art form http://rgbonsai.com/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 08:00:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png art form http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 The Full Surround Sounds range unveiled https://rgbonsai.com/the-full-surround-sounds-range-unveiled/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:58:16 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-full-surround-sounds-range-unveiled/ The month-long Surround Sounds live music program has been plugged in and expanded to 11. Released in full last week, the program features some of Australia’s biggest names and freshest faces in rock, pop, indie, doom, metal, jazz, classical, jazz and hip hop. It also celebrates the contemporary music scene and cultural heritage of Geelong […]]]>

The month-long Surround Sounds live music program has been plugged in and expanded to 11.

Released in full last week, the program features some of Australia’s biggest names and freshest faces in rock, pop, indie, doom, metal, jazz, classical, jazz and hip hop.

It also celebrates the contemporary music scene and cultural heritage of Geelong and Bellarine, and will run from April 7 to May 8 at venues and cultural spaces across the region.

Lineup includes Aussie favorites Crowded House, music icon Paul Kelly, world-renowned band The Rubens, country music stars Kasey Chambers and Busby Marou, Geelong local Adalita of Magic Dirt, indie band Children Collide, veteran rockers The Hard-Ons and beloved vocal quartet Human Nature perform at some of the best-known venues.

Other highlights include:

  • Nina Ferro and her jazz ensemble performing the songs of Ella Fitzgerald
  • A presentation of Music in Exile with performances by Ajak Kwai, Asecuma Beats and Gordon Koang
  • A Bonsai Records showcase featuring Bones & Jones, Fenn Wilson, Pollyman and Sirens
  • Album launches by Plaster of Paris, Baraka the Kid and doom bands Dr Colossus and Oceanlord, and
  • A First Nations celebration at Johnstone Park featuring Fred Leone, Bumpy, Deans of Soul and Loud & Deadly.

Adalita will drive busloads of music fans around the area on the Geelong Music Bus Tours alongside fellow local musician Mick Thomas (Weddings, Parties, Anything).

“Geelong is part of my musical heart,” she said.

“This is where I started as a musician, from grungy nooks and sticky carpet venues in the 90s, to its beautiful cool sounding halls and studios, it’s one of the most most important in Australian music.

“So much music has been formed here, and Geelong has a musical culture that spans many genres, from rock to jazz, punk to classical.

“So excited to be a part of Surround Sounds bringing together all this musical culture and history. Rock on, Geelong!”

The musical landscape of Geelong and the Bellarine will be explored through a curated series of in-depth conversations with musicians, including Eliza Hull, in a special showcase of deaf and disabled artists, cross art form installations and screenings live.

Greater Geelong City Deputy Mayor Trent Sullivan welcomed the huge list of beloved artists and musicians who will be the next big thing for all music lovers.

“Greater Geelong has a long and proud history of both producing talented musicians and having a strong reputation as a live music hub,” he said.
Surround Sounds Geelong and the Bellarine is supported by the Victorian Government through Creative Victoria.

For more information, the full program and ticket information, visit the Surround Sounds Geelong website.

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Gardener’s notebook: Carrot tops and bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/gardeners-notebook-carrot-tops-and-bonsai/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 12:28:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/gardeners-notebook-carrot-tops-and-bonsai/ YORKTON – What do carrot tops and bonsai have in common? Brew a cup of tea and sit down with me for a few minutes and I’ll tell you a story. A few weeks ago, I was cooking dinner and scraping carrots. One of the carrots had started to sprout, and as I cut off […]]]>

YORKTON – What do carrot tops and bonsai have in common? Brew a cup of tea and sit down with me for a few minutes and I’ll tell you a story.

A few weeks ago, I was cooking dinner and scraping carrots. One of the carrots had started to sprout, and as I cut off the top, I watched it closely. It was truly stunning, with the delicate lacy green leaves emerging from the bright orange top like a miniature forest. It was too pretty to throw away, so I put it in a small bowl with some water.

(Doesn’t that just show you how eager we are to see spring, to see new growth, when even a simple carrot catches our eye? But let me continue.)

When I looked at the top of the carrot, it looked very much like a very small bonsai tree. It made me want to learn more about this unique form of ‘gardening’, so travel with me now to Japan and let’s find out more about bonsai. Before Japanese bonsai, there was Chinese penzai: a process where the gardener tried to create a landscape scene in a small dish. But Japanese bonsai focused on a tree rather than a landscape.

Did you know that there are fifteen basic bonsai “styles”? While bonsai is certainly a creative process for the gardener to express themselves, there are certain styles that we imagine when we hear the word bonsai. There are tree-inclined, semi-cascading, windswept, and many others, including forest-style bonsai, yose-ue. This style has several trees of varying sizes, planted in a staggered pattern to resemble a natural forest. It is fascinating to see how this can be accomplished! I watched a video online and the gardener used seven maple seedlings, planting them all in a small ceramic planter that was probably six by eight inches and maybe two or three inches tall. It was amazing!

There is much more to bonsai than planting seedlings in a container and hoping for the best. Bonsai is a gardening process, but it’s also an art form, and it can last a lifetime.

Bonsai begins with planting the seedling, but there is pruning of roots and branches; the seedling may need to be wired to achieve a certain shape; and even the size of the leaves.

Once established, watering is the first and constant requirement; the plant will need to be repotted in time; and gardeners should be careful where the vegetable patch is placed, especially in winter. Our indoor climate with running furnaces, dry air and higher heat can cause problems for tree survival.

Many bonsai conventions are held every year in Japan; the oldest and most prestigious event is the Kokufu Bonsai Exhibition. This show showcases the efforts of the best and finest bonsai growers; wouldn’t that be amazing to see!

One of the most touching stories I’ve read is about a 390-year-old bonsai that survived Hiroshima. On August 6, 1945, when an atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima killing over 100,000 people, the tree survived. The Yamaki family, who had cared for the tree for more than five generations, donated it to the United States for the bicentennial in 1976, to be added to other bonsai donated by the Nippon Bonsai Association. The tree now resides in Washington DC and represents a message of peace.

And I learned all this because of a carrot! We never stop learning!

Thank you to our friends at YTW for their continued commitment to local news. Check out what’s new from the Yorkton hort society at www.yorktonhort.ca and have a great week!

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‘Bonsai Factory’, The Theory and Practice of Bonsai Cultivation – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-factory-the-theory-and-practice-of-bonsai-cultivation-the-new-indian-express/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-factory-the-theory-and-practice-of-bonsai-cultivation-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service The cramped neighborhood of Rohini in West Delhi, home to tall buildings and tiny balconies, includes a terrace that houses hundreds of small bonsai trees, adding greenery to the cityscape. The work of 79-year-old Mangat Singh Thakur, this bonsai garden features more than 550 bonsai trees, including species like Chinese orange, mango, […]]]>

Express press service

The cramped neighborhood of Rohini in West Delhi, home to tall buildings and tiny balconies, includes a terrace that houses hundreds of small bonsai trees, adding greenery to the cityscape.

The work of 79-year-old Mangat Singh Thakur, this bonsai garden features more than 550 bonsai trees, including species like Chinese orange, mango, guava, which Thakur has diligently maintained since 2001. Its compact terrace is the place where he experiments with art.

Thakur believes bonsai cultivation is not just a routine practice; it is an art, a philosophy and a form of exercise. His interest and willingness to continue working despite his advanced age keeps him going.

Bonsai plant from China orange

years of learning
A traditional Japanese art form, bonsai cultivation refers to the practice of growing a plant in a miniature form. A bonsai tree, if planted and cared for properly, can live for hundreds of years.

Thakur first discovered the concept in 1978 at a workshop organized by the Indian Bonsai Association at ITC Maurya in Delhi. Here, Thakur understood the basics of these plants. “The more I learned, the more interested I became,” he says. After retiring in 2001, Thakur decided to carve out more space for himself to get serious about bonsai planting.

The first bonsai he planted was a banyan tree in 1972, which is still in good condition on his terrace. “This tree accompanied me throughout my transfers to various places in India. It taught me a lot about this art,” he comments.

As his collection grows day by day, Thakur makes it a point to spend two to three hours in his garden. During potting season (usually February), he works on his plants for about six hours.

Catalyst for change
Thakur was able to introduce the theory and practice of bonsai cultivation to a wide audience. He regularly posts informative bonsai videos on his “Bonsai Factory” YouTube channel – he has over 9,000 subscribers – and also hosts virtual classes for enthusiasts. He taught over 100 students in nine batches; its tenth batch begins in February.

Thakur’s work has also been widely appreciated. “I became more popular after my retirement than when I worked in the bank (laughs).”

Hoping to take these lessons forward, Thakur is writing a book on bonsai planting in Hindi. Understanding bonsai can help farmers use their resources properly, and so, Thakur adds, his book will be geared towards farmers and gardeners.

“Most bonsai books are in English and are expensive. I thought I should write in Hindi so that it reaches the common man. I also plan to keep the cost low so people can easily buy these books,” he says.

Although he is no less than a master of bonsai cultivation who is well versed in the ins and outs of this art form, Thakur still considers himself a student. “I am not an artist. I am simply a student and will remain so until the day I die,” he concludes.

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This banker has 550 trees on his terrace! https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s. This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. […]]]>

MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s.

This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. Leila Dhanda popularized the art form in the capital by founding the Indian Bonsai Association. “And I was lucky enough to come across a group of women who worked for her, in a vegetable garden that I frequented,” he says.

“I didn’t even know what a bonsai was at the time, and oddly enough, they didn’t really have a clue either. However, they walked me through the basics and I attended my first workshop at the (ITC) Maurya Sheraton soon after. I come from very humble beginnings and was hesitant to even enter the hotel premises. But as I learned more about how to grow bonsai at home, I only became more interested in the art,” he adds.

Despite his inclinations, Mangat’s work and family responsibilities kept him busy until 2001. Then, as a retired man, he was finally able to devote most of his days to perfecting a green thumb and cultivates currently up to 550 bonsai trees on its roof. terrace in Rohini.

“About 35 years ago, I potted my first bonsai, a banyan tree. I still have it today. In the early years, I spent hours meditating on books on bonsai techniques. But of the dozens of books available in my neighborhood libraries, only a few were written in Hindi. I decided that if I ever had the chance, I would write one myself. And now I am, ”says Mangat The best India.

Since 2019, he has also been sharing detailed video tutorials on growing and caring for the exotic plant on Bonsai Factory, his YouTube channel with nearly 9,000 subscribers.

“For the past few years, my main focus has been to bring bonsai techniques to the common man across the country. If we introduce it to marginalized farmers in rural and remote areas, they can make good use of their existing land and resources to establish a highly profitable model. With my videos, [I hope] they can at least discover that they have the possibility to do it and find out how to start,” he adds.

Although Mangat has finished writing his book, he says the accompanying photographs and illustrations are not yet complete, adding that he is planning a release in April next year.

“More a work of art than hard work”

“The best thing about growing bonsai is that you don’t need any special seeds to start with. You can use any plant that has the ability to grow into a tree,” he notes. Here, ‘bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘sai’ means ‘tree’, so it is not a separate species, but rather a miniature form of a larger tree. Yet, I find it really fascinating that the fruit of bonsai is the same size as a tree.

“People often make growing bonsai a time-consuming and expensive affair. But it’s more of a work of art than hard work. If you spend time understanding the basics of feeding a bonsai tree, you can make one easily and ensure that it will survive for decades,” he says.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Mangat has also started taking online courses to raise awareness of bonsai cultivation techniques. He says the sessions are priced at Rs 5,000 per participant for a 15-day batch, and they focus only on theoretical concepts for the first 10.

“Even a doctor spends two-thirds of his life buried in books. I don’t claim to be able to make anyone master the subject in two weeks, but enough is learned to pursue it with consideration. I have taught over 150 people so far, from high school students to managers, pilots and engineers. I am proud to do this work at 80 years old,” he shares.

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How to make bonsai soil:

Mangat points out that the first thing to keep in mind when growing bonsai trees is that their maximum height is only three feet. “They are grown in a confined space and in limited soil, so their roots don’t spread like large trees and require more nutrition through the soil,” he says.

“There are a lot of things to consider when preparing the soil. It should be light, but rich in nutrients at the same time,” says Mangat. “For this you can combine 15% nursery soil, 10% manure, 3% neem cake fertilizer, 4-5% chalk, 10% pit sand (badarpur), 5% brick chunks, 5% raw charcoal chunks, 2% ash-based fertilizer, 10% coir dust, 10% bone meal and 15% dry leaves. You can also add a few pieces of rotten wood to spice up the mix.

After mixing these ingredients well, Mangat says, you have to pass the mixture through three types of sieves with different sizes of holes. “After straining the potting mix through the first sieve, any large stones or twigs that remain should be kept separately in a plastic container. This is the first type of soil,” he adds.

After filtering the remaining soil, pass it through the second sieve. Remove the soil that remains in this sieve and store it in another container – this is the second type of soil.

Now the soil you get after sieving through the second sieve should be sieved through the third sieve. Soil that does not filter through the third sieve is the third type of soil. After filtering, the remaining fine soil is the fourth type of soil.

Soils should not be stored in polythene, but rather collected in separate utensils or containers and dried in the sun. “We need thick clay for bonsai. If we keep its floor in polyethylene, then moisture gets in and the floor begins to break. One should also avoid mixing any type of chemicals into the bonsai soil, as this will shorten its lifespan,” Mangat explains.

Before planting bonsai in a pot, you must first put the “thick soil” – the first type of soil. After that, the second type of soil should be added, then the third, and the layers should be pressed tightly with your hands. Do not completely fill the jar.

Now place the bonsai there. Add more soil and press it down using any wood. Now place the bonsai in a tub or bucket filled with water. After leaving it in water for three to four hours, place the bonsai in a shady spot.

Other bonsai care tips:

  • Mangat says that watering bonsai trees is also a work of art. You cannot add as much water to it as other trees. Keep in mind that you are giving water in such a way that it does not stay in the pot at all. Bonsai roots are small, and if there is stagnation of water in the pot, the roots start to get damaged, he notes.
  • Avoid giving any type of chemical fertilizer; it is recommended to use only organic manure in bonsai.
  • Don’t apply too much fertilizer at one time. You can apply small amounts of manure at weekly intervals per month, three to four times. It makes bonsai healthier.
  • The wires are used to make bonsai. Therefore, you should also keep checking if a wire periodically damages the bonsai. If you feel the wire is cutting the bonsai, you can remove the wire and restructure it again.
  • Bonsai need to be pruned and “repotted” regularly, says Mangat.
  • After you start repotting, you don’t need to fertilize the bonsai for about a month, he adds. Then you can give the plant liquid manure, only in the evening. In addition to the roots, the bonsai leaves should also be sprayed.

For more information, you can follow Bonsai Factory.

You can read this story in Hindi here.

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Bonsai Show returns to NC Research Campus | Local News https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-show-returns-to-nc-research-campus-local-news/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-show-returns-to-nc-research-campus-local-news/ In addition to the top-quality bonsai on display, those who want to get started in bonsai as well as experienced hobbyists can visit more than 50 tables of pre-bonsai planting material and bonsai supplies for sale at the show. Exceptional bonsai pots will also be sold. Bonsai is an ancient art form, originating in China […]]]>

In addition to the top-quality bonsai on display, those who want to get started in bonsai as well as experienced hobbyists can visit more than 50 tables of pre-bonsai planting material and bonsai supplies for sale at the show. Exceptional bonsai pots will also be sold.

Bonsai is an ancient art form, originating in China and later adopted by the Japanese. The word bonsai, in Japanese, means “tree in a pot”. The oldest trees in the United States were a gift from Japan during the country’s bicentennial (1976). A tree, still on display at the National Arboretum, dates from before Christopher Columbus discovered America and was a gift from the Japanese government to the United States on our 200th anniversary.






High: With the exception of tropical bonsai trees, such as fig trees, bonsai trees must be kept outdoors to live. Law: The Winter Silhouette Bonsai Show is coming to Kannapolis. A small bonsai exhibit is held in June in Kannapolis and an annual exhibit is held at the NC Arboretum in Asheville.


Photos submitted



Why would anyone choose bonsai as a hobby? It is a mixture of sculpture and gardening. Trees get better the more you work on them, so patience is a virtue. Bonsai trees are normal trees that are styled by wiring their branches to create the image of an old tree, and they are kept small by root pruning. These trees could grow in a yard to their full size if allowed.

Only tropical bonsai (like figs) can be kept indoors; most bonsai must be kept outdoors to survive. The art of bonsai is to make trees appear like old miniature trees. On display at the show: isolated trees as well as groups of trees that will remind you of past hikes in the forest.

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The Ever-Evolving Bonsai Art https://rgbonsai.com/the-ever-evolving-bonsai-art/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-ever-evolving-bonsai-art/ The practice of miniaturizing factories is believed to have come to Japan from China around the 7th century, when the two countries formally established diplomatic relations. At that time, Chinese gardeners had probably created potted landscapes, or penjing (“pot landscape”), for hundreds of years, bringing nature into the homes of political elites, painters and calligraphers. […]]]>

The practice of miniaturizing factories is believed to have come to Japan from China around the 7th century, when the two countries formally established diplomatic relations. At that time, Chinese gardeners had probably created potted landscapes, or penjing (“pot landscape”), for hundreds of years, bringing nature into the homes of political elites, painters and calligraphers. Penjing, as it developed over the centuries, did not idealize nature, but rather depicted – or, as some bonsai scholars suggest, exaggerated – its strange and expansive beauty. Until the 1970s, when the Chinese government began codifying five regional schools of penjing, each with its own approach to styling local species through cutting, wiring or pinching, there were few rules: the first guides published in the 16th and 17th centuries suggested that practitioners should attempt to emulate values ​​such as vigor and austerity depicted in classical landscape painting, says Phillip E. Bloom, the 38-year-old curator of the Huntington Library’s Chinese Garden, from the Museum of Art and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California. Often the principles were abstract—a craftsman might have aimed, says Bloom, to “somehow create heaven in the tree”—which left penjing open to poetic interpretation.

By the 12th century, Japanese craftsmen and monks had also evolved the art into a form of controlled observation, later known as bonsai (“pot planting”); while the term itself had been around for centuries, it took until the Meiji era (1868-1912) for it to take on its modern meaning. By then, researchers had begun to rank such things as trunk shape, branch location, and preferred species – any locally grown woody-stemmed perennial with true branches and relatively small leaves, including including pine, maple, juniper, beech, elm, cherry and plum. Bonsai trees could range in size from a few centimeters tall to imperial trees that could exceed six feet. Regardless of size, species, or age, each tree exuded the sublime beauty of an ancient forest. Today, Hitomi Kawasaki, 41, a Kyoto-based bonsai curator and scholar, compares the ideal form of classic bonsai to the Kamae Nô theater posture, with the actor’s knees slightly bent and arms away from the body. “If you’re in that position, that’s the most stable point, and if you can let go, it’s almost like floating,” Kawasaki says. “With bonsai, it’s similar: there is a point of balance, you reinforce this point and everything takes shape.” When practitioners do this, their trees can survive them for centuries, their growth slowed, but never completely halted, by confinement; if the specimens are unbalanced, they eventually wither. Between control and abandonment, creation and destruction, life and death, art is, as Kawasaki writes in a forthcoming essay, “an attempt to find a middle way out of dualism.”

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This Shop Brings the Art of Japanese Bonsai to Vancouver https://rgbonsai.com/this-shop-brings-the-art-of-japanese-bonsai-to-vancouver/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-shop-brings-the-art-of-japanese-bonsai-to-vancouver/ Made in Vancouver is a collaboration between Vancity and Daily Hive. Together, we shine the spotlight on local businesses, organizations and individuals who are helping to create a healthy local economy. Best Coast Bonsai is a Vancouver-based bonsai shop specializing in Japanese style plant arrangements and bonsai. As part of our Made in Vancouver series […]]]>

Made in Vancouver is a collaboration between Vancity and Daily Hive. Together, we shine the spotlight on local businesses, organizations and individuals who are helping to create a healthy local economy.


Best Coast Bonsai is a Vancouver-based bonsai shop specializing in Japanese style plant arrangements and bonsai.

As part of our Made in Vancouver series highlighting local businesses, we spoke to Tom Uleckithe owner and artist behind Best Coast Bonsai about this beautiful plant art form.

Through September 30, Vancity enviro™ Visa* cardholders will earn 1.5 times the rewards points at select businesses through the Load on Local program. To learn more, visit vancity.com/local

Operating out of East Van, Tom Ulecki creates high quality bonsai and kusamono master pieces based on techniques he learned while apprenticed in Osaka, Japan. The west coast of Canada is an ideal place for bonsai trees to grow and thrive. After returning to Vancouver, Tom launched Best Coast Bonsai. With bonsai and kusamono arrangements, the boutique offers consultation, styling and tree rental services.

“There are very few people who have been able to learn in Japan on the same scale as me. It was a rare learning opportunity, and I hope I can bring my knowledge of the art of bonsai to Vancouver The bonsai and kusamono developed by Best Coast Bonsai are of very high quality,” said Tom Ulecki in an interview with Daily Hive.

Kusamono plant arrangements are based on Japanese techniques. Each plant features a unique blend of Pacific Northwest flora like ferns, mosses and other varieties. these local, natural and reusable plant centerpieces have become a popular decor for weddings, events and instead bouquets of fresh flowers.

‘Kusamono actually gets more interesting over time. As they age, they develop more character and personality. It is durable because kusamono is reusable and it reflects the natural beauty that surrounds us. Bonsai allows us to get in touch with nature even in our urban environment.’

Tom has always had a passion for the environment, the arts and plants. He is also a visual artist under the pseudonym notanautomatom. Her strong background in painting has helped develop her dedication to the design aspects and fine detail of bonsai and plant arrangements.

“I hope my passion can transfer into my larger goal of trying to protect our natural environment. There are very few people who get into bonsai without caring about the environment and the challenges that society faces. is about to face.

Although this is a new venture that has faced many challenges due to the pandemic, the return of weddings and events creates a busy season ahead for Best Coast Bonsai.

“It’s rewarding to see the plants at the event and how unique they are. Seeing people experience the product and really enjoy it makes the hard work worth it. »

To learn more about Best Coast Bonsai, visit their website and Instagram

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Make the beauty of bonsai permanent https://rgbonsai.com/make-the-beauty-of-bonsai-permanent/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/make-the-beauty-of-bonsai-permanent/ COLTS NECK – Rich Taylor grew up seeing his father’s interest in bonsai. They also piqued his interest. It won’t be long before Taylor incorporates his own adaptation, called Agapi Trees. “I’ve always had this fascination with them,” Taylor said, referring to bonsai, a Japanese art form that actually creates miniature trees. “My father was […]]]>

COLTS NECK – Rich Taylor grew up seeing his father’s interest in bonsai. They also piqued his interest. It won’t be long before Taylor incorporates his own adaptation, called Agapi Trees.

“I’ve always had this fascination with them,” Taylor said, referring to bonsai, a Japanese art form that actually creates miniature trees. “My father was passionate about bonsai and I watched him buy and handle them. As they grew and evolved he would work with them and go through the whole process, always bringing it to fruition. It has always been a daily regimen and it takes a lot of time and effort.

Taylor honed his artistic side at a young age in school.

“In high school, I won with a lot of art lessons,” Taylor said. “I then went on to study architecture at the University of Houston in Houston, Texas, where I grew up and lived most of my life. I quickly learned that I was not the best student in school, but I always had an affinity for art and I loved doing it.

Richard Taylor, artist and owner of Agapi Tree, a Colts Neck-based company that creates and sells bonsai-style tree sculptures, talks about his craft and business in his studio on Wednesday, August 4, 2021.

“The most amazing part for me was the design and concept aspect of it,” Taylor said. “Unfortunately, I quickly realized that finishing it just wasn’t in my cards and gave up after a short time there.”

Colts Neck Company:Source Brewing has its roots on a farm in NJ. Now it extends to Philly’s Fishtown

Moving to the East Coast

While studying there, Taylor worked for a time in the mailroom of an accounting firm, where he ended up meeting his future wife.

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Surveillance video captures thieves stealing bonsai trees from St. Paul’s house – WCCO https://rgbonsai.com/surveillance-video-captures-thieves-stealing-bonsai-trees-from-st-pauls-house-wcco/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/surveillance-video-captures-thieves-stealing-bonsai-trees-from-st-pauls-house-wcco/ MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A St. Paul couple are asking for the community’s help in identifying the thieves who stole a number of their bonsai trees over the weekend. The couple, who do not wish to be named, say the trees were stolen from an exhibit outside their home in the West 7th Street neighborhood. The […]]]>

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A St. Paul couple are asking for the community’s help in identifying the thieves who stole a number of their bonsai trees over the weekend.

The couple, who do not wish to be named, say the trees were stolen from an exhibit outside their home in the West 7th Street neighborhood. The thieves took several of the meticulously grown small trees outside, even though they were drilled into a bench and lit by spotlights.

The owners estimate the loss at thousands of dollars. One of them has been working with bonsai for about five years.

(credit: CBS)

The first theft happened two weeks ago, when one of the largest trees was stolen. After that, the owners tied and bolted the remaining trees to the show bench. They originally planned to put a fence around the screen, but cost became an issue.

Early Saturday, surveillance video captured three people stealing several of the remaining trees. The video shows the thieves apparently pulling up in a van and, within three minutes, they were cutting through the strips holding down the trees and fleeing with at least half a dozen plants. In their back and forth to put the plants in the van, one of the thieves trips over a lawn mower.

The couple have shared surveillance video on social media and are asking anyone who recognizes the thieves to come forward. The owners say they have filed a report with St. Paul police. WCCO-TV is working to verify this.

Bonsai is an ancient art form practiced in Japan since the 6th century. It usually features trees or shrubs grown in small containers, and growers spend hours cutting, wiring, and fertilizing the plants to create a unique living display.

(credit: CBS)

Nicholas Ehlers, outreach director for the Minnesota Bonsai Society, said while a new plant from a nursery might cost $10 to $50, a quality tree, like those on display at the Como Zoo and Conservatory, might cost hundreds or thousands. .

“Even if it’s not show quality, you still have to put in hours of watering and tending to the trees to get them to this point, which can take years,” he said. -he declares.

While Ehlers says bonsai thefts don’t happen often in Minnesota, it has happened in the past.

“We are very careful with the information we give out about members for this exact reason,” he said.

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How to care for bonsai – top tips for caring for compact plants https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC. The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old. Although these beautiful […]]]>

While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC.

The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old.

Although these beautiful trees are commonly associated with Japan, bonsai cultivation began in China, where they became associated with Zen Buddhism.

Shannen Godwin, spokesperson for JParker’s, said, “Bonsai is a living art form that results from the vision of replicating the natural growth and shape of trees, even on a much smaller scale.

“We have noticed that this technique has started to become more popular as people look to improve their skills and the appearance of their gardens.

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“It is important to learn that anyone can engage in this ancient practice and find comfort in it, because it is so much more than a variety of trees; it’s a way to bring many varieties to life.

Most Britons, when they think of bonsai, imagine a small potted tree kept in the corner of a living room.

But, some bonsai trees can and should be located outdoors. Here’s a guide to caring for these quiet plants.

How to choose your bonsai

There are many types of bonsai and not all types are the same.

Not all species will be adapted to the unpredictable UK climate.

In most cases it will be too cold to grow bonsai outside the UK.

Most Brits choose to grow bonsai indoors, these compact plants take up little space and can be grown in a container making them the perfect houseplant.

A popular bonsai species well suited to growing indoors is the Ficus, it is easy to grow for novice gardeners, so if you have recently started gardening this might be the perfect choice for you.

Other popular varieties include; Carmona Bonsai, Chinese Elm Bonsai, Crassula (Jade) Bonsai and Serissa Japonica (Snow Rose) Bonsai.

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How to take care of your bonsai

Instead, you should aim to discourage growth at the top of your bonsai, encouraging it to grow downwards.

Your tree should look full and mature on the lower branches and more spindly at the top.

A popular option is to choose a tree with an interesting trunk because the bonsai roots are visible.

The bonsai’s roots are as much a part of the plant’s display as its green foliage.

The branches of your tree will also require attention. They can be shaped in a pattern of choice or you can even shape the branches to grow from side to side.

This can be done by completely stripping the tree of its branches and then rubbing the buds from the side where growth is not desired.

How to water bonsai

These plants have very specific watering needs, to water your bonsai you should submerge the entire bonsai plant in a bucket of water whenever the topsoil seems completely dry. It’s usually about once a week.

Once you have completely submerged your tree in the bucket of water, wait until all air bubbles have risen to the top.

When this has happened, the bonsai has absorbed enough water and can be removed from the bucket.

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