surplus. (Mansfield Ski Club/YouTube)

However, not all Mansfield members are happy with the use of the money.

One, who asked not to be identified for fear of repercussions, told CBC News that several people within the club felt the accumulated surplus and its use violated the spirit of the CEWS program.

“That’s the moral element,” the MP said. “It makes no sense. It has nothing to do with COVID.

“It helped privileged members of a private ski club avoid capital expenditures that they would otherwise have had to pay directly.”

CEWS paid out $97.84 billion

Annual dues, fees, and program costs at Mansfield typically range between $8,000 and $10,000 for a family of four. In return, members get access to 17 uncrowded runs with full snow coverage and a ski and race school that has over 100 professionals and instructors.

Among the touted perks are a dining room and bar in the chalet, a yoga studio, a Starbucks outlet, and charging stations for Teslas and other electric cars. Members also enjoy reciprocal privileges at several other ski resorts, golf courses and private clubs in Ontario, including the Royal Canadian Yacht Club of Toronto, the Boulevard Club and the Badminton and Racquet Club.

The sun sets behind the slopes of the Mansfield Ski Club. The club charges $15,000 to join and up to $10,000 more in annual fees. (Mansfield Ski Club/YouTube)

According to federal CEWS websiteOttawa has contributed $97.84 billion through the program, and 456,900 different businesses and organizations have received the grant. More than 137,000 of those payments exceeded $100,000.

National Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillier, who oversees the CEWS program, declined an interview request. But his department, the Canada Revenue Agency, said it had so far completed 700 audits of CEWS recipients and had another 2,500 “in progress”.

In a written statement, the CRA said it was reviewing whether companies “took additional steps to artificially reduce or defer revenue to meet CEWS requirements,” but it would be “premature” to provide. information on how many beneficiaries broke the rules or how much money was recovered.

“The CRA is closely monitoring all audit efforts and intends to report the results to Parliament as requested,” the statement said.

The priority was to disburse the money quickly

Mansfield is not the only private or public leisure club to have received government support during the pandemic.

A CBC News analysis of the federal database of CEWS recipients found listings for 718 golf and country clubs, 65 tennis clubs, 57 ski clubs and 45 yacht clubs. But there are no publicly available details on how much these organizations received, what they did with taxpayers’ money or whether they actually needed the aid.

The federal government has prioritized sending money quickly over spending controls and reviews, said Miles Corak, an Ottawa-based economist who has studied the CEWS program.

A member of the Mansfield Ski Club enjoys a beer. The club offers its members many benefits, including yoga in the chalet, electric car chargers and access to other private golf, racquet and yacht clubs. (Mansfield Ski Club/YouTube)

By the time the funds arrived in spring 2020, many of the most vulnerable businesses and businesses had already laid off staff and closed due to COVID-19 lockdowns, he said.

“There has been a great deal of waste in the funds that have been spent, and I suspect that many public finance economists will see that this program is probably the greatest waste of public funds in post-war Canadian history” , said Corak, who is also a professor of economics at the City University of New York.

“It was a leaky bucket.”

Mansfield’s example seems to characterize “everything that was wrong” with the CEWS program, Corak said.

“The money went to a company that didn’t really need the money,” he said. “The Canadian taxpayer must therefore ask why the federal government is subsidizing an exclusive ski resort.

“A snow machine compressor is not an employee.”


Jonathon Gatehouse can be contacted by email at jonathon.gatehouse@cbc.ca, or through CBC’s digitally encrypted Securedrop system at https://www.cbc.ca/securedrop/.

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Resale rises in holiday gift purchases in December https://rgbonsai.com/resale-rises-in-holiday-gift-purchases-in-december/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/resale-rises-in-holiday-gift-purchases-in-december/ NEW YORK — Used. Like new. Saving. Don’t buy anything. Gently used. There are many ways to describe consumption in the booming resale market. Add “Merry Christmas!” to the list. Resale has taken off among those looking to save the planet and spend less on gifts during what may be the most wasteful time of […]]]>

NEW YORK — Used. Like new. Saving. Don’t buy anything. Gently used. There are many ways to describe consumption in the booming resale market.

Add “Merry Christmas!” to the list.

Resale has taken off among those looking to save the planet and spend less on gifts during what may be the most wasteful time of the year – the December holidays. This year’s supply chain delays provided additional motivation.

“Gifting should be all about thought, and arguably more thought goes into finding a meaningful and interesting second-hand gift for someone than just hitting the ‘buy’ button on something. everyone gets from Amazon,” said sustainability expert Ashlee Piper. and author of “Give a Sh(asterisk)t: Do Good.” Live better. Save the planet.”

One of her favorite gifts was a tattered copy of “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” that a friend found for $2 at a thrift store.

“It’s kitsch, thoughtful and totally unique,” Piper said.

The resale market is far from dominant overall and spans all ages. Industry reports have indicated that recent gains are driven primarily by Gen Z and millennial shoppers.

Players young and old reap the benefits.

Luxury resale market The RealReal, which has more than 23 million members after going public more than two years ago, said it saw a 60% jump last year over the year previous among those who chose gift boxes with purchases during the holiday season. Last month, the online site, which has 16 brick-and-mortar consignment stores in the United States, saw orders for gift sets jump 73% from the same month last year for unbranded jewelry. Those purchases were up 62% for Gucci items and 53% for Louis Vuitton selections, according to company data.

“The stigma is gone,” said Marshal Cohen, consumer behavior and retail analyst for the NPD Group. “There is a new vision of the value of part of the resale product. Gray market sales of new and used items are now reaching new heights. Branding a great item that others can only dream of is the new form of luxury.

Sales of gift cards for online savings giant ThredUp, which went public earlier this year, rose 103% in the first two weeks of December compared to the whole of November, said Erin Wallace, Vice President of Integrated Marketing.

Kristi Marquez, 36, of Jupiter, Fla., has two young daughters. She reduced her gift list from around 20 people to 10 this year after her family opted to buy only for their children. A good three-quarters of his gifts will be resale items. She used Thriftbooks.com and other book retailers to purchase titles she previously owned at deeply discounted prices. Facebook Marketplace and local mom groups have proven successful for toys.

Sometimes, she says, reselling isn’t about the environment or saving money, especially this year.

“At the top of the list of our oldest is the Magic Mixies Magic Cauldron. At first I didn’t realize the toy was so popular and was shocked to see it sold everywhere except at more than double the price. resellers on Amazon and Walmart,” she said. “After wading through potential scammers, I finally got my hands on Poshmark for $99. It’s not the eco-friendly toy we were hoping for and it’s still overpriced, but we’re glad we found the main toy she asked for this year.

The plastic toy, which makes sounds and produces mist after kids create a “potion”, retails for $69.99.

As more retailers added resale as an option, tech intermediaries stepped in to help. One company, List Perfectly, offers tools for resellers to list their wares on 11 marketplaces.

“Resale does not necessarily mean used. Many resellers are reselling new items that are currently in short supply because they have planned their inventory for months to meet holiday shopping demands,” said Clara Albornoz, co-founder and CEO. “Shoppers can see a variety of options, easily compare prices, shop from home, get their items quickly and affordably, and have them delivered directly, usually with the ability to return if something goes wrong.”

Another company, Recurate, allows brands to create their own reselling platforms on their websites.

“Recurate sales during the week of Black Friday and Cyber ​​Monday were more than 50% above average,” said Karin Dillie, vice president of partnerships. She said customers seek out resale items “to satisfy their own search for deals as well as to purchase as gifts.”

Catering specifically to Gen Z, the Galaxy Resale Marketplace offers live broadcasts allowing buyers and sellers to interact in real time. He recently hosted a five-day holiday event involving 40 top sellers.

“By being able to have real-time conversations via live video and SMS messaging, sellers and buyers can build a relationship. This often leads to sellers becoming trusted curators of your wardrobe and vacation shopping,” said Danny Quick, co-founder and CEO.

Sadie Cherney, franchise owner with three Clothes Mentor resale stores in South Carolina, said resale is a market shoppers should be wary of.

His advice: look for brand new items with tags, do your homework on return policies, make sure things like zippers are functional, check for stains and tears and, perhaps most importantly, decide if you will tell the recipient of the gift that you have purchased. resale.

Kahlil Spurlock, 32, of Jersey City, NJ, turned to reselling holiday gifts this year in a bid to reduce his carbon footprint. He used Grailed, a site similar to The RealReal but focused on menswear.

“I was buying for my 20-year-old brother, who buys on resale,” he said. “Some items are so cool, like some street clothes, that you can only find on resale.”

Spurlock bought two brand name items for his younger brother.

None of this is new to Amanda Spencer, 50, in suburban Philadelphia. She’s a longtime resale hunter on Facebook Marketplace, local Buy Nothing groups that offer free items, and events like sales at her church.

This year for Christmas, she found a series of books on Facebook that her daughter wanted. And from a Buy Nothing group, she picked up a bean bag chair her daughter had requested.

“He’s not exactly who cares,” Spencer said.

For her son, she found Minecraft cube building toys at a garage sale.

“Most of the things they’ve bought throughout their lives have been either second-hand items or consignment stores,” Spencer said. “Why bother paying full retail price? »

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Bonsai Tree Memorial Honors the Spirits of Deceased PHNSY Employees > Naval Sea Systems Command > Recorded News Module https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-tree-memorial-honors-the-spirits-of-deceased-phnsy-employees-naval-sea-systems-command-recorded-news-module/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-tree-memorial-honors-the-spirits-of-deceased-phnsy-employees-naval-sea-systems-command-recorded-news-module/ JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii – A memorial planter was unveiled this summer at the Office of Quality Assurance, Code 135, at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility as a gift honoring the memory of Roldan Agustin and Vince Kapoi, Jr. whose Life was unfortunately taken by an active duty Sailor at Graving […]]]>

A memorial planter was unveiled this summer at the Office of Quality Assurance, Code 135, at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility as a gift honoring the memory of Roldan Agustin and Vince Kapoi, Jr. whose Life was unfortunately taken by an active duty Sailor at Graving Dock 2 on December 4, 2019.

Members of Kapoi, Jr.’s family and other Code 135 employees were on hand to view the planter which was inscribed with the words “The NAVSEA NDT community prays for your continued comfort.” The box, which was created by Jason Dorenavant, the manager of NAVSEA’s non-destructive testing and welding programs, felt it was his personal obligation to design and create the planter which is permanently housed in the office. building quality assurance. 1443.

“The idea of ​​the gift was to have something alive and grow,” Dor said. “Bonsai trees are hearty, lively and long-lasting, they need to be cared for and nurtured.”

The memorial planter design had additional assistance from Michael O’Connell, a Code 132 Quality Assurance Specialist at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, and included the U.S. Navy logo embedded in the wood and epoxy sealed. O’Connell used burl maple wood accents to create a visual impression of lava flow, ocean and coral. Inside the planter, Dorénavant chose two bonsai trees, one leaning left and one right to symbolize the enduring spirits of Agustin and Kapoi, Jr..

Additionally, on December 5, 2021, the memorial planter was displayed at a ceremony in which Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro awarded the families of Agustin and Kapoi, Jr., the Angela M. Houtz for fallen civilians. During the ceremony, Del Toro expressed his deepest condolences to his family members. The medal is named after an intelligence analyst who died at the Pentagon in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack.

“Overall, I think it shows that we all care about them and our concern for the well-being of Code 135,” O’Connell said.

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Like small manicured lands, making terrariums at home is beautiful and good for the mind https://rgbonsai.com/like-small-manicured-lands-making-terrariums-at-home-is-beautiful-and-good-for-the-mind/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 16:18:02 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/like-small-manicured-lands-making-terrariums-at-home-is-beautiful-and-good-for-the-mind/ Gardeners “tend” to be happier than most because, among other reasons, like having more vitamin D or being out in the wild, they always have something to look forward to. But undoubtedly one of the most fascinating gardening trends is the popular advent of building and maintaining terrariums – small slices of tropical climate enclosed […]]]>

Gardeners “tend” to be happier than most because, among other reasons, like having more vitamin D or being out in the wild, they always have something to look forward to.

But undoubtedly one of the most fascinating gardening trends is the popular advent of building and maintaining terrariums – small slices of tropical climate enclosed in glass jars, bottles or aquariums that, if properly prepared, can last for decades.

NASA describes a terrarium as a “forest locked in its own little world,” but there is no specific rulebook for the size of a terrarium or what should be kept inside. The “Let’s talk terrariums” Subreddit testifies to this.

This Redditor managed to compress this forest locked in its own little world by the pendant on a necklace, while this one 3D printed special case with beautiful lighting.

Far from being a simple feast for the eyes, tending to a terrarium can actually improve your mood, even just having a plant or two around. will decrease anxiety, and can help refresh the mind after a period of concentration on work.

It was particularly poignant, a terrarium business owner told the BBC, during confinements.

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“I’ve seen a real influx of people wanting to get into horticulture and grow their green thumbs,” says Emma Terrell, of Ottawa, Canada. The Grand Nord Blanc has also experienced a boom in home mushroom cultivation.

Terrell short Urban Botanist where she sells DIY supplies to make terrariums of all kinds.

“People saw it as a way to relax, unwind, be creative, and engage with this innate need within us to engage with nature.”

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There is also a natural geometry, or at least it is believed, plants that make them attractive to look at. All humans tend to prefer things in symmetry or in cohesive patterns like a spiral, and so plant leaves or fern stems may be pleasing to the eye for reasons involving fractals and math rather than just “simple” beauty.

Make a terrarium at home

Making a terrarium is first of all deciding whether you want an open-air terrarium, for succulents, or a closed version.

For an enclosed terrarium, choose a soil substrate that will not grow mold. James Wong, a botanist and the author told the BBC to use kurodama soil, which is typical of bonsai, a species that can also be comfortable in a terrarium. This Redditor used a bonsai tea Fukien / carmona.

Next, pick plants that would be comfortable on the forest floor in the tropics. Simple species like moss and ferns work well.

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“I researched all the different species [of moss], there is only one that is easily accessible and very reliable. It is called Leucobryum glaucum, sold by florists as “bun mousse,” Wong said.

There is a limit in a closed ecosystem to the number of plants that can be nurtured, so fill in the gaps using decorative items like stones, driftwood, or maybe a garden gnome.

NASA for kids suggests using a layer of activated charcoal on top of a rock layer at the bottom of the terrarium, under the ground, to help filter water and prevent mold growth. They say to put the terrarium in indirect light, but Wong says you can use growing light to help if the room is too dark.

BRING this good green news to these newsfeeds …

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Step by step guide to growing bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/step-by-step-guide-to-growing-bonsai/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/step-by-step-guide-to-growing-bonsai/ A bonsai plant the the art of bonsai has been practiced for generations and is a highly symbolic religious activity, with its vital qualities of simplicity, harmony and balance reflected in many parts of Japanese culture and way of life. Bonsai art […]]]>







A bonsai plant





the the art of bonsai has been practiced for generations and is a highly symbolic religious activity, with its vital qualities of simplicity, harmony and balance reflected in many parts of Japanese culture and way of life. Bonsai art has been cultivated for over 2000 years and is inspired by the Chinese art of Penjing, which was transferred to Japan from China, and later carved and influenced by the minimalist Buddhist culture.

So, for those of you who want to grow bonsai at home, here are the steps to grow them:












Step 1

Choose a tree species that suits your climate. Not all bonsai are the same. Many woody perennials and even tropical plants can be made into bonsai,

However, not all species will be suitable for your specific environment. It is essential to consider the climate in which the tree will be grown when choosing a species. Some trees, for example, perish in cold temperatures, while others need sub-freezing temperatures to enter a dormant state and prepare for spring.

One of those trees you can start with if you are new to bonsai growing. These hardy evergreens can be found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and even in the more temperate sections of the Southern Hemisphere.

Additionally, junipers are simple to grow; they respond well to pruning and other “training” efforts and, as evergreens, never shed their leaves. However, they are growing at a snail’s pace.

Pines, spruces and cedars of various types are also often grown as bonsai. Another option is deciduous (hardwood) trees.

2nd step

Decide if you want to grow your bonsai indoors or outdoors.

  • Indoor trees receive less moisture and sunlight, so choose only those that need it the least. Here are some of the trees that will be perfect if you want to grow a bonsai indoors, Hawaiian Umbrella, Serissa, Gardenia, Camellia, Kingsville Boxwood, Ficus.












  • Outdoor plants are those that may require a higher amount of humidity and sun. listed are some of these species of plants, juniper, cypress, cedar, maple, birch, beech, ginkgo, larch, elm.

Step 3

Select the size of your bonsai

Select a tree based on the size you can manage, as bonsai trees come in a wide variety of sizes. Depending on the species, mature trees can measure from 6 inches (15.2 cm) to 3 feet (0.9 m). If you choose to grow your bonsai from a seedling or cutting from another tree, it will start out much smaller. Larger plants require more water, soil and sun, so make sure you have everything you need before you buy.

Step 4

Select the pot

Bonsai is not a species of tree. However, its main appeal is that the trees are grown in pots which limit their growth. The most crucial consideration in determining which pot to use is that the container be large enough to allow adequate soil to cover the plant’s roots.












When you water your tree, the liquid from the soil is absorbed by the roots. You don’t want to put little soil in the pot so the tree roots can’t retain moisture. To prevent root rot, make sure your pot has one or more drainage holes in the bottom. You can also drill them yourself if you have a drill.

  • While your container should be large enough to support your tree, you’ll also want to keep your bonsai nice and tidy. Excessively huge pots could overshadow the tree, creating an odd or mismatched look. Buy a container large enough to accommodate the tree’s roots, but not much larger – the goal is for the pot to aesthetically complement the tree while being relatively unobtrusive visually.

  • Some people choose to start their bonsai trees in basic, functional pots and then transfer them to more sophisticated containers once they are fully grown. This is especially handy if your bonsai species is delicate, as it allows you to put off buying the “right” container until your tree is healthy and beautiful.

Step 5

Prune your tree to the shape you desire to ensure it grows the way you want it to.

Step 6

Learn about trees, their life cycle, and how much moisture and sun they want

Step 7

Uproot trees and clean their roots

Brush away clumps of dirt blocking your view as you clean out the roots. This method benefits from the use of root rakes, chopsticks, tweezers, and other similar equipment.












Step 8

pot the tree

Place the tree the right way up in your new pot. Finish filling the container with fine, well-drained soil or growing medium, making sure to cover the root system of the tree. You can add a final layer of moss or gravel if desired.






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Inside Corona’s epic football game 70 years in the making https://rgbonsai.com/inside-coronas-epic-football-game-70-years-in-the-making/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/inside-coronas-epic-football-game-70-years-in-the-making/ Muse: What was the genesis of this really huge idea? Alejandro Gershberg: We knew how important live football was for Mexico, as well as how much we as a brewing company depend on times of consumption [like big-event game days]. It started with a call. Gustavo Lauria from We Believers called and told me about […]]]>
Muse: What was the genesis of this really huge idea?

Alejandro Gershberg: We knew how important live football was for Mexico, as well as how much we as a brewing company depend on times of consumption [like big-event game days]. It started with a call. Gustavo Lauria from We Believers called and told me about this idea. Without knowing how difficult or impossible it was, we approved it and struck up a 24/7 conversation to make this project a reality.

Can you describe the creative process?

Using images from the past 70 years and over 100 games … [we edited] day and night, seven days a week, for 45 days. The team did a very careful job of selecting the material, collecting and synchronizing the shots. We were also guided by former footballers and historians to create the “Match of Ages”.

What has been your biggest challenge? The scope, the timing, all of that?

The number of people it took to get the images to work with so many images was very difficult. But the biggest challenge was to react quickly because we couldn’t afford to waste time. In the end, either we would succeed or we risk disappointing people.

As a game, did it work any better than expected?

América vs Chivas is the most anticipated match in Mexican football. But what no one had ever imagined was a game made up of all these classics put together, in which the greatest figures of football coexisted … the best goals, the iconic games and the most representative goalkeepers of each era. . What fans might have imagined as a perfect match has come true.

Can you talk about the broadcasting?

On match day, June 7, the game was broadcast in prime time on the nation’s most watched channel and streamed live on the brand’s social media and TV network. It exploded: the game received 97% more mentions than the last game played between the two teams. The “Match of Ages” has become the most watched “classico” in the history of Mexican football, with more than 109 million impressions won, more than 180,000 mentions on social networks. [On the business side] Corona increased its sales by 54%, managing to retain 30,000 employees.

Were you surprised by this performance?

We were surprised and no. We knew we had something good, but we didn’t expect that kind of response. We connected with people. In times of containment, we have brought entertainment with the most popular teams in the country, and the most iconic players in history. We brought a piece of normal life back to a time when football was really lacking in Mexico.

How did the fundraising go?

Thanks to donations from brands such as Aeroméxico, Carl’s Jr., Jumex and Nescafé, the “Match of Ages” broke the barriers of confinement and time. We were able to edit the original sideboards and sell the space to the brands. We offered billboard space during the match, and in return the businesses needed to support the fight against Covid with the resources they could provide, such as meals for doctors or flights for the medical care equipment. At halftime, Televisa sold space, and that was also used to fight Covid. The final tally of donated funds and services exceeded $ 2 million.

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We tried making natto the old fashioned way, and the result was unexpected but delicious 【SoraKitchen】 https://rgbonsai.com/we-tried-making-natto-the-old-fashioned-way-and-the-result-was-unexpected-but-delicious-%e3%80%90sorakitchen%e3%80%91/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/we-tried-making-natto-the-old-fashioned-way-and-the-result-was-unexpected-but-delicious-%e3%80%90sorakitchen%e3%80%91/ Who knew that soybean fermentation was such a delicate process? While most people see natto (fermented soybeans) as little packets of styrofoam – or even on ice cream, on the rare occasions – do you know how it’s actually made or did you want it? do it yourself? Our Japanese-speaking reporter Saya Togashi decided to […]]]>

Who knew that soybean fermentation was such a delicate process?

While most people see natto (fermented soybeans) as little packets of styrofoam – or even on ice cream, on the rare occasions – do you know how it’s actually made or did you want it? do it yourself? Our Japanese-speaking reporter Saya Togashi decided to try natto buy natto making kit by the natural Japanese farmers of Fuudo Farm.

The kit, priced at 1,296 yen (US $ 11.41), contained two bags of dried soybeans and two packs of straw. And that’s all!

Natto is traditionally made by wrapping cooked soybeans in straw and maintaining enough heat for the natto bacteria to thrive, thereby fermenting the soybeans and creating that gooey, gooey dish that has captured so many hearts.

Saya started by soaking the beans overnight in water and then bringing them to a boil the next morning. The instructions said to boil the beans until they were soft enough to be mashed between your fingers, which meant one to two hours of boiling. If you have a pressure cooker, however, you can significantly reduce this time!

She also boiled the straw, but since it was so long, part of it came out of the pot and she had to push it in gradually like spaghetti.

When all the items had been sufficiently boiled, Saya nestled the soybeans in the straw cocoon. She was concerned that the beans would be so hot that they would kill the natto bacteria, but this particular bacteria is quite hardy and can survive up to 100 degrees Celsius (212 degrees Fahrenheit) of heat.

Once the natto cocoon was finished, the actual preparation was over! Now came the task of keep beans warm for at least 24 hours. Yes, 24 full hours. Otherwise, the beans and straw would become too cold to aid the fermentation process.

There are many methods you can use to keep them warm, including the use of hot water bottles, a heater, kairo adhesive pads, etc. Saya had a heat saver bag and some kairo handy, so she tried this method.

Unfortunately, the beans got cold in the process. Maybe it was because they were old, but she kairo did not stay warm for more than a few hours. She tried to save the lot by adding heat as soon as she noticed it, but it was already too late. She eventually decided to let it sit for another 12 hours, per the kit instructions.

In the meantime, she started the second batch of the kit to see if it would get better. She repeated the same process as the first batch, but this time, she used a huge 24 hours kairo it was guaranteed to last long enough.

24 hours passed. She peeked inside the cocoon to see how her beans were doing. It managed to stay warm for 24 hours, but she waited another 12 hours to make sure they had fermented well.

Another look. This time she could see a slimy texture on the beans, which was a good sign!

They looked beautiful! They weren’t as stringy and slimy as the natto you can find in the supermarket, but there was definitely something going on.

The next step was to let them refrigerate for another two days to achieve natto perfection. And then came the long-awaited day to try out its fermented creation. She made some rice and garnished it with her homemade natto.

And when she took a bite …

… They just tasted like soy.

There wasn’t enough bacteria growth to give her that slimy natto flavor she was hoping for. You can see the most naked glow of fermentation, but it’s not enough. She didn’t feel too bad, however, as it was a fairly straightforward creation.

And honestly it was a great bowl of soy rice! She thought it paired perfectly with the dash of soy sauce she had put on it. It was like a premium version of regular soybeans.

By the way, if you’re wondering what happened to the first batch, they started to develop black spots after another 12 hours of fermentation. Saya decided it was best not to open the cocoon.

So even though Saya’s experiment with making homemade natto hasn’t really been a success, she knows what to do next time! Boil them almost until she thinks they are too boiled, then keep that heat toasty for the next 24 hours. If you want to try and get the same results as Saya, you can always add natto flavor by adding natto!

Photos © SoraNews24
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