Bonsai plant – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:22:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Bonsai plant – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 The annual bonsai show will take place this weekend https://rgbonsai.com/the-annual-bonsai-show-will-take-place-this-weekend/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 02:46:19 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-annual-bonsai-show-will-take-place-this-weekend/ A wagtail sitting on top of a wild gardenia bonsai owned by Mike and Jenny Shute. Benjingi, Go-Kan, Moyogi, all can look like a command for Shusi; however, these are styles for bonsai. The idea that all bonsai trees are small may have been the norm for hundreds of years, but the art has changed […]]]>

A wagtail sitting on top of a wild gardenia bonsai owned by Mike and Jenny Shute.

Benjingi, Go-Kan, Moyogi, all can look like a command for Shusi; however, these are styles for bonsai.

The idea that all bonsai trees are small may have been the norm for hundreds of years, but the art has changed with larger trees making their way all over the world. Although the trees are bigger, bonsai enthusiasts still stick to the basics, and yes, the most serious bonsai enthusiasts want a traditional juniper or evergreen in their collection.

With the huge range of trees available in South Africa, bonsai enthusiasts are in for a treat with acacia, coral, wild olive, spekboom and even the mighty baobab which has become a favorite. So whichever you choose, there is a bonsai that will suit your style.

Bonsai have been around for thousands of years. Proof of this is a painting in one of the tombs in Egypt of a pharaoh receiving a bonsai as a gift.

The EP Bonsai Society’s Annual Bonsai Show will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Sherwood Garden Centre, Walker Drive Gqeberha. Doors open Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Demonstrations will take place on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., and on Sunday at 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. There will also be trees, pots, tools, yarn and fertilizer and free advice.

The entrance fee is R20 for adults, R10 per learner and children under 12 can enter for free. For more information contact Jenny on 083 999 1058.

RELEASED: EP BONSAI SOCIETY

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New Bonsai Beverage Co. Coffee Comes to Clearwater | Openings & Closings | Tampa https://rgbonsai.com/new-bonsai-beverage-co-coffee-comes-to-clearwater-openings-closings-tampa/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 18:28:50 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/new-bonsai-beverage-co-coffee-comes-to-clearwater-openings-closings-tampa/ Click to enlarge Photo Via Bonsai Beverage Co. The new Bonsai Beverage Co. cafe will open its first location in Clearwater by the end of the year. Located at 28929 US-Hwy. 19 N, the menu will include small batch roasted coffee drinks and snacks. There are also plans to add homemade kombucha, kava, kratom and […]]]>
Click to enlarge

Photo Via Bonsai Beverage Co.

The new Bonsai Beverage Co. cafe will open its first location in Clearwater by the end of the year.

Located at 28929 US-Hwy. 19 N, the menu will include small batch roasted coffee drinks and snacks. There are also plans to add homemade kombucha, kava, kratom and kefir to the menu.

This spot is co-owned by Ean Neville, Ian O’Neill and Rachael Brinson, three Pinellas County drink lovers.

“We formed Bonsai Beverage Co. in 2021 drinking coffee that just didn’t taste good,” Rachael told Creative Loafing Tampa Bay. “We all collectively believed that we could produce coffee with better taste and atmosphere.”

No exact date has been set for the official debut, although the owners are aiming for a soft opening by the end of the year and a grand opening in January, which will feature vendors and events. The owners hope to open more locations in the future.

But for a preview, Bonsai Beverage Co. will be offering coffee, mugs, and other seasonal goodies at the Dharma Kava Lounge located at 13328 66th St. N in Largo on Tuesday, Nov. 15 from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Dharma Art Show.

For more information on the Bonsai opening, go to the Facebook page or check out @bonsaibeverageco on Instagram

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What Is Cannabis Bonsai? | Grass https://rgbonsai.com/what-is-cannabis-bonsai-grass/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 23:15:54 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/what-is-cannabis-bonsai-grass/ The first thing you need to know is that growing your own cannabis bonsai requires patience and dedication, it’s not difficult, but you have to give yourself to your plant project. To make a cannabis bonsai, a good tip is to harvest a quality cutting, given the quality of the genetics. Now what are the […]]]>

The first thing you need to know is that growing your own cannabis bonsai requires patience and dedication, it’s not difficult, but you have to give yourself to your plant project.

To make a cannabis bonsai, a good tip is to harvest a quality cutting, given the quality of the genetics. Now what are the steps?

Choose the plant: You can opt for any type of cannabis plant, either Sativa or Indica. Our recommendation is to do this with small and compact plants like Purple Punch or Blue Widow. Indicas have a better tendency to work as cannabis bonsai.

Select the pot: To start, you will need pots of 0.5 to 3 liters, which must have holes for drainage. It is not recommended to start bonsai from seed as the roots develop easily.

Choose the floor: Humus or bat guano is recommended. But in general, any soil you would use for outdoor growing can be useful.

Plant the cutting: Proceed with planting the selected cutting. Remember that it must be healthy, otherwise you must stake it with a wooden stick. This will allow you to trellis the main stem, be careful not to damage the roots with the stake, preferably insert them simultaneously.

With a string, tie the cutting to the wooden stick. This string will allow you to guide the stem where you want it to go. You need to straighten the branches and the stem, tying strings or threads and applying tension in the desired direction.

Lighting: You will need to place low power lights, more or less 125 to 250 w, and avoid direct light in order to slow down its growth a little.

Maintenance: To care for your bonsai, you need to constantly prune it and make sure it doesn’t twist too much.

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Cape Town hosts its 10th Annual Bonsai Festival https://rgbonsai.com/cape-town-hosts-its-10th-annual-bonsai-festival/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 15:00:19 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/cape-town-hosts-its-10th-annual-bonsai-festival/ The City’s Recreation and Parks Department was proud to host the 10e Annual Bonsai Festival, in partnership with the Cape Regional Association of Bonsai last weekend. The two-day festival returned to the Jardin de la Compagnie, with a spectacular bonsai display open to the public. The expo organizers aim to raise awareness of the importance […]]]>

The City’s Recreation and Parks Department was proud to host the 10e Annual Bonsai Festival, in partnership with the Cape Regional Association of Bonsai last weekend.

The two-day festival returned to the Jardin de la Compagnie, with a spectacular bonsai display open to the public.

The expo organizers aim to raise awareness of the importance of growing trees in cities and to encourage new participants to learn how to grow bonsai-style trees.

Photo: Cape Town/Twitter

The annual event gives all bonsai clubs and nurseries in the Western Cape the opportunity to display the trees grown by their members in a competition.

Bonsai is a Japanese recreational art of growing trees in small pots and shaping them for beauty. The event took place in the presence of the Consul General of Japan in Cape Town, Mr. Jiro Nishimura.

The festival attracted a large crowd of visitors who took advantage of the good weather and the free demonstrations offered by the experts. This signifies a successful return of the event to the company garden after two years of being limited to a virtual event due to the pandemic.

The pruning and shaping demonstrations offered by locals recognized as masters of the bonsai fraternity were also appreciated by the participants.

Photo: Cape Town/Twitter

Visitors were delighted to be able to purchase their own tree as part of a starter kit, complete with a container and tools to take home for cultivation. By joining the club closest to their neighborhood, newcomers will now have the support of a community of bonsai masters and other enthusiasts to guide them with helpful advice offered at club meetings, which are held usually once a week.

Urbanization requires a change in the perception of environmental conservation. Society must consider new ways to plant trees in order to sustain life with the limited availability of green space.

Photo: Cape Town/Twitter

“The exhibit could not have been in a better location than the Society Garden, as it is a well-known park enjoyed by thousands of residents and visitors each year. The exhibition is a celebration of trees and nature and highlights the importance of conserving and protecting biodiversity and green spaces in urban settings. The art of bonsai cultivation has many benefits, from developing discipline and respect for nature to learning a relaxing and fulfilling hobby.

Sports and recreational activities have historically brought together South Africans of all races, ages and ethnicities. When communities engage in positive hobbies together, it creates a sense of family and belonging. It’s through sports and playing together that we bond, grow and learn from each other,” said Patricia Van der Ross, member of the city’s Mayor’s Committee for Community Services and health.

Below is the list of winners in the following categories:

  • >60cm high: Brett Simon of the Oyama Bonsai Kai Club
  • 40 – 60cm: Brett Simon of the Oyama Bonsai Kai Club
  • 20 – 40cm: Mark Polson, Blaauwberg Bonsai Kai
  • Less than 20cm: Hennie Nel, Cape Bonsai Kai

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Image: Cape Town / Instagram

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The city famous for its pine bonsai trees aims abroad for its customers https://rgbonsai.com/the-city-famous-for-its-pine-bonsai-trees-aims-abroad-for-its-customers/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-city-famous-for-its-pine-bonsai-trees-aims-abroad-for-its-customers/ TAKAMATSU–Kagawa Prefecture officials are taking advantage of a long-sought opportunity to expand their sales network in Europe for black pine bonsai trees grown in the prefecture. In Takamatsu, Kinashicho District is lined with pine bonsai farms, as the prefectural capital is famous for being Japan’s largest pine bonsai production area. The president and head of […]]]>

TAKAMATSU–Kagawa Prefecture officials are taking advantage of a long-sought opportunity to expand their sales network in Europe for black pine bonsai trees grown in the prefecture.

In Takamatsu, Kinashicho District is lined with pine bonsai farms, as the prefectural capital is famous for being Japan’s largest pine bonsai production area.

The president and head of distribution for specialist bonsai importers in the Netherlands and Spain visited the Kandakashojuen farm in the district on September 21.

They carefully examined the many miniature potted plants before stating that the bonsai pieces “seem to have grown well despite the scorching summer heat”.

The president and the official were on a business tour organized by the prefectural government, and they made a succession of purchases from 10 producers in Takamatsu over two days.

A total of 500 bonsai works, including those ordered in advance last year, will be shipped to Europe.

Takamatsu is now attracting a lot of attention from buyers, as black pine bonsai exports to Europe are expected to pick up pace next year.

Although potted pines could previously not be sold in Europe due to quarantine reasons, the restriction was lifted in October 2020 through the efforts of the prefecture and other parties.

Bonsai pieces can now be exported as long as they are checked and kept for two years without any problems being detected when they are registered in a plant quarantine center.

Attending the latest trade session, the chairman of Lodder Bonsai BV, which sells bonsai to more than 20 countries from the Netherlands, said he had high hopes.

“In Europe, although there are more men, there are also women who are very interested in bonsai. It’s very mixed, people who generally love nature, who love plants. A lot of people see bonsai as a hobby and they want to be active,” he said. “WeI am very happy that the black pine is finally available. Many Europeans have seen black pine in magazines, but have never been able to buy it. There is great potential to make people more enthusiastic about black pine.

Cultivation of pine bonsai in Takamatsu began about 200 years ago by transferring a wild tree to a pot. The bonsai here are said to have been sold to hordes of visitors to the famous Kotohiragu Shrine in present-day Kagawa Prefecture in times gone by.

The hot, dry climate was conducive to growing bonsai, and art plants grown in the region account for 80 percent of the national shipment, according to an estimate from Kagawa Prefecture.

The number of bonsai farmers in the prefecture, however, is declining. Data from the prefectural government shows that 196 farmers handled bonsai in 2021, while 300 or more engaged in the practice in 2000 and earlier.

Farmers are struggling to find their successors amid a prolonged decline in domestic demand.

“Many people owned bonsai trees in Japan because it was considered representative of high social status, but that demand has dropped,” said Satoru Oro, president of the Takamatsu Bonsai Export Promotion Association. “We will take advantage of this coveted opportunity to export bonsai trees to Europe to preserve bonsai cultivation in Takamatsu.”

Oro said a series of European agents, apart from the two people from the last tour, appeared to view the bonsai.

Kagawa Prefecture is also stepping up its promotion campaign.

Bonsai trees from the prefecture were exhibited for the first time at the Floriade 2022 Gardening Expo in June this year in the Netherlands.

Around 2,000 visitors visited the Japan stand daily, and a horticulturist’s pruning demonstration drew crowds of onlookers.

“The word ‘bonsai’ seemed to be well known to locals, like sushi, and we feel there is potential demand,” said a representative from the prefecture’s local specialties promotion division.

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Local Bonsai Club can teach you how to take better care of your trees https://rgbonsai.com/local-bonsai-club-can-teach-you-how-to-take-better-care-of-your-trees/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/local-bonsai-club-can-teach-you-how-to-take-better-care-of-your-trees/ Bonsai Club members. The local bonsai club meets on Saturdays to work on various trees to shape them into bonsai and help others develop their trees. They also teach the proper way to wire and bend branches. Kevin Beech and Neels Schmall with his 38 year old bonsai tree. “It’s a relaxing and rewarding hobby. […]]]>

The local bonsai club meets on Saturdays to work on various trees to shape them into bonsai and help others develop their trees. They also teach the proper way to wire and bend branches.

Kevin Beech and Neels Schmall with his 38 year old bonsai tree.

“It’s a relaxing and rewarding hobby. The Chinese started with bonsai and the Japanese refined it. It’s a world-famous hobby,” said one of the members, Marlene Visagie.

Braam Hartslief, David Jacobs, Allen Scheffer and Natacha Boshoff.

Although the word ‘Bon-sai’ is Japanese, the art it describes has its origins in the Chinese Empire.

Hannes Pretorius with a Black Monkey Thorn tree.

By the year 700 AD, the Chinese had begun the art of ‘Pun-sai’ using special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers.

Marlene would like to expand the club and try to work primarily on native trees. “The goal is to propagate three trees out of one. In the bags is peat moss, which must be wet all the time to create roots. After a season or two (if roots have developed), it will be cut from the parent plant, creating a new plant.

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Prepare the LEGO 10281 bonsai tree for spooky season https://rgbonsai.com/prepare-the-lego-10281-bonsai-tree-for-spooky-season/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 08:25:25 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/prepare-the-lego-10281-bonsai-tree-for-spooky-season/ Although LEGO 10281 Bonsai Tree comes with its own customization options, Halloween requires a new color scheme for the set. With the option of having a bonsai with pink flowers or green leaves, 10281 Bonsai Tree can change just like the real plant. However, if you want to go a step further with pieces outside […]]]>

Although LEGO 10281 Bonsai Tree comes with its own customization options, Halloween requires a new color scheme for the set.

With the option of having a bonsai with pink flowers or green leaves, 10281 Bonsai Tree can change just like the real plant. However, if you want to go a step further with pieces outside the set, you can have a different colored bonsai for each season of the year.

That’s exactly what Reddit user u/dito_27 did in a recent custom build shared with LEGO Reddit. Using a variety of brown, yellow and orange parts, they gave 10281 Bonsai Tree a fall makeover.

To make things even scarier, there are also pumpkins littering the ground and spiders perched on the branches. To complete the whole exhibit, they also added a scarecrow with the head of Jack O’Lantern, complete with a pitchfork.

Image: u/dito_27

While they didn’t share specific instructions, another Reddit user explained where to get the extra pieces to recreate the look on your own.

“The dark brown pieces are in The Upside Down 75810,” u/Mescad wrote. “Dark orange pieces are spread across multiple sets, but the easiest way to get a lot of them is 21318 Tree House. Bright light orange leaves are scattered across multiple sets, but most abundant in 40524 Sunflowers. But in outside of sets, Bricklink and/or Pick A Brick are cheaper options.

Whether you choose to make your own version or follow their lead, 10281 Bonsai Tree is an easy set to customize throughout the year.

Support the work that Brick Fanatics made by purchasing your LEGO Star Wars sets through one of our affiliate links – thank you!

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What makes bonsai so expensive? https://rgbonsai.com/what-makes-bonsai-so-expensive/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 05:31:18 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/what-makes-bonsai-so-expensive/ Bonsai trees are among the most elegant and expensive trees on the market. A bonsai tree is an art form originating in 6th century China and requires many years of education and many hours a day of cultivation. On the one hand, bonsai trees are indeed miniature trees that represent the authentic beauty and majesty […]]]>

Bonsai trees are among the most elegant and expensive trees on the market. A bonsai tree is an art form originating in 6th century China and requires many years of education and many hours a day of cultivation.

On the one hand, bonsai trees are indeed miniature trees that represent the authentic beauty and majesty of living nature when grown in a small container. But apart from the small size, it’s the full range of care, attention, dedication, knowledge and artistic skill required to create a bonsai masterpiece that often goes unseen by the eye. eye.

What makes them so expensive?


Like many works of art, bonsai trees come at a high price. At the 2012 International Bonsai Convention, a tree was on sale for 100 million yen, or just under $1 million. Bonsai trees are a form of artistic expression, different from other types of plants you can buy at the nursery.

Image source: allthingsbonsai

When you buy a bonsai tree, you are also buying a piece of the artist’s vision, but unlike many other works of art made in days, weeks, or even years, bonsai art is created over decades. , and sometimes even centuries. Bonsai have a trademark aesthetic. They are often placed in large pots with room for other bonsai trees so they can grow among trees and grass to simulate a small forest.

Read more: Kellogg’s launches Insta-Bowl cereal and here’s what you need to add

What is the process of dwarfism?

Dwarfism involves growing a regular tree to create a perfect miniature in a small pot. The practice of creating tiny trees is due to the complicated and labor-intensive process required to ensure that the various trees engage with each other.

Yamadori is the Japanese practice of collecting bonsai trees that grow organically in the wild. Some trees grown in the wild create their bonsai trees, based on the complex root system underground.

Image source: Floregeus

It is extremely rare to find trees raised in the Yamadori method as they grow in very remote locations. Trees harvested using the Yamadori method have a low survival rate when sold in artificial environments.

Read more: Quality Streets packaging gets an A – Here’s how!

Bonsai in Pakistan and its price

Bonsai trees in Pakistan can cost between 5,000 PKR and 250,000 PKR. Most often they are imported to Pakistan. However, small companies also grow the plants on their own. Different cities in Pakistan, including Karachi and Multan, hold several exhibitions to help people better understand and learn the art of bonsai cultivation.

Stay tuned Marquesynario for the latest news and updates.


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More bonsai trees in Longwood – Chadds Ford Live https://rgbonsai.com/more-bonsai-trees-in-longwood-chadds-ford-live/ Sat, 08 Oct 2022 13:49:19 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/more-bonsai-trees-in-longwood-chadds-ford-live/ Japanese white pine (Pinus parviflora ‘Miyajima’) in root-on-rock style. 24 inches. Developed by Kimura Masahiko. (Courtesy of Longwood Gardens/Hank Davis.) Longwood Gardens today announced that Doug Paul, founder of The Kennett Collection – the finest and largest private collection of bonsai and bonsai-related artifacts outside of Asia – has made a donation and bequest transformers. […]]]>

Longwood Gardens today announced that Doug Paul, founder of The Kennett Collection – the finest and largest private collection of bonsai and bonsai-related artifacts outside of Asia – has made a donation and bequest transformers. Received in two parts, an initial donation will include 50 bonsai donated to Longwood over the next two years, as well as an annual cash donation to support their upkeep. The second part of the donation is a bequest, which will provide an additional 100 specimens, including kicho bonsai or important bonsai masterpieces because of their beauty or rarity – and $1 million for an endowment for the ongoing maintenance of the collection, as well as additional acquisitions. The bequest will more than double the size of Longwood’s collection. Most importantly, it will add significant examples of rare Japanese tree species, making Longwood the premier collection of Japanese-trained bonsai trees on public view in the United States.

“These significant bonsai trees, which have been painstakingly and painstakingly trained, will make Longwood’s collection one of the most important in the country,” said Paul B. Redman, president and CEO of Longwood Gardens.

Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’) in situ at the Kennett Collection. (Courtesy of Longwood Gardens/Phil Bradshaw.)

“The first 50 specimens will expand the breadth and depth of our existing collection of 78 bonsai trees, best known for the diversity of our flowering species and for four remarkable trees developed by artist Yuri Yoshimura. We are extremely grateful to Doug Paul for this transformative gift and the faith he shows in our bonsai program by entrusting us with these important living works of art.

The Kennett collection, which began in 1999, now includes 1,200 specimens that span the bonsai spectrum in terms of sizes, styles and species. The world’s leading bonsai experts have taken care of the collection, which also stands out for the number of trees that have been invited to be displayed at the Kokufu Bonsai Exhibition and the number of trees that are “Registered Masterpiece Bonsai” by the Nippon Bonsai Association.

The first 50 trees to enter the Longwood Collection over the next two years are particularly notable for their lineage, including examples from many of Japan’s most famous nurseries, including the Chinsho-en nursery run by the Nakanishi family in Takamatsu, as well as world-famous bonsai trees, including Kimura Masahiko, known as “The Magician”; Suzuki Shinji of Japan; and Suthin Sukosolvisit from Boston. The gift will also include breathtaking Omono or “Very large” bonsai, three to four feet tall and weighing a few hundred pounds each.

Seven of these bonsai will go on display immediately at the Longwood Conservatory, where they can be viewed until November 13, 2022. Particularly noteworthy specimens include:

  • a trident maple (Acer buergerianum) in the root over rock style, popularized over 100 years ago in the Nagoya area of ​​Japan. This specimen was developed by Boston-based bonsai artist Suthin Sukosolvisit, who is considered by many to be the best trained non-Japanese artist in the western world. The balance and movement of the roots up and down the rock is close to ideal, and the tree has reached a superb level of maturity with an incredibly dense canopy of well-branched twigs and branches.
  • Japanese white pine (Pinus parviflora’Miyajima’), which was designed by renowned bonsai artist Kimura Masahiko. Over many years, it reshaped branches and developed growth to complement the way roots grip rocks. After the specimen’s difficult journey to the United States, Mr. Kimura’s first foreign apprentice, Marco Invernizzi, returned the tree to health.
  • a Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii), considered one of the most important species in Japan and revered for its vigor and longevity. This specimen, which stands 20 inches tall and in the straight style, was originally trained under the care of the internationally renowned Suzuki Shinji.
  • a Satsuki hybrid azalea (Rhododendron’kinsai’) of the kinsai variety, known for the resemblance of its flowers to a firecracker – a distinctive red flower with tassels. This superb specimen, originating from the garden of Kunio Kobayashi, founder of the Shunkaen Bonsai Museum in Japan, was trained in the informal upright style and stands out for its distinctive branching structure and muscular trunk with sinuous veins.

Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii ‘Kotobuki’) in oblique style. 28 inches. Developed by Chinsho-en nursery in Takamatsu, Japan. (Courtesy of Longwood Gardens/Hank Davis.)

“I am delighted to donate specimens from the Kennett collection to Longwood,” said donor Doug Paul. “I have spent many happy years managing these bonsai trees and sharing them with other bonsai connoisseurs at the Kokufu Exhibition – the Westminster Dog Show of the bonsai world. I now look forward to a wider audience can enjoy their beauty and splendor in Longwood.

“Mr. Paul has been able to do what no one else has done in the United States, which is to import, maintain and improve specimens from Japan of the highest quality,” said Peter Warren, the UK’s foremost bonsai professional, “Once the Kennett Collection trees are located in Longwood, it will undoubtedly be one of the top three collections in the United States. All the trees in the collection hold a unique and prestigious place in the history of bonsai, spanning many generations.”

The donation will also include bonsai-related items, including the containers in which bonsai are trained. In the initial donation of 50 bonsai trees, there are notable examples of American bonsai ceramists Sara Rayner and Nick Lenz, who was also a famous bonsai artist. Together, the bonsai and the containers form a harmonious picture.

The majority of the 50 bonsai trees in the Kennett Collection giveaway will be on long-term display during the grand opening of Longwood reinvented end of 2024, a sweeping yet deeply sensitive transformation of 17 acres of the gardens’ central visitor area. As part of this expansion, a new outdoor Bonsai courtyard will be built next to the new West Conservatory. Hedges and charred wood walls will create an intimate gallery-like space, where dozens of bonsai trees will be displayed on freestanding stands against dark backdrops that showcase their shapes, foliage and seasonal blooms.

The gift is one of the most comprehensive and generous that Longwood has received as part of the Pierre S. and Alice du Pont Gardens Founders’ Circle, which recognizes and honors people who make the thoughtful decision to include Longwood Gardens in their real estate projects.


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It’s raining bonsai in Longwood Gardens https://rgbonsai.com/its-raining-bonsai-in-longwood-gardens/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 21:27:18 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/its-raining-bonsai-in-longwood-gardens/ A Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’) from the Kennett collection is among the plants that will be donated to Longwood Gardens. Longwood Gardens this week received a donation of 150 extraordinary bonsai trees and will receive a $1 million bequest to care for the distinguished Kennett Collection. Hailing the donation as the finest private bonsai […]]]>

A Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’) from the Kennett collection is among the plants that will be donated to Longwood Gardens.

Longwood Gardens this week received a donation of 150 extraordinary bonsai trees and will receive a $1 million bequest to care for the distinguished Kennett Collection.

Hailing the donation as the finest private bonsai collection in the western world, Longwood officials said the addition elevates the garden’s collection to a global level.

“These important bonsai trees, which have been carefully and thoughtfully trained, will make Longwood’s collection one of the most important in the country,” said Paul B. Redman, General Manager of Longwood Gardens. “We are extremely grateful to Doug Paul for this transformative gift and the faith he shows in our bonsai program by entrusting us with these
important living works of art.

Bonsai are ornamental trees or shrubs grown in pots and artificially prevented from reaching normal size. They are prized as works of art for their beauty, which often contradicts what one might consider to be the standards of the gardening world.

Longwood, a former Du Pont estate in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, displayed examples from its existing collection of 78, known for the diversity of flowering species and four remarkable trees developed by artist Yuri Yoshimura, in individual frames of shadow boxes that rival a display in museums.

A small plant that sprouted a full-size pomegranate has fascinated visitors for years.

Part of the gardens’ $250 million Longwood Reimagined project is to create a new outdoor Bonsai courtyard and the Kennett collection will be the centerpiece of this exhibit when it opens in 2024.

Paul’s gift will come in two parts. The first concerns the 50 plants that will be donated to Longwood over the next two years and money to support their upkeep.

Longwood Gardens Bonsai Legacy

The second will be a bequest of 100 additional specimens and an endowment of $1 million for ongoing maintenance of the collection and additional acquisitions. It will include related parts, such as containers used for display.

Among the plants Paul is donating are those called bonsai kicho or important bonsai masterpieces because of their beauty or rarity, according to a press release.

“Most importantly,” the Longwood Gardens statement said, “it will add significant examples of rare Japanese tree species, making Longwood Gardens the premier collection of Japanese-trained bonsai on public view in the United States. .”

“I am delighted to donate specimens from the Kennett collection to Longwood,” said Paul. “I have spent many happy years managing these bonsai trees and sharing them with other bonsai connoisseurs at the Kokufu Show, the Westminster dog show of the bonsai world. I now look forward to an audience wider can enjoy their beauty and splendor in Longwood.

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Paul started the Kennett collection in 1999. It now has 1,200 specimens that have been cared for by the world’s leading bonsai experts.

Many have been invited to be exhibited at the Kokufu Bonsai Exhibition and have been designated “Registered Masterpiece Bonsai” by the Nippon Bonsai Association.

“Paul has been able to do what no one else has done in the United States, which is to import, maintain and improve specimens from Japan of the highest quality,” said Peter Warren, the top professional at the bonsai in the UK. “Once the Kennett Collection trees are located in Longwood, it will undoubtedly be one of the top three collections in the United States. All of the trees in the collection hold a unique and prestigious place in bonsai history. , over several generations.

The first 50 trees arriving in the next two years include examples from many of Japan’s most famous nurseries, including the Chinsho-en nursery run by the Nakanishi family in Takamatsu as well as plants from world-renowned bonsai artists. , such as Kimura Masahiko; Suzuki Shinji of Japan; and Suthin Sukosolvisit from Boston.

The giveaway will also include jaw-dropping Omono or “extra-tall” bonsai trees, standing three to four feet tall and weighing a few hundred pounds each.

Seven of these bonsai will be immediately displayed at the Longwood Conservatory, where they can be
visible until November 13, 2022.

They understand:

Longwood Gardens Kennett Bonsai Collection

An 18 inch root over rock style trident maple, developed by Suthin Sukosolvisit.

A trident maple (Acer buergerianum) in the root-on-rock style was popularized over 100 years ago in the Nagoya region of Japan. This specimen was developed by Boston bonsai artist Suthin Sukosolvisit, who is considered by many to be the best trained non-Japanese artist in the western world. The balance and movement of the roots up and down the rock is close to ideal, and the tree has reached a superb level of maturity with an incredibly dense canopy of well-branched twigs and branches.

Longwood Gardens Bonsai Collection Kennett

A 24 inch Japanese white pine in the root-on-rock style, developed by Kimura Masahiko.

A Japanese white pine (Pinus parviflora ‘Miyajima’), designed by renowned bonsai artist Kimura Masahiko. Over many years, it reshaped branches and developed growth to complement the way roots grip rocks. After the specimen’s difficult journey to the United States, Masahiko’s first foreign apprentice, Marco Invernizzi, returned the tree to health.

Longwood Gardens Bonsai Collection Kennett

A 20 inch Japanese black pine in the vertical style, originally formed by Suzuki Shinji

The Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii) is considered one of the most important species in Japan and is revered for its vigor and longevity. This specimen, which stands 20 inches tall and in the straight style, was originally trained under the care of the internationally renowned Suzuki Shinji.

Longwood Gardens Bonsai Collection Kennett

A 30-inch Satsuki hybrid azalea in the informal upright style, developed by Kunio Kobayashi

A hybrid Satsuki azalea (Rhododendron ‘kinsai’) of the kinsai variety, which is known for the resemblance of its flowers to a firecracker – a distinctive red flower with acorns. This superb specimen, originating from the garden of Kunio Kobayashi, founder of the Shunkaen Bonsai Museum in Japan, was trained in the informal upright style and stands out for its distinctive branching structure and muscular trunk with sinuous veins.

The majority of the 50 bonsai trees in the Kennett Collection giveaway will go on long-term display during the grand opening of Longwood Reimagined in late 2024.

The new outdoor Bonsai Courtyard will be built next to the new West Conservatory. Hedges and charred wood walls will create an intimate gallery-like space, where dozens of bonsai trees will be displayed on freestanding pedestals against dark backdrops that showcase their shapes, foliage and seasonal blooms, according to Longwood.

The Longwood Gardens Bonsai collection began in 1959, five years after the death of founder Pierre S. du Pont. Inspired by a continuing education program led by renowned bonsai artist Yuji Yoshimura, Longwood management decided to begin building a collection.

Starting with 13 trees purchased from Yoshimura, the collection has now grown to 78 trees with 50 species represented. The Longwood collection is notable for the significance of the flora of its local landscape. The oldest trees in the collection have been in formation for over 110 years.

Nine styles are represented, including straight, informal straight, waterfall, raft, forest, root on rock, broom, tilt, and literate.

Longwood also has tropical trees, eight of which were added in 2021 and include notable examples of a tigerbark fig, Ficus retusa, with aerial roots; a Vietnamese blue tree,
Trifidacanthus unifoliolatus, with fragrant purple flowers; and a desert rose, Adenium obesum, an African succulent with bicolor pink flowers.

The collection also includes a small but significant group of eight Japanese imports.

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