Bonsai plant http://rgbonsai.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 23:46:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Bonsai plant http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 The Biology of Bonsai: The Science Behind the Traditional Japanese Art Form https://rgbonsai.com/the-biology-of-bonsai-the-science-behind-the-traditional-japanese-art-form/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 11:02:18 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-biology-of-bonsai-the-science-behind-the-traditional-japanese-art-form/ The art of bonsai originated in China. Subsequently refined in Japan, his techniques produce miniature trees that provide aesthetic pleasure to people throughout Asia and the world beyond. This appreciation is reflected in the street couple interview footage incorporated into “The Biology Behind Bonsai Trees”, the above video from Youtuber Jonny Lim, better known as […]]]>

The art of bonsai originated in China. Subsequently refined in Japan, his techniques produce miniature trees that provide aesthetic pleasure to people throughout Asia and the world beyond. This appreciation is reflected in the street couple interview footage incorporated into “The Biology Behind Bonsai Trees”, the above video from Youtuber Jonny Lim, better known as The Backpacking Biologist. Not only does Lim garner positive bonsai opinions around Los Angeles, but he also finds a bonsai nursery in that same city run by Bob Pressler, who has spent more than half a century mastering the art.

Even Pressler admits that he doesn’t fully understand bonsai biology. Lim’s search for scientific answers sends him to “something called the apical meristem.” It is the part of the tree made up of “stem cells found at the tips of shoots and roots”. Stem cells, as you may recall from their long stint in the news a few years ago, have the potential to transform into any type of cell.

The cells of bonsai trees are the same size as those of ordinary trees, according to research, but thanks to the deliberate cutting of the roots and the resulting restriction of nutrients to the apical meristem, their leaves are composed of fewer cells in total. Lim draws an analogy with baking cookies of different sizes: “The components are exactly the same. The only difference is that bonsai have less starting material.

Having gained his own appreciation for bonsai, Lim also becomes poetic about how these miniature trees “still grow in the face of adversity, and they do so perfectly.” But as one commentator responds, “Why recreate adversity?” Claiming that the process “crippled the trees for mere aesthetics,” this individual presents one of the known cases against bonsai. But this case, according to the experts Lim consults, is based on some common misconceptions about the processes involved: that the wires used to position the branches “torture” the trees, for example. But as others point out, do those making these anti-bonsai arguments feel equally pained by the many lawns that are mowed each week?

Related content:

The art and philosophy of bonsai

This 392-year-old bonsai survived the Hiroshima atomic explosion and is still thriving today: the power of resilience

What makes the art of bonsai so expensive? : $1 million for a bonsai tree and $32,000 for bonsai scissors

The art of creating a bonsai: a year condensed into 22 fascinating minutes

Daisugi, the 600-year-old Japanese technique of growing trees from other trees, creating perfectly straight wood

Digital animation compares tree sizes: from 3-inch bonsai to 300-foot redwood

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts about cities, language and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter city ​​books, the book The Stateless City: A Walk Through 21st Century Los Angeles and the video series The city in cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshallon Facebook or Instagram.

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Discover the Intriguing Benefits of Adding a Bonsai Tree to Your Home https://rgbonsai.com/discover-the-intriguing-benefits-of-adding-a-bonsai-tree-to-your-home/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:01:02 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/discover-the-intriguing-benefits-of-adding-a-bonsai-tree-to-your-home/ It’s no mystery that bonsai trees are a joy to have around as they lend a quirky look to the spaces where they are placed. However, these adorable pals offer more than just entertainment; they also offer several physical, spiritual and personal benefits! Bonsai trees are a wonderful way to incorporate nature into your home, […]]]>

It’s no mystery that bonsai trees are a joy to have around as they lend a quirky look to the spaces where they are placed. However, these adorable pals offer more than just entertainment; they also offer several physical, spiritual and personal benefits! Bonsai trees are a wonderful way to incorporate nature into your home, as they are a wonderful blend of aesthetic beauty.

Here we bring you 4 benefits of adding a bonsai to your home.

1. They can help relieve stress

Interaction with plants has been proven to help humans relax. Interacting with a bonsai can help lower blood pressure and reduce psychological stress and anxiety. Bonsai can put you at ease and relax your mood.

Purifies the air

2. They help purify the air

Plants are essential to Earth’s survival because they produce oxygen by absorbing carbon dioxide through photosynthesis. Many plants, including Bonsai, are known for their ability to reduce indoor air pollution. When you have bonsai in your home, the air is kept clean.

3. They help retain moisture

Humidity is one of the many characteristics that bonsai trees possess. Bonsai trees thrive in a moist, humid atmosphere. Our indoor environments are often relatively dry, with low relative humidity, due to indoor heating and cooling. One of the benefits of bonsai is that it increases the humidity in your indoor environment. Sore throats, coughs, and dry skin can all be reduced by keeping these herbs indoors.

Welfare

4. They help improve our general well-being

It is true that being close to nature is linked to a person’s pleasure and well-being. You won’t even notice much at first, but staying close to nature will gradually improve your life. The presence of plants has been shown to have a good impact on everything from anxiety levels to productivity and mood.

Bonsai has a number of health benefits that encourage people to lead healthy lives. This plant has therapeutic powers, which makes it a perfect herb for improving mental and physical health.

Also read: 5 types of plants you can use to create a beautiful garden on your balcony

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Find indoor bonsai in the Marin Bonsai Club beginners course – Marin Independent Journal https://rgbonsai.com/find-indoor-bonsai-in-the-marin-bonsai-club-beginners-course-marin-independent-journal/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 19:00:36 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/find-indoor-bonsai-in-the-marin-bonsai-club-beginners-course-marin-independent-journal/ In this age of oversizing and instant gratification, the intricate and patient art of bonsai could easily be overlooked, but not if the Marin Bonsai Club has anything to say about it. The club, founded 65 years ago and now with 50 members, offers two evening classes in July to encourage Marin residents to think […]]]>

In this age of oversizing and instant gratification, the intricate and patient art of bonsai could easily be overlooked, but not if the Marin Bonsai Club has anything to say about it.

The club, founded 65 years ago and now with 50 members, offers two evening classes in July to encourage Marin residents to think small and grow a tree.

“Students will learn the basics of turning a pre-bonsai tree into something that will grow into a beautiful bonsai tree that could be passed on to the next generation,” says Tung Dao, Novato resident and president of the Marin Bonsai Club.

Dao grew up with a mother who was an avid gardener, so he wasn’t intimidated when, in college, he bought a bonsai growing kit from seeds. Later, he says, he would learn that growing bonsai from seed is “the slowest way to make bonsai.”

That won’t happen in these Marin Bonsai Club workshops.

Each student will receive a tree suitable for beginners, planting materials and instructions from the more experienced members of the club. Classes will be limited to 8 or 10 students.

Bonsai, the Japanese art form of growing and shaping trees into miniaturized forms, “has recently reached all corners of the world, with each region adapting bonsai to their local trees and creating new styles never seen before.” , explains Dao. . “It’s a love shared around the world for trees and the joy of creating one.”

Photo by Diane Matzen

A juniper created during a previous bonsai workshop by the Marin Bonsai Club.

While, says Dao, “people have experimented with exotic and unconventional bonsai, such as rosemary, grape, local species and even poison oak,” most bonsai usually focus on plants that have a woody trunk. which can be trained to be small, with the most popular species being Japanese black pine, Japanese maple and junipers.

“We generally appreciate interesting trunks, beautiful branch development, and sometimes the history of a tree can play a role,” he says.

And this is where skills and training come into play.

“Bonsai is easy to learn and do, but it takes a lifetime to master and even masters are continually learning to the point of realizing how much they don’t know and are really still beginners,” says- he. “How’s that for a Zen riddle?”

Susan Sullivan, who joined the MBC club four years ago, did so after taking one of its beginner workshops.

“We each received a juniper and learned how to find the bonsai hidden inside,” she recalls. “We pruned and wired with a lot of help from our teachers and over the next four years I brought my tree to club meetings where members helped me prune, wire and repot my tree.”

Today, with patience and the help of the club, she also manages to grow several other bonsai trees.

“Bonsai artists should start with patience and an appreciation for the trees,” Dao explains. “People have to learn how and when to water them and when to work on them. Trees need to grow and beginners tend to overwork their trees.

Beginners will learn that bonsai trees do best outdoors in a sunny spot, that a water check should be done daily, and that a senior member should supervise pruning and other major operations.

Trees, he notes, “require a little more care and attention than a pet because they cannot communicate with you if something is wrong, but the reward for the successful development of a bonsai is however extremely satisfying”.

The president of the Marin Bonsai Club, Tung Dao de Novato, with his collection of 30 bonsai trees.  (Photo by Tung Dao)

Photo by Tung Dao

The president of the Marin Bonsai Club, Tung Dao, from Novato, with his collection of 30 bonsai trees.

Candace Key, former president of MBC, agrees.

“Bonsai trees are fascinating to everyone because of the successful illusion of a mature tree growing in a pot,” she says. “It seems like magic, especially when they learn that those oaks, junipers, maples, really all the trees we’re creating bonsai with would be mature trees if we planted them in the ground.”

Details: The Marin Bonsai Club Beginners Bonsai Workshop will be held from 7-9:30 p.m. July 19-26 at the Terra Linda Community Center, Room 4, 670 Del Ganado Road in San Rafael. The cost is $65, $55 for club members. Reservations are required either online or by sending a check with your name and phone number to MBC at PO Box 1461 in Ross. For more information, visit marinbonsai.org.

Marin Bonsai Club meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at the Terra Linda Community Center. Membership is $45, $65 for families and $25 for students. Membership includes opportunities to observe demonstrations, one-on-one instruction, and field trips to nurseries.

Show off

If you have a beautiful or interesting Marin garden or a newly designed Marin house, I would love to hear about it.

Please send an email describing one (or both), what you like best, and a photo or two. I will publish the best in the next columns. Your name will be published and you must be over 18 and a resident of Marin.

Unmissable event

• Bid on one of 17 peace signs, decorated by local high school students, at the Students4Peace art auction from June 27 to July 10 on arizae.org and all proceeds will go to humanitarian charities in Ukraine . The decorated peace signs will also be on display at the Marin County Fair June 30-July 4.

PJ Bremier writes on home, garden, design and entertainment topics every Saturday. She can be contacted at PO Box 412, Kentfield 94914, or at pj@pjbremier.com.

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Cultural shorts: art exhibitions, bonsai exhibition, etc. https://rgbonsai.com/cultural-shorts-art-exhibitions-bonsai-exhibition-etc/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 12:06:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/cultural-shorts-art-exhibitions-bonsai-exhibition-etc/ MANILA — Here are a few events that might be of interest to art and culture lovers. These are not endorsed by ABS-CBN News. ARTABLADO OPENS A BASE IN ANTIPOLO Handout Robinsons Land’s ARTablado has established a base at Robinsons Place Antipolo in Rizal. For her inaugural show, she presents “Sangkutsa: Ikalawang Yugto” until June […]]]>

MANILA — Here are a few events that might be of interest to art and culture lovers.

These are not endorsed by ABS-CBN News.

ARTABLADO OPENS A BASE IN ANTIPOLO

Handout

Robinsons Land’s ARTablado has established a base at Robinsons Place Antipolo in Rizal.

For her inaugural show, she presents “Sangkutsa: Ikalawang Yugto” until June 15.

The show comes after the success of the group exhibition “Sangkutsa” at ARTablado Robinsons Galleria last April.

For the new edition, the members of Sining Rizal focus on the way of life and the cultural momentum of the inhabitants of the province of Rizal.

Participating artists include Bong Anore, Rey Punelas, Oiet Aramil, Jovito Andres, Berny Supsupin, Totong Francisco, Charlie Val, Jan Michael Ong, Ambhet Lugtu, Reggie Lim, Onak Limayo, Gerry Marasigan, Ding Jovellano, Jonalyn Montero, Jun Tiongco, Roger Fulgado, Bello Pasa Jr., Roland delos Santos and Omer delos Santos.

CCP ARTHOUSE CINEMA SCREENINGS

Handout
Handout

Viewers are invited to defend the life and struggles of the LGBTQIA+ community through the screening of selected films from Cinemalaya and Gawad Altenatibo this June 10 at 2 p.m. at Tanghalang Manuel Conde.

On the program, “F#@*bois” by Eduardo Roy and the short films “My Mamily” by Cha Roque and “Blue Is Not My Favorite Color” by Vahn Leinard Pascual.

Vaccination ID cards and the wearing of face masks are required for those attending screenings, with safety protocols to be implemented at all times while on site.

CRIMSON BORACAY YOUTH ARTS PROGRAM

Crimson Resort and Spa Boracay recently featured 10 young local artists who are nurtured through its Arts in Youth program.

They are currently under the tutelage of Crimson Boracay General Manager Patrick Manthe and Artist-in-Residence Eric Egualada, and were selected based on their drawing and painting skills.

Egualada challenged the new group of young artists to create works using a realistic color scheme under a number of themes, including Flowers in Watercolor.

He also introduced concepts such as the separation of positive and negative space in the visual arts, as well as how to break down and compose organic and geometric shapes into colors and figures.

Egualada also took participants on a live painting activity titled “Plein Air” in the Katungan Itibajai Mangrove Glade at the Bungan-Bungan Cold Spring in Aklan.

Works from the second batch of Arts in Youth participants from Crimson Boracay are currently on display at the complex.

HAPI PRIDE MONTH EVENTS

Humanist Alliance Philippines International (HAPI) is organizing a series of activities celebrating Pride Month in June.

These include an art exhibition and an eight-day series of national conferences with an international line-up of artists and speakers respectively.

HAPI’s Pride art exhibition will feature 23 artists from across the Philippines and one based in the United States. The 12-day exhibition will launch at the Dakong Balay Art Gallery in Dumaguete on June 19 after the second day of the Negros-wide Pride March, and will culminate on June 30 with an Art Talk from some of the artists.

On the other hand, the eight-day series of national talks will feature various advocates and experts from across the Philippines, and one from Italy. It will be done via Zoom at 6 p.m. from June 20-27, and is open to all interested participants nationwide and beyond.

More details are available on the HAPI Facebook page.

JULIEN TAN “BEYOND BELIEFS” EXHIBITION

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Handout

Julien Tan is organizing an exhibition called “Beyond Beliefs” until June 15 on the 4th level of the east wing of Shangri-La Plaza.

After being part of the advertising world for over 30 years, Tan returns to the art circuit with works inspired by lasting childhood memories in Roxas City, Capiz.

He explores them in various ways – through painting, drawing and cryptic text.

PRESENTATION OF ROBINSONS GALLERIA SOUTH BONSAI

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Handout

Robinsons Galleria South in San Pedro, Laguna will house over 200 bonsai and suiseki stones during the 2022 BSAPI (Bonsai and Suiseki Alliance of the Philippines Inc.) National Exhibition and Competition.

Bonsai is the art of growing miniature plants, while suiseki is best known as the art of appreciating stone. Specimens from various provinces of the country will be exhibited from June 10 to 16.

Six industry experts will determine the top entries and award winners on June 11 at 10:30 a.m. Horticulturalists and enthusiasts can take part in a series of workshops, talks and demonstrations June 11-15, 1-4 p.m. h.

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Jack Wilke Bonsai Legacy Fund https://rgbonsai.com/jack-wilke-bonsai-legacy-fund/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 07:04:57 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/jack-wilke-bonsai-legacy-fund/ It’s spring, and that means a time of growth for many gardens. The Lenawee Community Foundation is helping one man’s growth vision come true with a new fund. The Jack Wikle Bonsai Legacy Fund was established in 2021 with the Lenawee Community Foundation. Jack and several of his colleagues engaged in the art of bonsai […]]]>

It’s spring, and that means a time of growth for many gardens.

The Lenawee Community Foundation is helping one man’s growth vision come true with a new fund.

The Jack Wikle Bonsai Legacy Fund was established in 2021 with the Lenawee Community Foundation. Jack and several of his colleagues engaged in the art of bonsai established the fund with a mission to provide support for the care and display of the bonsai collection at the University of Hidden Lake Gardens. Michigan State at Tipton.

For over 50 years, Jack has been the creator and curator of the Bonsai collection at Hidden Lake Gardens. A highlight of this summer at Hidden Lake Gardens is the Jack Wikle Bonsai Legacy Auction and Birthday Party on July 9 – Jack’s 90th birthday. Rather than receiving gifts for his birthday, Jack gives as he always has with his time, advice, teaching and practical help to those seeking bonsai. He remained disinterested in these pursuits.

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An engineer quits his high-paying job to make agarwood bonsai trees https://rgbonsai.com/an-engineer-quits-his-high-paying-job-to-make-agarwood-bonsai-trees/ Tue, 31 May 2022 12:28:21 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/an-engineer-quits-his-high-paying-job-to-make-agarwood-bonsai-trees/ Born in 1985 in the central province of Nghe An, Le Hong Thai majored in construction at Da Nang University of Science and Technology and worked as a construction engineer in a company in Da Nang after graduation. His salary then was nearly 30 million VND (over $1,000) – but he was determined to quit […]]]>

Born in 1985 in the central province of Nghe An, Le Hong Thai majored in construction at Da Nang University of Science and Technology and worked as a construction engineer in a company in Da Nang after graduation.

His salary then was nearly 30 million VND (over $1,000) – but he was determined to quit his job to devote himself to carpentry.

Initially, he didn’t know which way to go but after doing preparatory work and realizing business opportunities with bonsai, he chose agarwood as his sole material.

He said it was a difficult process at first because the source of agarwood was very rare, so to find the natural roots of agarwood, he had to go to the highlands of Tien district. Phuoc (Quang Nam province). When Thai found the source of the materials, he started production.

He considered creating miniatures of real trees, but then turned to handmade additions. Finally, he chose copper and aluminum wires to mold old trees attached to agarwood roots.

The creation of a work requires many steps. The first step is to capture the shape and the maker needs to add certain things to a wooden bar to finalize a beautiful product. It’s also the hardest step in creating the work, he says.

After styling the form, the artist will begin to refine the agarwood for sharpness and create the base of the product. The base is made of wood, hard plastic or stone. The base should be sturdy and made of durable wood or high quality plastic materials to maintain quality. Once the agarwood is attached to the base, the next step is decorating and shaping.

At this point, he uses small copper and aluminum wires to bend, align and shape each leaf, branch and root to cling to the base of the tree.

“It’s a time-consuming process that requires the artist’s ingenuity,” Thai said.

The final single bonsai tree ranges from 3 to 15 million VND, with some worth up to hundreds of millions of VND depending on the size and type of agarwood used.

Thai has made about 100 bonsai trees, of which about 10 are sold each month for more than 100 million VND (nearly 5,000 USD).

“Excluding the cost of raw materials, labor, etc., I make about 20% profit,” he shared.

Tam Ky City (Quang Nam Province) People’s Committee Vice Chairman Nguyen Hong Lai recognized Thai as a famous young entrepreneur.

Cong Sang

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A local greenhouse teaches the ancient art of bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/a-local-greenhouse-teaches-the-ancient-art-of-bonsai/ Fri, 27 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/a-local-greenhouse-teaches-the-ancient-art-of-bonsai/ TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) – Working with bonsai trees is an ancient art form. The goal is to create tiny container-grown trees that resemble their much larger counterparts in the wild. If you need a break from the hustle and bustle of our fast-paced world, the Flower Market is a great place to take a deep […]]]>

TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) – Working with bonsai trees is an ancient art form. The goal is to create tiny container-grown trees that resemble their much larger counterparts in the wild.

If you need a break from the hustle and bustle of our fast-paced world, the Flower Market is a great place to take a deep breath and enjoy the natural world. It is full of beautiful things, from koi fish to all kinds of plants and flowers.

Melissa Renaud is one of the new owners of the Marché aux Fleurs.

“It’s a beautiful place and working with the plants is beautiful work,” said Renaud. “I like.”

She and two of her friends bought it earlier this year. One of the biggest parts of this business has always been small bonsai trees.

“How many do you have? A lot, and more and more are growing every day.

And you don’t have to admire them. If you want to learn how to work with trees, there are classes here for all ages and skill levels. “We have a lot of introductory lessons indoors, we have introductory lessons outdoors. You can learn where you can plant your own forest, we have pine and juniper courses, our expert teaches many which are really informative.

Ghazi Zouaoui is an expert whose love of trees began when he received one as a gift.

“It’s an art form to shape your tree, choose your container, present your tree, prune it and wire it,” Zouaoui said.

Zouaoui says working with trees is transformative.

“It’s therapeutic, you can come home after working all day and tinker with your trees and it calms you down, it’s a connection to nature,” Zauaoui said.

And speaking of nature, Renaud says that many small trees live outside.

“Outdoor trees, unless they are being treated, stay outdoors all year round. We provide them with coverage and protection during the winter months,” said Renaud.

There are all shapes of sizes and a wide range of prices in indoor and outdoor varieties. Zouaoui says many of the trees are hundreds of years old.

“The most beautiful sought-after trees with character are very old, they can be 200, 300 or 500 years old. But you can also have beautiful trees that look old but are actually only a few years old,” Zouaoui said.

He adds that caring for them often involves generations.

“Families can bond around trees, go to shows together, take care of their trees together. When you are too old to work on your trees, you can pass it on to your children.

Ghazi says the work being done right now will be appreciated long after you leave this land, trees often outlive their caregivers.

“It’s a bit humiliating because working on a tree like this and if it’s well cared for will outlive me. I will be gone one day and this tree will be there long after.

Classes are offered year-round at the Flower Market. If you want to know more, click here.

See a spelling or grammatical error in our story? Please include the title when you Click here to report it.

Copyright 2022 WTVG. All rights reserved.

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Get ready to relax at the Spice Route Bonsai Plant Fair! https://rgbonsai.com/get-ready-to-relax-at-the-spice-route-bonsai-plant-fair/ Fri, 27 May 2022 06:00:29 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/get-ready-to-relax-at-the-spice-route-bonsai-plant-fair/ The plant revolution is real. So many people realize how important nature is, especially after two years indoors. And sometimes it’s a good idea to bring the outdoors inside. Many are beginning to embrace the concept of ‘plant parents’, purchasing an array of lush greenery to beautify […]]]>







The plant revolution is real. So many people realize how important nature is, especially after two years indoors.

And sometimes it’s a good idea to bring the outdoors inside. Many are beginning to embrace the concept of ‘plant parents’, purchasing an array of lush greenery to beautify their homes. Bonsai trees have particularly become popular through their association with the art of Feng Shuai and their ability to draw vital energies into a room. It is a welcome addition to any home.

You do not have any ? Carefree!

Whether you are looking for some plant babies to add to your family or looking for a fun way to spend your Saturday, the spice route is the perfect place for both. On June 4, this popular destination will host the Bonsai Fair.

Enjoy a day filled with amazing food, delicious drinks and wandering the stalls selling a selection of fascinating bonsai trees!

Allow the kids to burn off some excess energy with the large tray available, or spend your day sampling a range of wines, beers, gin and chocolates – delicious!

Be sure to save the date and don’t miss this really cool event. Visit their Facebook page for more information.

Read also :

Cape Town ranks 2nd in ‘Top 10 Most Scenic African Cities for Running’

Image: Unsplash






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Michigan ‘bonsai artist’ retires after more than 50 years carving trees https://rgbonsai.com/michigan-bonsai-artist-retires-after-more-than-50-years-carving-trees/ Sun, 22 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/michigan-bonsai-artist-retires-after-more-than-50-years-carving-trees/ TIPTON, MI – Almost 70 years ago, bonsai came into Jack Wikle’s life. Originally from a small farm in Hillsdale County, he earned a degree in biology from Michigan State University at the height of the Korean War. With a degree in hand, the Army sent Wikle to Japan for duty. His early interactions with […]]]>

TIPTON, MI – Almost 70 years ago, bonsai came into Jack Wikle’s life.

Originally from a small farm in Hillsdale County, he earned a degree in biology from Michigan State University at the height of the Korean War. With a degree in hand, the Army sent Wikle to Japan for duty.

His early interactions with traditional Japanese trees piqued his interest, particularly the way bonsai enthusiasts manicured and cut the leaves as if they were “living sculptures,” Wikle said. This interest turned into a passion for bonsai as an art form.

Wikle, who approaches his 90th birthday in July, has shared that passion with the people of southeast Michigan for more than five decades as curator of the Bonsai collection at Hidden Lake Gardens in Tipton.

The garden, owned and operated by his alma mater MSU, hired Wikle 54 years ago as its first education specialist. His retirement party on July 9 will also serve as an auction event for the garden to raise funds to safeguard the future of his bonsai vision.

“The first bonsai exhibit at Hidden Lake started in 1968 with some of my personal trees,” he said. “What exists today has all evolved from that.”

The in-person and virtual auction will take place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the garden location at 6214 Monroe Road off M-50. All proceeds will go to a legacy fund to maintain its collection, said Paul Pfeifer, general manager of Hidden Lake Gardens.

“It’s really going to help us develop a fund that will then be available to keep fundraising solvent,” he said, “whether we need to help pay another curator’s salaries, hire a intern student, to purchase new trees, to conduct any type of maintenance or to expand the collection in any way.

More details about the auction or Hidden Lake Gardens support can be found at jackwiklebonsailegacy.com.

Read more: It Took Evergreens and People to Help This Michigan Peony Garden Survive 100 Years

For Wikle, he first felt he couldn’t work on bonsai because he was not Japanese. Later he found a bonsai garden in Grand Ledge curated by a man named Bob Maxon and realized that could be an activity for him as well.

“What he was doing was exciting for me and it made a positive impression on me,” Wikle said. “I decided that if I had a chance, I would like to try to do it.”

The process of creating art through bonsai is a meditative process, Wikle said, adding that the discipline needed to create a work of art honors Japanese culture.

“What we aspire to do is an artistic statement about nature and trees and the beauty of it all and to go further and become more and more aware of the beauty of the close interaction between people and nature”, did he declare.

Her passion is contagious, said garden volunteer Lisa Hart.

“Many descriptors come to mind about Jack: bonsai artist, teacher, nature lover, philosopher are just a few,” she said. “Spending a few minutes with Jack at the Bonsai Collection is about appreciating his passion for bonsai, enjoying his humor and sharing a cultural experience you didn’t really expect.”

His collection at Hidden Lakes Garden now consists of trees ranging in age from 20 to over 100 years old. Some of them are native to Japan, while some native Michigan trees, such as beech and tamarack, are tended in the traditional bonsai style.

Wikle makes the exhibit accessible to visitors to the garden with her “outgoing and caring attitude,” Pfeifer said.

“He’ll talk to anyone,” Pfeifer said. “He will demonstrate bonsai to anyone and he will listen to anyone. If you’re into plants or nature, he’s all ears and loves spending time with people.

With retirement only a few weeks away, Wikle’s love for bonsai will continue. He still plans to volunteer at Hidden Lake Gardens and is the longest serving member of the Ann Arbor Bonsai Society.

With the fundraising auction, he just hopes that Hidden Lakes can find someone who will work hard to keep the bonsai collection alive.

“We’re trying to make sure it continues at a quality level long after I’m gone,” he said.

Learn more about The Jackson Citizen Patriot:

A University of Michigan scientist helped find a black hole in the Milky Way

Michigan alumni view Ann Arbor Hilton, Marriott acquisition as a homecoming

This Michigan Surgeon Has Climbed the Tallest Mountain on Every Continent

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How to care for bonsai – the 6 expert tips you need https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-the-6-expert-tips-you-need/ Sat, 21 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-the-6-expert-tips-you-need/ Of all the current houseplant trends, bonsai care is the one that surprised us. Of course, technically they’re not plants, they’re trees – and once you understand their rich history, the bonsai boom makes perfect sense. However you cut it, horticulture is in! “Although often considered a Japanese tradition, the art of bonsai originated in […]]]>

Of all the current houseplant trends, bonsai care is the one that surprised us. Of course, technically they’re not plants, they’re trees – and once you understand their rich history, the bonsai boom makes perfect sense. However you cut it, horticulture is in!

“Although often considered a Japanese tradition, the art of bonsai originated in China around 700 AD,” explains plant expert Jo Lambell, founder of Beards and Daisies.

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