Bonsai soil – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 18:14:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Bonsai soil – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Root Awakening: Linden Plants Need Sunshine and Well-Drained Soil to Thrive, Home & Design News & Top Stories https://rgbonsai.com/root-awakening-linden-plants-need-sunshine-and-well-drained-soil-to-thrive-home-design-news-top-stories/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/root-awakening-linden-plants-need-sunshine-and-well-drained-soil-to-thrive-home-design-news-top-stories/ Linden plants need sun and well-drained soil to thrive I usually get lime seedlings after the Chinese New Year holiday season. However, making them continue to bloom and bear fruit is a chore. What are plants missing? Do I have to prune them after each fruiting? Also, what is the name of the big lime […]]]>

Linden plants need sun and well-drained soil to thrive

I usually get lime seedlings after the Chinese New Year holiday season. However, making them continue to bloom and bear fruit is a chore. What are plants missing? Do I have to prune them after each fruiting? Also, what is the name of the big lime factory? The leaves and fruits also continue to fall.

Lynne teo

Linden plants appear to be in poor health. Note that these plants grow best in direct sunlight for at least six hours a day. If the plants grow in a shady area, they tend to lose vigor and gradually decline.

The soil should be well drained because citrus fruits, in general, do not like wet feet. Check if the growing medium is still suitable for the plants. Over time, depending on the composition, some growing media break down and settle. This leads to a growth mixture which has compacted and may contain too much water.

You can take the plants out and carefully remove the outer layer of the spent growing medium, then repot them with a well-drained mixture containing more grainy material.

Fruit drop may be due to plant stress caused by too much or too little water as well as fruit fly infestation. It is usually not necessary to prune the plant after fruiting.

As for the identity of the large lime tree, it could be a cultivar of lime tree (Citrus × microcarpa). Identifying exactly can be tricky as there are so many cultivars out there and many look alike.


Soursop lacks nutrients

PHOTO: LIM JOO JOON

My soursop tree is about three and a half years old. About six months ago the leaves turned yellowish green and the new branches stopped growing. But it has many flowers, although none have developed into fruit. I used to prune the plant regularly to use the leaves for making tea and new branches would sprout after a few weeks.

Lim Joo Joon

Soursop exhibits widespread yellowing, indicating that it may lack nitrogen. Have you fertilized the tree?

It is not clear from the photo how your plant is grown.

Check that it is not grown in compacted soil and poorly drained soil. Compacted soils can be corrected over time with mulch and top soil forks, but be careful not to damage the roots.

Waterlogged conditions can be difficult to correct if the plant is growing in low soil. In addition, soursop does not transplant well. In this case, you might want to start some new plants and grow them in a more suitable location.

If the plant is grown in a pot, its roots may have filled the container and the nutrients have been depleted. It can also easily experience water stress due to a small volume of soil. Consider moving the plant to a larger container or growing it in the ground.


Fukien’s tea tree is a popular candidate for bonsai

This plant grew in my flowerpot. I had pruned the branches that had grown, but it continues to grow. What type of plant is it and is it safe to keep?

Sarojani Rethnavelu


PHOTO: SAROJANI RETHNAVELU

The plant is commonly known as the Fukien tea tree. Its botanical name is Ehretia microphylla. Locally, this plant is widely used as a bonsai candidate where it is trained to become a miniature tree in artistic form.

You can find it spontaneously in your flower beds or flower pots, as its seeds are susceptible to being dispersed by birds that consume its small red fruits.

It grows best in direct sunlight, but can also tolerate filtered sunlight. Its leaves are said to be used in making tea and also have medicinal uses. Its red fruits are said to be edible.


Ming Aralia can be propagated by cuttings


PHOTO: MERANDA CHIA

I received this plant about 1 1/2 years ago. It was then between 7cm and 10cm, but has now reached around 1m and looks like a Christmas tree. Can I cut the stalk to regrow it?

Meranda chia

The plant is one of the many cultivars of Polyscias fruticosa, commonly known as Ming Aralia. As the holiday season approaches, why not give it some support by propping it up with a bamboo pole and adorning it with lights and decorations?

If this plant has grown too tall, you can cut it down. The resulting cut stem can be portioned into lengths of 10 cm. These can be planted in smaller pots to take root and they will grow into new plants.

Aralia Ming can grow in both direct and filtered sunlight. It is also a resistant plant to grow in the vegetable garden.


Bitter gourd plant infected with disease


PHOTO: RITA TONG

I notice tiny yellow spots on the leaves of my bitter plant. Are these pests or do they indicate that the plant is lacking in nutrients? If so, what nutrients should I give it?

Rita Tong

The yellow spots could be a fungal disease caused by shady or rainy conditions.

Make sure your plant is grown in direct sunlight – lack of light can weaken the plants and become prone to disease. A dense, shaded canopy will allow pathogenic organisms to thrive and infect a weaker plant. Also give your plant enough air circulation to keep the leaves dry.

Rainy conditions can cause disease due to rain damage as well as predominant wet conditions with lack of sunlight. As such, it’s best to plan your crop growth during the drier part of the year to reduce the incidence of disease.

You can prune the leaves with yellow spots. It is not necessary to feed the nutrients to the plant.


Answers from Dr. Wilson Wong, NParks Certified Practicing Horticulturist, Park Manager and ISA Certified Arborist. He is the founder of Green Culture Singapore and Assistant Assistant Professor (Food Science and Technology) at the National University of Singapore.

  • A question about gardening? Email it with clear, high-resolution images of at least 1MB, if applicable, and your full name to stlife@sph.com.sg. We reserve the right to modify and reject the questions.
]]>
Caring for jade plants: water, light, soil https://rgbonsai.com/caring-for-jade-plants-water-light-soil/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/caring-for-jade-plants-water-light-soil/ Jade plants are a beginner’s favorite plant for bonsai enthusiasts and are considered lucky in feng shui. Jade plants are succulents, which makes them hardy and fairly easy to care for. Like their natural habitat, jade plants prefer bright direct light and warm temperatures. Visit Insider’s Home and Kitchen Reference Library for more stories. The […]]]>
  • Jade plants are a beginner’s favorite plant for bonsai enthusiasts and are considered lucky in feng shui.
  • Jade plants are succulents, which makes them hardy and fairly easy to care for.
  • Like their natural habitat, jade plants prefer bright direct light and warm temperatures.
  • Visit Insider’s Home and Kitchen Reference Library for more stories.

The loyal and hardy jade plant is one of the most popular succulent houseplants. Native to South Africa and Mozambique, this durable plant requires an infrequent watering schedule, and although they prefer direct light, they can tolerate low light conditions. Also known as the lucky plant, jade plants represent friendship and prosperity in Asian countries.

Erin Marino, Editorial Manager and Plant Expert at The Sill, shares her top care tips on the beloved jade plant so you can keep it as a lucky charm.

Identify a jade plant

A close up of a jade plant against a black background

The color of the leaves of a jade plant will change depending on the amount of sunlight it receives.

LazingBee / Getty Images


With thick stems and plump, shiny, oval-shaped leaves, the charming jade plant has the appearance of a mini tree. There are dozens of varieties of jade plants, but most are easily identified by their dark green leaves which can sometimes have a reddish tinge.

“The word crassus in Latin means ‘thick.’ The name Crassula has been given to this group of succulents because they have thick leaves and stems that store water,” says Marino.

Jade plants also have bonsai abilities, which means they can take on a mini tree appearance and are the preferred beginner plant for bonsai enthusiasts. “A lot of bonsai beginners start with a jade plant because they are so hardy and can easily take on a bonsai shape when pruned correctly,” says Marino.

The water

A hand using a yellow watering can to water a small jade plant

Water only when the soil is dry.

Melena-Nsk / Getty Images


As with all succulents, overwatering can be fatal and the jade plant is no exception. Marino recommends watering your jade plant only when the soil is completely dry. To check this, stick your finger into the soil – if the soil sticks to your finger, don’t water; if there is no earth, it is time for a drink.

“If you’re worried about overwatering, wait until the leaves of your jade plant crumple before watering again,” says Marino. “It is a sign of thirst in fleshy and succulent plants.”

Ground

Traditional potting mix will not work with jade plants or other succulents. These plants need rocky or grainy soil that will allow good drainage and prevent root rot. Choosing a terracotta pot for your jade plant will also retain some moisture so you can maintain the infrequent watering schedule that he prefers.

“Go for a sandy, well-drained soil for potting your plant, like a succulent mix,” says Marino.

Light and temperature

A jade plant with bright red leaf tips growing outdoors in a terracotta pot

Jade plants grown in full sun will have leaves with vibrant red tips.

Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images


Because jade plants come from a hot, dry environment, it is best to replicate these conditions indoors as closely as possible for your jade plant to thrive. If your plant gets enough sun, its leaves can reward you with beautiful red edges.

“Keep the temperatures around 75 degrees Fahrenheit and place them in a location where they receive bright direct light,” says Marino. “If your space doesn’t get much natural light, place your jade plant under a grow light instead.”

If you live in a cooler area, Marino recommends bringing your jade plant indoors before temperatures drop below 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

Spread

There are two ways to propagate a jade plant: leaf cutting and stem cutting. To propagate by leaf cuttings, be sure to pick the healthiest leaf from a mature branch and gently remove it.

Make sure to remove the stem of the leaf with it, this is where the new roots and young leaves will grow, ”says Marino. “Leave the leaf in a dry place until the bottom is crusted over, then place it on the new repotting. ground and lightly mist it every week. ”

A new baby jade will eventually grow from where the leaf was removed from the mother plant. Marino also suggests speeding up the propagation process by dipping this end in rooting hormone powder once covered with scabs and before placing it on the ground.

To propagate by stem cutting, Marino says to use pruning shears to take a healthy stem cutting – a piece of the plant’s stem or branch – a few inches long and let it sit in a dry place until what the bottom crusts are covering, then repeat the same steps as the leaf cutting process.

Common problems

Like most houseplants, the jade plant can suffer from excess water and is also susceptible to common pests such as mealybugs and spider mites. To overcome this, Marino recommends a simple solution using household items.

“Treat visible bugs with a cotton swab or cotton swab dipped in alcohol,” says Marino. “Make sure you have every nook and cranny where these pests like to hide, and check your plant weekly for signs of reinfestation.”

Insider’s takeaway

With enough direct light, warmth, the right potting mix, and an infrequent watering schedule, your jade plant can grow and thrive with the same strength and beauty as the trees it looks like.

]]>
Find out when and where to use which soil in the garden https://rgbonsai.com/find-out-when-and-where-to-use-which-soil-in-the-garden/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/find-out-when-and-where-to-use-which-soil-in-the-garden/ When it comes to gardening and growing, “having your feet on the ground” isn’t just a compliment – it’s a necessity. We all know that healthy gardens start with healthy soil, but different plants have different requirements too. Do you know which bag of soil to choose from the wide range available in your garden […]]]>

When it comes to gardening and growing, “having your feet on the ground” isn’t just a compliment – it’s a necessity. We all know that healthy gardens start with healthy soil, but different plants have different requirements too.

Do you know which bag of soil to choose from the wide range available in your garden center? Don’t worry, we’ve got some simple tips to help you get the most from your soil the next time you’re investing time and money in your garden.

If you are planting a seed, use a professional germination mix.

This lightly mixed potting mix is ​​carefully formulated for optimal seed germination. Fill your trays with this delicate mixture, sow your seeds and watch them grow.

If you are planting seedlings, use seedling mixture.

Transplant the seedlings from the germination mix directly into the seedling mix for hollow trays, planters or planters. This will ensure that you grow healthy, resilient transplants with strong root systems.

If you are planting lawn, use compost.

Dig compost in your existing garden to enrich the soil before laying an instant lawn or sowing your choice of grass seeds.

If you are feeding an existing lawn, use lawn covering.

This is usually done in the spring. Scarify your lawn and apply a coat of organic lawn spray to transform your dull grass into a lush meadow of greenery.

If you are adjusting the dirt levels, use topsoil.

Good quality topsoil is best for filling in holes in your lawn or adding height to flower beds. It can also be used in large raised beds, mixed with compost, to create better growing conditions.

.

If you are planting in a container, use a professional Potting mix.

It is the “right” soil in the gardening world. It is suitable for most plants so fill your pots and plant straight away. The potting mix added fertilizer and the right amount of raw material to maintain the ideal balance of water retention / drainage and retain enough water to keep your plants healthy.

If you are planting new plants in the garden, use compost or mix of landscapers.

Use either compost mixed with existing garden soil or a landscaping mix – a ready-made topsoil / compost mixture. Both contain organic matter and add beneficial microbes, micronutrients, and macronutrients to your soil.

If you are planting acid-loving plants like fynbos, azaleas, camellias, and hydrangeas, use acidic compost.

Before planting acid-loving plants, be sure to mix some acidic compost into your garden soil. Also use this combination for potted plants that like acid. For seasonal feeding, simply mix some acidic compost into the top layer of soil around the plants and water well.

If you are planting vegetables, use compost.

Vegetables need large amounts of nutrient-rich soil to produce healthy foods. Mix a generous amount of compost in your vegetable garden each year. Consider adding some kraal manure and vermicompost to produce an award-winning crop.

If you are repotting your beloved orchid, use mix of orchids.

This is usually done every one to two years after flowering. Remove the plant, discard the old mixture and cut off the dead roots. Then, replant directly into an orchid mix, which contains organic fertilizer to nourish the annual bloom, as well as charcoal to maintain a moist but healthy root environment.

If you are planting succulents, use succulent mix.

Succulents need a well-drained medium to thrive. Plant your aloes, crassulas and other succulents directly in this mixture for best results. Remember to provide plenty of sun and not to overwater.

If you are planting herbs, use mixture of herbs.

Whether you are planting herbs in pots, containers or boxes, this is your first choice. Plant the seedlings directly into filled containers. The additional fertilizer in the herb mix will allow your herbs to thrive for at least three months before you need to supplement with liquid fertilizer.

If you are planting bonsai trees, use bonsai mix.

Due to the lack of space and nutrients, bonsai trees need to be repotted fairly regularly. Do this before the growing season and use a bonsai mix to replenish your tree with essential nutrients, while ensuring sufficient drainage. After three months, start liquid fertilizing or top up with a slow release fertilizer.

DID YOU KNOW?

Click on the words highlighted in red to learn more about this and related topics.

To receive news links via WhatsApp or Telegram, send an invitation to 061 876 3179.

The Sun of the southern lands is also on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram – why not join us there?

Do you have more information regarding this story?

Do not hesitate to let us know by commenting on our Facebook page or you can contact our editorial staff on 031 903 2341 and speak to a journalist.

(Comments posted on this issue may be used for publication in the Sun).

]]>
Fallow land: benefits of fallow land https://rgbonsai.com/fallow-land-benefits-of-fallow-land/ Fri, 30 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/fallow-land-benefits-of-fallow-land/ Fallow Fallow is land that has not been cultivated for a long time. It is basically a land that is left to rest and regenerate itself. In different parts of India, North Africa, Mediterranean regions and many other places, land fallowing has been a method of sustainable land management practiced by farmers for centuries. Many […]]]>
Fallow

Fallow is land that has not been cultivated for a long time. It is basically a land that is left to rest and regenerate itself.

In different parts of India, North Africa, Mediterranean regions and many other places, land fallowing has been a method of sustainable land management practiced by farmers for centuries. Many agricultural producers in the southwestern United States and Canada have also started to fallow land.

Earlier in the history of fallow, farmers adopted the rotation of draft fields. In the two-field rotation, they divide the field into two halves, one half is used for planting the crops and the other half is left fallow. But now the farmers have started planting the crops on fallow land while letting the other half rest or fallow.

As agriculture developed, the size of cultivated fields increased and brand new equipment, tools and chemicals were made available to farmers.

So many agricultural producers have abandoned the system of fallowing the land. This can be a controversial topic in a few circles because a field that is not planted will not yield any profit.

Nonetheless, new studies are highlighting the benefits of fallowing gardens and fields.

Does fallow benefit

Yes, it benefits gardens and cultivated fields. Allowing the soil to have a special rest period gives time to restore nutrients that can be extracted from certain plants or from regular irrigation. This saves money on fertilizers and irrigation.

From deep within the soil, fallow soil induces potassium and phosphorus to the soil surface so that it can be used later. It has many other benefits like it increases the level of nitrogen, carbon and organic matter, improves moisture holding capacity, and grows profitable microorganisms in the soil.

Studies have shown that a field that has not been cultivated for a year will produce a higher crop yield during his plantation. Furthermore, IThis can be done in a large cash crop field and in small home gardens as well.

If space and time are not available, it is not necessary to keep the area unplanted for 1 to 5 years. Rather in one area, they can alternate spring and fall crops.

]]>
FACE TO FACE: “The Soil Guru” on mission and people are adhering to his message https://rgbonsai.com/face-to-face-the-soil-guru-on-mission-and-people-are-adhering-to-his-message/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/face-to-face-the-soil-guru-on-mission-and-people-are-adhering-to-his-message/ By FÉLICITÉ DARVILLE The cannabis industry is starting to take shape in the Bahamas with the impending Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2021 set to be tabled in Parliament. As the issues are settled and cries are raised for fairness to the common man and groups like the Rastafari movement, some are taking the bull by the […]]]>

By FÉLICITÉ DARVILLE

The cannabis industry is starting to take shape in the Bahamas with the impending Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2021 set to be tabled in Parliament.

As the issues are settled and cries are raised for fairness to the common man and groups like the Rastafari movement, some are taking the bull by the horns and preparing to claim their right in the industry. One of these visionaries is Valin Bodie.

Photo

Valin is said to be the youngest soil scientist in the cannabis industry in the United States – and the only black. The 26-year-old Bahamian owns and operates Environmental Soil Solutions (ESS), a flooring company with a 6,000 square foot warehouse in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and a second warehouse under construction in Oklahoma City. There he works from his research and development tent, monitoring all progress and preparing and mixing the soil.

Valin sources pure organic resources to create its soil mixes. He uses his extensive knowledge of these organic components, gained through his hands-on experience in leading growth companies, to create transformative products. His soil was so successful in growing cannabis and other plants that it was dubbed ‘the soil guru’, and the name stuck as it created a movement towards environmental sustainability around the brand.

There was a buzz surrounding the Soil Guru booth at last week’s CannaCon – one of the biggest cannabis conferences in the hemisphere. It was held at the Oklahoma City Convention Center and is considered a must-see for anyone working in the cannabis business or considering entering it.

CannaCon was an interactive gathering of industry professionals, entrepreneurs and experts discussing the latest industry developments. There, Valin was interviewed by local media who saw that there was something special about this passionate entrepreneur operating from his core value, which is to leave Earth better than when he was there.

He takes this value, in conjunction with his scientific knowledge and desire for sustainability to create a sustainable flooring company that is making strides in the industry.

As a soil scientist, Valin carefully studied the Bahamian soil he grew up on, taking into account that it is limestone and very unique, and created a special blend. This blend will allow cannabis planted in the Bahamas to be successful, which is critical to the sustainability of the brewing industry in the country.

“I can help the Bahamas become a more sustainable nation by contributing to the quality of the soils and only the overall quality of the land,” said Valin.

“It encompasses many facets such as prohibiting land degradation and increasing land conservation through the mirror of sustainability and soil management. “

As he introduced his business to hundreds of partners and potential clients just days ago, he was supported by his mother, Mia Campbell, and publicist, Lia Head-Rigby. He is the CEO of ESS and his wife, Keisha, is the CEO. With their daughter Iva Rayne, they prove that families can come together and work together in the agricultural industry and strive for self-sufficiency.

Photo

“Food security is something people realize now that you are what you eat,” he said.

“So if you can save your body in the long run and your pockets in the short term, I think it’s an overall sustainable lifestyle.”

After her event in Oklahoma ends, Valin now plans to tour California and Florida to promote her special soil mixes.

According to CannaCon, Oklahoma has become the “far west of legalized cannabis markets,” overtaking the rest of the United States in terms of medical license holders and licensed cannabis businesses. In 2020, the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Association reported that its patient count represented nearly 10% of the state’s total population.

“CannaCon has been a huge success in conveying the knowledge I have gained to the industry through the contacts made – whether exhibitors or attendees,” said Valin.

“I have made many contacts with big companies like Grow Generation and celebrities like Jim Belushi! I look forward to the exponential growth that my business will experience in the months to come.

For Mia and Lia, Valin’s success is exciting as they have seen him grow from a little boy playing the streets of Johnson Road, to becoming a football star in his country, to becoming a pioneer in the cannabis industry before. his birth in the Bahamas.

“You don’t have to bring all these foreigners into the industry in the Bahamas when you have Bahamians who are already valuable to the cannabis industry,” Lia pointed out, noting that she knows personally of. other Bahamians making strides in cannabis across the United States.

Photo

When Valin attended St Augustine’s College at Fox Hill, he knew he wanted to pursue an education that would enable him to make a valuable contribution to planet Earth. He believes soil is one of the most important things on Earth, after water and oxygen. After graduating, he attended Essex County College in Newark, New Jersey. He then transferred to Oral Roberts University where he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree with a concentration in Global Environmental Sustainability. There he met his college sweetheart who became his wife, and together he and Keisha set out on their mission to make an impact on the cannabis industry.

They think and research together, and they put the recipes down on paper. Next, Valin starts mixing the recipe by hand, then sends it to the labs for testing. It then tinkers with the soil as needed to achieve the required level of nutrients desired. He is currently excited about a new trend – the cultivation of bonsai cannabis.

“I am one hundred percent behind the legalization of cannabis because I have used cannabis as a way to overcome one of the worst concussions you can have,” he explained.

“I think there needs to be more education on cannabis to alleviate the societal stigma of it as a plant. The government must ensure that it addresses the loopholes in the laws it is about to pass and that this is done in a way that is sustainable for the country in the long term. I think it’s great to create much-needed income for the country and to have an export that we can benefit from. “

Valin calls himself “a handyman of the earth, a visionary of resources, a curious soul and a man of intention”. He shares his keys to success with young people when he is invited to speak in his alma mater and in other institutions.

As he climbs to greater success, he is always aware of the trials he will face: “God has to increase my capacity for blessings before increasing my blessings, so I am good with the struggle even if it becomes difficult. “

Long before entrepreneurial success, Valin, a fellow from Lyford Cay, used to win. He’s an athlete whose soccer success earned him publicity along the way. He played for the Bahamian national soccer team and the Cavalier Football Club. He played under Hugo Pierre at Essex County College where he led the team to the Region 19 playoffs, and went on to play for Oral Roberts University. He also played for the Bahamas National Beach Soccer Team in 2017.

His national pride extends to his flooring business and he aims to make a valuable contribution to the industry here. Customer service and product knowledge helped him grow his business.

“They work hand in hand,” he explained.

“If you know your product, believe it and stand up for it, you will help producers understand it better, which in turn will allow you to sell your product. Knowledge transfer fuels the funnel.

Valin’s report on Face to Face comes weeks after we captured the story of Dr. Robert Taylor, a veteran soil scientist in the United States and a Bahamian son of the soil. Dr Taylor pointed out that the limestone-filled soil of the Bahamas could become very viable with the right organic components.

Valin is proving it now and is expected to make a major announcement in the coming weeks.

Contact Valin by e-mail at: lia@mediamavensgroup.com

]]>
America’s youngest bonsai master flourishes in native soil https://rgbonsai.com/americas-youngest-bonsai-master-flourishes-in-native-soil/ Thu, 01 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/americas-youngest-bonsai-master-flourishes-in-native-soil/ Bjorn Bjorholm, 34, zooms in from his home near Nashville, Tenn. It’s February, a deep winter, and her skin looks pale surrounded by bare white walls. Outside, an unusual cold snap has closed the town and its Eisei-en bonsai nursery sits under a thick blanket of snow. “Dreary” would be the best word, ”he says […]]]>

Bjorn Bjorholm, 34, zooms in from his home near Nashville, Tenn. It’s February, a deep winter, and her skin looks pale surrounded by bare white walls. Outside, an unusual cold snap has closed the town and its Eisei-en bonsai nursery sits under a thick blanket of snow. “Dreary” would be the best word, ”he says to describe the space. “Which is always the case in winter.”

Bjorholm, from Knoxville, Tenn., Explains the name of his dormant business: “Evergreen garden,” roughly translated from Japanese; the one that is always in bloom. “But it also has some deeper meanings,” he continues. “Forever young”, or having an open mind, ready to learn. “And that can also translate to ‘always green’, like always making money,” he laughs. “My wife made it up.”

Related Guides

Called the “Brad Pitt of bonsai,” the six-foot-six Bjorholm is a house of mirrors when juxtaposed with his chosen contraption. With the muscular construction of a tight end, in good weather he towers over miniature trees which he bends, tears and cuts. He was even more visible during his nine years in Kyoto, Japan after college, most of which was spent in the routine of learning bonsai seven days a week from sunrise to sunset. He was an anomaly, “a novelty,” he says of his apprenticeship under the guidance of elder Keiichi Fujikawa. Despite the master’s initial reluctance to hire an apprentice, let alone a foreigner, Bjorholm came to be treated like a son as well as some sort of local celebrity. Customers in their forties, depositing their trees at the nursery for annual maintenance, would seek his hand rather than that of the owner. “I like to think it was because I was good,” he said, “but I think it was because they wanted to brag to their friends that a Westerner had styled their tree.”

But as infatuated as he was with Japanese culture, which led him to make the decision to emigrate, the great American quickly left his tourist mentality behind and became one with the land itself. (After all, after a decade very few people still feel like a foreigner.) One of his greatest lessons: patience, a virtue he believes most North Americans don’t understand. “Say, for example, that you remove a large branch from a tree,” he says. “You want that wound to heal in four, five, six years, so in 20 years it’s imperceptible on the trunk of the tree. You must therefore know the right technique and apply it now to be able to achieve this result in 20 years. These are all things that I think about much more deeply from my learning in Japan. “

Contrary to the understanding of many in America, bonsai is not a species of tree but a style of cultivation, in which specific trees, selected by the merits of their curvature, the size of their leaves and their adaptability. , are established in small pots and trained to grow. in certain curves and planes. In a field, they can grow to 40 feet or more, but with precise pruning, dressage wires, and shallow dishes, they live their hundreds of years in miniature. Another detail that goes against popular belief: while bonsai training can be gradual, for young trees it is often violent, with pruned branches and sheared taproots. Any action plan, fast or slow, is obtained by a spirit of decision turned towards the future. Cuts are made to focus the blossoming. “It totally changed my perspective on work, on life, on thinking about the future, on culture, on everything,” says Bjorholm.

In Japan, bonsai, like sumo and sushi, is a subculture in itself that far exceeds the surface knowledge of the United States. with pages in glossy magazines and portraits sewn onto handkerchiefs. “There are 50 to 60 trees in Japan that everyone knows. And of those 50 or 60 trees, there are probably four or five that will forever be considered the best bonsai in the history of the world, ”he says. “So, yeah, seeing these in person was crazy.”

Bjorholm looks like an American when he talks about the awe he felt walking through these exhibition halls with his head and shoulders higher than the native population and speechless from his poor Japanese and the effects of ‘be struck by the stars. But his actions were anything but stereotypical American during the long hours of a six-year apprenticeship, which could include repotting hundreds of trees and then walking through town to help Fujikawa-sensei’s parents pull vegetables from them. their garden. Under the guidance of his teacher, he grew up, and after graduating from the program, he remained working in the same nursery while traveling within the country. He and his wife, a Chinese national he met during a study abroad program in his last year, considered staying in Japan, but immigration restrictions meant they would have to still a decade before they can start their own nursery. In the long run, it was a bad future, and so Bjorholm made a decision, returning to the United States in 2017 and relocating to Nashville, where he believed he would find the most fertile ground to develop his own business.

Bonsai has been in the United States for decades, although it is largely a japonophile hobby. Bonsai techniques were passed on from first generation Japanese immigrants to other Americans, who then passed them on to young people like Bjorholm. In this generational transfer, Asian trees had become orthodoxy. “It was the Japanese species,” he recalls. “It has never been so cool working with native stuff until I come back from Japan and realize how good the base material is here.”

While he had experimented with American flora as a high school student – after all, it’s cheaper to dig up a tree in a field than to buy a seedling from a garden center – red cedars and Virginia pines didn’t hold the mystery of a Japanese Maple. But after nearly a decade in Japan, with mystery replaced by practicality, Bjornholm began to soberly appraise New World wood, and what he found was promising.

“When [the Japanese] see our native material here, they are very jealous, ”he says, explaining that in Japan, the overexploitation of wild trees from the 70s adapted to bonsai, or yamadori, led to the scarcity of wild nature, and since then the collection has been prohibited. At the same time, a growing and affluent Chinese market buys heritage trees, a second deforestation. “All that is bonsai in Japan is all they have,” he said, “so there are fewer and fewer good trees in Japan. Here there is an almost endless supply.

Bjorholm has not only become a pioneer and advocate for North American species adapted to bonsai, but he is also a leading educator in the United States. Thanks to his YouTube channel, which he films and edits himself, he has already amassed over 150,000 subscribers, which is no small feat for what many consider a niche hobby. For subscribers, part of the attraction is its natural magnetism; minimalist and refined sets; and clear instructions. But a lot can also be attributed to the influx of bonsai researchers in 2020, during which any socially remote activity that state governments have not restricted, from houseplants to bicycles, has seen unprecedented demand. .

“Right now in the United States, bonsai is booming,” he says. “Plus, the ability to work with native material and do unique and interesting things that have never been done before has all happened before us.”

The late winter season, which he calls “the calm before the storm,” offers a brief respite. Its workshop and cold frame are filled with trees stacked on all surfaces to protect them from single-digit temperatures, which are extreme even for hardy trees, and the outdoor benches they are typically displayed on are buried under six inches of height. ice and snow.

But spring is coming.

With temperatures forecast to reach the 60s in the coming week, Bjorholm can already see into the future. Over the next few days, this snow-covered space will melt on the bare wood shelves, and it will slowly move the trees towards the sun. In March, the bare brown and gray branches will swell with green buds before the reds of the freshly foliated deciduous trees, the chartreuse feathers of the juniper branches and the pale blossoms of the cherry trees will dot the space. Customers will drive, lay down their overwintered trees for annual maintenance, prune new growth, and rewire branches and trunks. And at the end of April, his wife will give birth to their first child, a daughter.

We talk a little more about the North American wild species that he collects to learn about a new culture. The agents he works with in Colorado scour the backcountry looking for the right trees to carefully remove and return to Eisei-en and a new home in the south.

“These plants, in their natural environment, survive. That’s why they all look twisted and gnarled, ”says Bjorholm, owner of the evergreen garden. “Our goal is to make them prosper.

Editor’s recommendations






]]>
How to choose the best soil for your plants https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-choose-the-best-soil-for-your-plants/ Fri, 12 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-choose-the-best-soil-for-your-plants/ Dirt is not just dirt. And you can’t put all of your houseplants in the same type of soil. Many plants do very well in standard potting soil, but some types need a little extra help getting big and strong. A little research goes a long way. Cacti need soil that dries very quickly, orchids […]]]>

Dirt is not just dirt. And you can’t put all of your houseplants in the same type of soil. Many plants do very well in standard potting soil, but some types need a little extra help getting big and strong. A little research goes a long way.

Cacti need soil that dries very quickly, orchids need something that allows their roots to thrive, and even monsteras and snake plants benefit greatly from using soil formulated for deter pests. Here’s what to know about the best soil for plants before buying another bag.

The best soil for different plants

1. Cactus: Sun Gro Horticulture Black Gold Cactus Mix, $ 15

Planting your cactus in ordinary soil can be a mistake. Because they are desert plants, they do best in soil that dries quickly, provides aeration, and allows them to drain properly to prevent root rot. It’s usually a soil that contains some sort of gritty material, and this one does just that with a mixture of volcanic pumice, perlite, sand, and forest humus.

Buy now: Sun Gro Horticultural Black Gold Cactus Mix, $ 15

2. For succulents: Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil, $ 14

Like cacti, succulents also need fast-draining soil to avoid root rot and overwatering. This mixture, which contains bonsai block, monto clay and coconut fiber, keeps them healthy and allows them to dry well between waterings. The soil is also pH balanced and is ideal for acid loving succulents like echeveria, crassula, lithops, jade, aloe, haworthia, crassula, etc.

Buy now: Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Soil, $ 14

3. For orchids: Perfect Plants All Natural Orchid Potting, $ 15

best soil for plants

Orchids are not easy to care for plants, but using the right soil can help. This one is packed with nutrients, which allows its roots to climb and develop, as they like to do. It also provides proper aeration and drainage with a mixture of pine bark, charcoal, coconut chips, and spongy rock.

Buy now: Perfect Plants Natural Orchid Potting Mix, $ 15

4. For the garden: Wonder Soil Premium organic soil, $ 30

best soil for plants

This soil is an excellent choice for an outdoor garden or an indoor herb garden. To keep your plants healthy and help them grow strong, it contains coconut fiber, which has great water retention, helps drainage, and provides aeration. It also includes casts of worms (which the company says gives up to 25 percent more harvest), a beneficial fungus called mycorrhizae, kelp (which increases the shelf life of fruits and vegetables, as well as the resistance to disease and infestations), and perlite to prevent overwatering.

Buy Now: Wonder Soil Premium Organic Potting Mix, $ 30

5. For everything else: Miracle-Gro Indoor Potting Mix, $ 13

Now for the rest of your houseplants. This soil is ideal for just about any houseplant (except cacti, succulents, and orchids). It helps keep pests away and doesn’t contain materials like compost or bark that allow mushroom flies to thrive. It also contains coconut fiber to retain moisture in the soil.

Buy now: Miracle-Gro Indoor Potting Mix, $ 13

The best low light plants for your home:

Oh hi! You look like someone who enjoys free workouts, discounts for cult wellness brands, and exclusive Well + Good content. Sign up for Well +, our online community of wellness insiders, and unlock your rewards instantly.

Our editors independently select these products. Making a purchase through our links can earn a Well + Good commission.

]]>
Where does the earth come from? This Lancaster County company makes soil mixes to grow anything from flowers to cannabis [video] | Life & Culture https://rgbonsai.com/where-does-the-earth-come-from-this-lancaster-county-company-makes-soil-mixes-to-grow-anything-from-flowers-to-cannabis-video-life-culture/ Tue, 31 Mar 2020 15:48:11 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/where-does-the-earth-come-from-this-lancaster-county-company-makes-soil-mixes-to-grow-anything-from-flowers-to-cannabis-video-life-culture/ This story was originally published in March 2020. You have heard of topsoil and potting soil and maybe even seedling potting soil. Did you know that there are also organic soil, vegan soil, and soil mixes just for hanging baskets or cannabis? Chances are, some of the soil bags for your garden shed are made […]]]>

This story was originally published in March 2020.

You have heard of topsoil and potting soil and maybe even seedling potting soil. Did you know that there are also organic soil, vegan soil, and soil mixes just for hanging baskets or cannabis? Chances are, some of the soil bags for your garden shed are made in Lancaster County. Frey Group at the south end of Lancaster makes earth and sends it all over the East Coast and into the Midwest.

It’s a family business that started with a metal shop, added a sawmill, and started selling the leftover bark as mulch. Now the third generation is part of the team that offers new soil mixes.

So what exactly is soil?

The floor is not dirt. It contains nutrients to help plants grow, as well as things like beneficial fungi and bacteria.

“It’s an ecosystem,” says Dustin Frey, sales manager for the mid-Atlantic region.

Where does the earth come from? Frey Group, a company in the Quarryville area, shows how it makes custom soil mixes.






Make a potting soil

At the Frey Group headquarters in East Drumore Township, the soil begins in the form of towering piles of peat, coir, compost, fine pine bark and sand. Some of the materials need to be broken down to the right size. Some need to be old. Compost, for example, is ready after being heated, to kill internal seeds and pathogens, explains Felicia Newman, Quality Manager.

Each potting mix has its own recipe, like Frey’s most popular mix, the professional potting mix found in the Purple Bag. Soil amendments are mixed with inputs such as fertilizer, bone meal, blood meal, lobster meal, and perlite (to lighten the soil). There are also custom blends created to meet the needs of a client’s crop.






hemp 8




After the laws were changed to allow the cultivation of hemp, Frey created a custom hemp potting mix and worked with growers on the new recipe, says Dustin Frey.

Coast of Maine Organic Products, which Frey merged with in 2017, offers a personalized cannabis blend. Newman worked with home gardeners in Maine to develop this soil mix. In Maine, medical marijuana has been legal for two decades. Patients and caregivers can grow many of their own plants here at home. Frey has since created his own custom cannabis blend for professional growers.

Two mixes go to the Southeast Penn State Agricultural Research and Extension Center near Manheim. This year, more than a thousand flowers will be evaluated during the floral trials. Some, like geraniums, will be potted in a mix with a higher pH and others will be planted in a general flower mix, says Sinclair Adam, director of floral testing.






South East Ag 22.jpg




Inside the greenhouses of Green Leaf Plants in Lancaster County, where over 20 million starter plants are grown

The recipes for these blends are regularly modified to meet the needs of the plants. Adam likes being able to contact Frey and make these changes easily.

Other mixtures are in preparation. Peat thins the soil, retains moisture and improves soil structure, according to Oregon State University. However, peat takes hundreds of years to form. Frey hears from customers concerned about the use of a non-renewable resource. The company therefore plans to design peat-free mixtures as well as vegan mixtures made without animal by-products, such as blood meal or cow manure in the compost.

From metallurgy to mulch

Making land is the last hub of the business Dustin’s grandfather started in the 1960s. Ernie Frey started the business next to the family farm. There was a construction company and a metallurgy that specialized in equipping cattle. He added a sawmill and started selling the by-product, mulch. It took off and in the mid-1990s the company turned to mulch manufacturing. Later, they added soil mixes.

The second generation, siblings Ernie Frey Jr., Jamie Kreider and Karl Frey, took over the business. Now Dustin is the third generation.

The Philadelphia Flower Show's event manager started gardening as a child in Lancaster County

The company merged with Coast of Maine in 2017. After the merger, Frey went through the process of listing its products with the Organic Materials Review Institute, a non-profit organization that monitors biologics. The Lancaster operation now manufactures conventional soils and organic blends.

Some are bagged and shipped from Maine to South Carolina and as far west as Illinois. Some of it is trucked to customers, and some of the material just blows away in the wind. Lately, the company has used a drone to measure the size of piles of soil, mulch and inputs, Dustin said.

The land goes to garden centers to be sold to home growers. It also goes to large-scale growers in their own greenhouses.

Production increases in April and May to send fresh soil throughout the region, says Ernie Frey Jr., director of operations.

Step inside this New Holland hydroponic greenhouse run by volunteers

After a busy spring, the company plans to make some changes to help the environment. A new bag will include plastic made from sugar cane. Another bag will be recycled by Terracycle.

“I’m not a big fan of using plastic, and I know our industry is important for it,” Dustin said. “So it’s nice to see that we’re doing something to help clean it up. “

What's in your soil?  How to get it tested

]]>