art growing – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 19:32:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png art growing – RG Bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 How to care for bonsai – top tips for caring for compact plants https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC. The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old. Although these beautiful […]]]>

While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC.

The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old.

Although these beautiful trees are commonly associated with Japan, bonsai cultivation began in China, where they became associated with Zen Buddhism.

Shannen Godwin, spokesperson for JParker’s, said, “Bonsai is a living art form that results from the vision of replicating the natural growth and shape of trees, even on a much smaller scale.

“We have noticed that this technique has started to become more popular as people look to improve their skills and the appearance of their gardens.

READ MORE: When to prune a beech hedge: T When op tips and advice for hedge pruning

“It is important to learn that anyone can engage in this ancient practice and find comfort in it, because it is so much more than a variety of trees; it’s a way to bring many varieties to life.

Most Britons, when they think of bonsai, imagine a small potted tree kept in the corner of a living room.

But, some bonsai trees can and should be located outdoors. Here’s a guide to caring for these quiet plants.

How to choose your bonsai

There are many types of bonsai and not all types are the same.

Not all species will be adapted to the unpredictable UK climate.

In most cases it will be too cold to grow bonsai outside the UK.

Most Brits choose to grow bonsai indoors, these compact plants take up little space and can be grown in a container making them the perfect houseplant.

A popular bonsai species well suited to growing indoors is the Ficus, it is easy to grow for novice gardeners, so if you have recently started gardening this might be the perfect choice for you.

Other popular varieties include; Carmona Bonsai, Chinese Elm Bonsai, Crassula (Jade) Bonsai and Serissa Japonica (Snow Rose) Bonsai.

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How to take care of your bonsai

Instead, you should aim to discourage growth at the top of your bonsai, encouraging it to grow downwards.

Your tree should look full and mature on the lower branches and more spindly at the top.

A popular option is to choose a tree with an interesting trunk because the bonsai roots are visible.

The bonsai’s roots are as much a part of the plant’s display as its green foliage.

The branches of your tree will also require attention. They can be shaped in a pattern of choice or you can even shape the branches to grow from side to side.

This can be done by completely stripping the tree of its branches and then rubbing the buds from the side where growth is not desired.

How to water bonsai

These plants have very specific watering needs, to water your bonsai you should submerge the entire bonsai plant in a bucket of water whenever the topsoil seems completely dry. It’s usually about once a week.

Once you have completely submerged your tree in the bucket of water, wait until all air bubbles have risen to the top.

When this has happened, the bonsai has absorbed enough water and can be removed from the bucket.

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6 types of bonsai that are best for beginners https://rgbonsai.com/6-types-of-bonsai-that-are-best-for-beginners/ Fri, 14 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/6-types-of-bonsai-that-are-best-for-beginners/ istockphoto.com Bonsai, a horticultural art originating in ancient China, is still a popular hobby today. A common misconception is that bonsai is a type of tree. In fact, bonsai refers to the craft or art of growing, shaping and caring for tiny trees. Like their full-sized siblings, bonsai trees can survive for hundreds of years. […]]]>

istockphoto.com

Bonsai, a horticultural art originating in ancient China, is still a popular hobby today. A common misconception is that bonsai is a type of tree. In fact, bonsai refers to the craft or art of growing, shaping and caring for tiny trees.

Like their full-sized siblings, bonsai trees can survive for hundreds of years. Some even outlived their keepers. A Japanese white pine from the collection of the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in Washington DC, for example, has been in formation since 1625, making it almost 400 years old.

Those looking to try their hand at bonsai should know that it takes time and patience to master the craft. With practice, however, it is possible to turn unwieldy saplings into works of art. The first step in this long and rewarding process is to choose the right tree, the one suitable for beginners. Here are the top contenders.

1. ficus

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

While most people associate bonsai trees with indoor displays, many varieties do better outdoors. This can make it difficult for those who live in colder climates to get into the hobby. Fortunately, some trees, for example the ficus, thrive in an indoor environment. The two varieties best suited to growing indoors are Ficus retusa and Ficus ginseng., both of which have visually interesting trunks. However, those living in USDA zones 10 and 11 can get away with growing most ficus species outdoors.

What makes ficuses so adaptable is their ability to respond positively to increasing restrictions. In bonsai, the selection of a small container is essential to limit the size of the plant. Because ficuses are happy in smaller containers, they are well suited for bonsai. They also forgive mistakes in watering and other types of care. Ficus plants, for example, are generally not afraid of the dry conditions of indoor environments. Just be sure to choose a sunny spot for your mini ficus.

2. Chinese Elm

types of bonsai

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This slow growing plant is perfect for bonsai beginners as it can keep content almost anywhere. Chinese elm trees do just as well indoors as they do outdoors and can survive outdoors in USDA zones 4 through 9. Just be sure to choose a spot with plenty of morning sun that gets shady l ‘afternoon.

Another reason this tree is ideal for bonsai art is that it is easy to prune and its slow growth makes shaping simple. The trees are also not very susceptible to pest infestations, with the exception of spider mites. But these little insects are usually easily controlled with a few applications of neem oil.

RELATED: 12 Stunning Dwarf Trees Perfect For Big Yards Or Small Yards

3. Juniper

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

This needle-leaved tree is very attractive in miniature form. It is important to note, however, that junipers do not do well indoors. Instead, grow these trees outdoors in USDA Zones 4 through 9. Place them in a location where they can receive at least 4 hours of sunlight per day. Unlike other less hardy, bonsai-friendly trees, junipers can handle the cold.

As with other beginner-friendly bonsai trees, junipers are resistant to pests. However, spider mites and corn borers sometimes target them. Prevent infestations with regular pruning to keep the leaves from getting too messy. Juniper is also perfect for bonsai beginners as it tolerates over-pruning well. Although aggressive pruning can weaken them and cause browning, trees will eventually recover from pruning errors.

4. Cotoneaster

types of bonsai

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These trees, small at first, lend themselves well to the art of bonsai. Native to three continents – Asia, Europe and Africa – cotoneasters feature glossy green leaves and small, apple-shaped fruits that appear after a bloom of small white flowers.

To grow cotoneasters, choose a spot with full sun, either indoors or outdoors. Provide frost protection for container plants, although cotoneasters planted in the ground should tolerate frost fairly well. Most varieties are cold hardy in zones 5 through 8, but hardiness varies by variety. Unlike more difficult bonsai species, these trees are drought tolerant as long as dry periods are short. Also, since the branches of cotoneasters are flexible, they support shaping well via wires.

RELATED: The Most Expensive Houseplants People Actually Buy

5. Portulacaria

types of bonsai

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Portulacaria trees, also known as dwarf jade or baby jade, are excellent beginner bonsai species because they don’t need regular watering. If you have a habit of killing plants with your poor watering habits, this might be the right tree for you to try bonsai growing methods. Just be careful not to over the wateras these trees are susceptible to root rot.

When shaping portulacarians, avoid wires and stick to a neat size. Because they grow quickly, regular pruning is necessary to maintain an aesthetic shape. You can keep baby jades outside during the summer, but ideally they should be brought in when nighttime lows reach 40 degrees. In zones 10 and 11, it is possible to grow baby jade outdoors, but the succulent is also perfect for indoor environments.

6. Rosemary

types of bonsai

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Make edible art by choosing a rosemary plant for your bonsai hobby. Even better, when you prune your rosemary bonsai, you’re not only helping to maintain the shape of the plant, but you’re also cleaning up the herbs for dinner. Frequent watering is necessary for rosemary plants to thrive, but they are also vulnerable to root rot, so be sure to keep the plants in a pot with ample drainage.

To maintain the plant’s miniature size, remove new shoots that appear after the first set of leaves. Cutting off at least 25% of the roots will help prevent the plant from overgrowing its pot. You can shape the branches with wiring as long as they are young and flexible enough.

Another advantage of choosing rosemary as a small “tree” is that you can quickly start it from seed. Grow this herb in containers and bring it in before the first frost.

Other herbs suitable for growing bonsai include:

  • Thyme
  • Lavender
  • Oregano
  • bay laurel
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Alameda bonsai expert on the resurgence of horticultural art https://rgbonsai.com/alameda-bonsai-expert-on-the-resurgence-of-horticultural-art/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/alameda-bonsai-expert-on-the-resurgence-of-horticultural-art/ Alameda’s Jonas Dupuich is a giant in the bonsai world – he teaches and lectures and runs the popular blog Bonsai Tonight, and his book, “The Little Book of Bonsai”, was published last year by Ten Speed Press. Podcasts are his new project. As interest in bonsai increased during the pandemic, he branched out into […]]]>

Alameda’s Jonas Dupuich is a giant in the bonsai world – he teaches and lectures and runs the popular blog Bonsai Tonight, and his book, “The Little Book of Bonsai”, was published last year by Ten Speed Press. Podcasts are his new project. As interest in bonsai increased during the pandemic, he branched out into this medium. We spoke with him about the art of growing small and how those who admire bonsai can grow from hobbyist to grower.

Q How would you describe bonsai to someone unfamiliar with this garden art?

A “Bonsai,” which translates to “tray planting” in Japanese, refers to the practice of growing small trees in containers that evoke larger trees in nature.

Q How did you come to bonsai?

A After college I was working in the family business, Encinal Nursery in Alameda, when I met a bonsai teacher from Hayward named Boon Manakitivipart, who over the next few years became one of the most prominent teachers in the country. I studied with Boon for over 20 years.

Q Why are we seeing a resurgence of interest in bonsai today?

A Bonsai is a great alternative to our increasingly digital culture that allows people to embrace their horticultural and artistic side.

Q What qualities do you need to become a good bonsai grower? Let’s say someone has a good eye for design but has never had a green thumb. Would this person be a candidate?

A The most successful bonsai growers care deeply about their trees and are always curious about how they can increase the beauty of a bonsai while maintaining its health. It’s not hard to learn the basics of horticulture, but you can spend years honing your technique or artistic sensibility.

Q How much does it cost to get into bonsai?

A Getting started can be as simple as picking up an inexpensive tree for $20 to $50 at a garden center and pruning it to your liking. Your local state park is one of the best places to study tree growth in your area. Take note of which species thrive, if you are looking for species to train into bonsai. If you have an outdoor space, a juniper is ideal.

Q What kind of time commitment is involved?

A As little as a few minutes a day. Most trees require regular watering and seasonal pruning.

Q Can you keep a bonsai indoors?

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The ancient history and symbolic meaning of bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/the-ancient-history-and-symbolic-meaning-of-bonsai/ Sat, 06 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-ancient-history-and-symbolic-meaning-of-bonsai/ Photo: Photos by Thanun Patiparnthada/Shutterstock Bonsai trees have a strong association with Japan. But did you know that the art of growing miniature trees actually originated in ancient China? In 700 CE, the Chinese used special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers. The practice became known as “pun-sai” (or “penzai”) and was originally cultivated […]]]>

Photo: Photos by Thanun Patiparnthada/Shutterstock

Bonsai trees have a strong association with Japan. But did you know that the art of growing miniature trees actually originated in ancient China? In 700 CE, the Chinese used special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers. The practice became known as “pun-sai” (or “penzai”) and was originally cultivated only by the elite of society. It was not until the Kamakura period (1185 to 1333) that the cultivation of miniature trees in pots was introduced to Japan. And today, even western nature lovers grow and care for bonsai like living works of art.

Read on to learn the history and meaning of these special trees.

a bonsai

A Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) bonsai, China Collection 111, on display at the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in the United States National Arboretum. (Photo: WikimediaCommons (CC BY-SA 3.0))

What is the meaning of the term bonsai?

Bonsai is a Japanese word meaning “tree in a pot”. However, the term originally comes from the Chinese word “pun-sai” or “penjing”. In Chinese, “pen” means pot and “jing” means decor or landscape.

Bonsai trees are meant to be a miniature representation of nature, planted in decorative containers.

What does bonsai symbolize?

When bonsai trees were first introduced to China over 1,300 years ago, they were considered a status symbol among the elite of society. Today, however, bonsai trees are enjoyed by people all over the world.

Depending on a person’s culture or beliefs, bonsai trees are considered symbols of harmony, balance, patience, or even luck. Many people simply use potted trees as living ornaments for interior decoration, while others – Zen Buddhists for example – think of bonsai as an object of meditation or contemplation.

The history of bonsai in China

a bonsai

Penzai mural in the Tang dynasty tomb of Prince Zhanghuai, 706 AD (Photo: WikimediaCommons Public Domain)

In ancient China, early explorers were probably the first to discover miniature trees growing high in the mountains. This climate saw harsh conditions where growth was difficult, so the prized dwarf trees were particularly gnarled in appearance. As early as the 4th century BCE, Taoists believed that recreating aspects of nature in miniature allowed people to access their magical properties. Hence, penjing was born. It involved creating miniature landscapes displayed on earthenware.

In an effort to recreate the natural trees they found in the mountains, the Chinese developed pruning and binding techniques that gave plants twisted shapes and an aged look. Some historians believe that the Taoists shaped the branches and trunks of miniature trees to resemble animals from Chinese folklore, such as dragons and snakes. Others believe that the distorted plant formations resemble yoga positions.

The first pictorial evidence of artistically formed miniature trees appeared in 706 CE in the tomb of Prince Zhang Huai. Upon entering, archaeologists discovered murals depicting servant girls wearing penjing, which contained miniature trees and rocks.

The history of bonsai in Japan

a bonsai

Japanese woodblock print by Keisai Eisen, 1848 (Photo: WikimediaCommons (CC0 1.0))

During the reign of the Hang dynasty, Chinese monks migrated to Japan and other parts of Asia, taking with them examples of penzai. Japanese Zen Buddhist monks learned the techniques needed to make miniature trees, later known as bonsai. The Japanese developed their own methods for creating dwarf trees, resulting in different styles compared to Chinese penzai.

Japanese bonsai trees were usually about one to two feet tall and required many years of expert care. The branches, trunks and roots got their twisted look by maintaining the desired shape – using bamboo and wire – as the tree grew. And to achieve a particular shape, artists often grafted new branches onto existing ones. Some species even bore fruit, while others bloomed leaves and flowers. By the 14th century bonsai trees were considered a highly respected art form. Prized plants quickly made their way from monasteries to the king’s houses. Just like in China, trees have become symbols of status and honor.

In the early 1600s, Japanese bonsai evolved again. Skilled artists began to use special pruning techniques to remove all but essential parts of plants. This created a minimalist look, which reflects the Japanese philosophy and belief that “less is more”. In medieval times (1185 to 1603), bonsai became accessible to people of all social classes. The increased demand meant that more people had to learn the art of bonsai, and soon miniature trees were commonplace in almost every Japanese home.

Related Articles:

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Bonsai Master Masahiko Kimura Creates Gravity-Defying Mini-Forests

Artist Turns Wire Into Bonsai Trees That Will Live Forever

391-Year-Old Bonsai Survived Hiroshima Bombings and Still Growing

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Retired IPS officer complains about the theft of rare bonsai plant from his home https://rgbonsai.com/retired-ips-officer-complains-about-the-theft-of-rare-bonsai-plant-from-his-home/ Tue, 12 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/retired-ips-officer-complains-about-the-theft-of-rare-bonsai-plant-from-his-home/ The 15-year-old miniature tree was reportedly stolen from the home of retired DGP V Appa Rao A bonsai plant was reportedly stolen from the residence in Jubilee Hills of retired IPS agent V Appa Rao. Rao’s wife Sridevi has filed a complaint that among their vast collection of bonsai in their garden, a 15-year-old Saru […]]]>

The 15-year-old miniature tree was reportedly stolen from the home of retired DGP V Appa Rao

A bonsai plant was reportedly stolen from the residence in Jubilee Hills of retired IPS agent V Appa Rao. Rao’s wife Sridevi has filed a complaint that among their vast collection of bonsai in their garden, a 15-year-old Saru Casuarina bonsai was found missing by their gardener. The police filed an FIR under section 379 of the IPC and began to investigate the complaint.

The complaint filed by Rao’s wife V Sridevi says the bonsai tree that was placed near the southeast door of the house was there when their gardener, Devender, watered the plants three days ago, but was found missing when he searched for it. The bonsai is said to have disappeared on Sunday and the complaint was lodged with Jubilee Hills Police on Monday.

The residence has two CCTV cameras, but both have apparently not been functioning for several months now. The police are investigating the complaint by questioning residents of the neighborhood.

According to reports, another bonsai plant, a jade variety, was stolen from the same residence. Bonsai is a Japanese art of growing miniature trees in shallow trays and is usually expensive because it takes time and effort to grow into a well-formed tree. Saru Casuarina is a kind of Australian pine and is often used in bonsai making because of its sturdy stems and long, pointed foliage. The cost of bonsai often depends on its age and the quality of its form.

Appa Rao had served as a DGP in undivided Andhra Pradesh and had retired over 20 years ago.

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This Kumta Tree Maker Has Hundreds of Bonsai Beauties – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection. Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a […]]]>

Express press service

KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection.

Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a philosophy, of nature itself. Bonsai is the art of growing miniature trees in pots, where the plants take on the shape and scale of a full-sized tree. This art was developed by the Japanese. People, especially those who face a lack of space in their homes and cannot grow large trees like the banyan tree, have opted for bonsai trees which can be grown in small pots on their patios, outdoors. inside or outside their homes, or even on the stairs. These bonsai trees can be kept alive for over a hundred years. There are those that are over 1,000 years old in the world.

Lakshminarayana R Hegde, 62, the rangeland forest officer, retired from the forest service about four years ago. Before that, he had planned to spend his retirement life setting up a small bonsai garden in his home. And since then, he began to soak up information about growing bonsai in order to fulfill his dream.

After his retirement, he settled in his village of Kallabbe, located about 11 km from the town of Kumta, Uttara Kannada. Next to his house, on a small plot, he developed a bonsai garden named “Kubjavruksha Kalaniketana”. The garden has 36 types of more than 220 bonsai trees.

Hegde says many people dream of having their own garden or a plantation of tall trees near their house. Due to a space problem, they are forced to give up. “Therefore, I decided to use my knowledge of tree conservation that I acquired during my service as a forest officer and educate people on how to grow bonsai at home. Keeping green in and around the house is also good for people and nature,” he says.

He also leads workshops in schools and colleges on the different techniques. ), apart from the cultivation of medicinal and commercial plants. He suggests people grow bonsai according to their zodiac sign as it is widely believed that it will give them good health.

In his garden, the miniature trees have formal and informal shapes, vertical, inclined, etc. Some trees look like groves and others cascade. He gave his trees the shape of a heart, an animal, a human, Lord Ganesha, etc. Most of them are banyan trees. After collecting trees from various places, such as old buildings or forest areas, he cuts the roots and branches to shape them. Over a period of time, the bonsai grows in shape and attracts people. There is a huge market for these trees.
He believes bonsai cultivation is not just a science, it’s an art. “We have to provide water, fertilizer and follow the scientific growth of the trees. At the same time, you can shape trees, so it’s an art,” he says.

MAKING PANS
Hegde does not buy the necessary pots for growing bonsai. He makes his own pots using household items like a bucket, containers, and sometimes cement. He says he hardly invests in any hardware. Its pots vary in shapes like round, square, triangle, hexagon, a boat, etc. He says he must spend a lot of money if he had to buy such different shaped pots and carry them home.

BECOMING ORGANIC
Kallabbe is surrounded by forests in the Western Ghats. This is why Hegde collects the dry leaves and prepares organic fertilizers. He did not use any chemical fertilizers for the bonsai. He advocates organic fertilizers because they give lasting strength to any plant. He spends about 4 hours a day to make and maintain his garden.

HIS COLLECTION
Some bonsai garden trees Calotropis procera, Ficus religiosa, Achyranthes aspera, Ficus racemosa, Butea monosperma, Acacia catechu, Cynodon dactylon, Prosopis cenneraria, Imperata cylindrica

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How to train your bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-train-your-bonsai/ Fri, 29 Mar 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-train-your-bonsai/ Bonsai master Hal Sasaki. Photo by Theo Stroomer House Growing a bonsai tree isn’t as difficult as you think, says this Denver bonsai master. By Joe Lindsey March 29, 2019 Harold Sasaki wants to dispel some myths about bonsai: that they are difficult to grow, for example. “Most often a bonsai tree dies from lack […]]]>
Bonsai master Hal Sasaki. Photo by Theo Stroomer

House

Growing a bonsai tree isn’t as difficult as you think, says this Denver bonsai master.


Harold Sasaki wants to dispel some myths about bonsai: that they are difficult to grow, for example. “Most often a bonsai tree dies from lack of light,” he says. “So maybe you just put it in the wrong place.” Sasaki, who is 82 and goes by Hal, hears many such failure stories; he has several, especially since he started his teenage years in Hawaii. One of Denver’s most prominent bonsai masters, he has co-taught beginner’s bonsai classes ($105) at the Denver Botanical Garden for over 40 years, and also teaches and sells trees through his own business. , Colorado Bonsai ($150, one class smaller). His main goal: to make bonsai accessible, not intimidating.

Bonsai (say: bone-sai) is the ancient Japanese art of growing tiny trees in pots; the term bonsai literally means planted in a container. Contrary to popular belief, bonsai trees are not genetically dwarf varieties; they are of the same species as their full-sized brethren. Bonsai enthusiasts train or shape the trees – using techniques such as careful pruning or wiring the branches to grow in a certain way – into the shape of a life-size tree in miniature. The results can be amazing, with patient work. But they are surprisingly resilient plants, if you give them a fighting chance (a ficus bonsai in Italy is over 1,000 years old). The key, says Sasaki, is to treat them for what they are: trees, not ornaments.

“One of the big misconceptions about bonsai trees is that they grow differently from their natural large-leaved form,” says Sasaki. “So people put them on a low table, because it’s better there. They treat the plant like it’s made of silk and forget that it’s alive and growing and needs a certain amount of light. You have to make things grow where they have to grow.

(Learn more about Harold “Hal” Sasaki.)

Ideally, this means a sheltered but sunny location outdoors, at least in warm weather (in Colorado, bonsai cannot be left potted in the winter). But Sasaki knows that growing bonsai outdoors is impractical or impossible for many people, especially apartment and condo dwellers. So, for his practical lessons – students go home with a tree – he tries to select species that are more suitable for growing indoors all year round.

The smaller the leaf size, Sasaki says, the more light a bonsai tree needs. Ironically, this rules out many native pine and juniper species for most indoor environments. Sasaki’s must-have bonsai tree for beginners in Colorado? Portulacaria afra, aka Dwarf Jade, a succulent with thick leaves the size of a penny. “I use it to make students more likely to succeed,” he says. Dwarf Jade, native to South Africa, also tolerates the constant warm temperatures of indoor growing better than native conifers, which like cooler nights. These long-lived ficuses are another good choice for indoors.

Sasaki says he tries to give as much basic horticultural advice and care as possible in his classes, so students understand not just what to do, but why. To water, Sasaki fills a tray large enough for the entire pot, then submerges the plant past the edge of the pot and leaves it there until the air bubbles stop. This, he says, completely wets the root zone and he doesn’t water again until the plant is nearly dry.

Most importantly, if something isn’t working, he says, change it. Move the plant to a different location with more light. Or water less, not more. “People often say their tree died because they overwatered it,” he says. “And I say to them, ‘If you think you overwatered it, then why did you keep doing it’?”

What enabled Sasaki to teach for four decades? “I want other people to benefit from what I’ve had for all these years,” he says. “I try to make it as resilient as possible for them and demystify it. I want to tell people what joy you can get from these plants. The rewards are there to make your heart happy.

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Making the art of bonsai attractive to millennials https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”. But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old […]]]>

When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”.

But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old man who has been fascinated by bonsai since he was 18.

“Bonsai is the art of growing [a tree] in a container and miniaturizing it by pruning it to look like a mature tree growing in nature, ”Packard said. “Corn [the intention is to] also exude an artistic quality beyond what you would normally see in a natural, wild tree.

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Packard says the art of gardening is often seen as a hobby someone’s grandfather would do, or of particular interest to people who study and appreciate Asian culture. But he wants people to see small trees like him, where nature meets art.

“We don’t really need more bonsai practitioners, we need more bonsai enthusiasts,” he said. “I approach bonsai much more as an art than a craft and I try to instill in people an appreciation for these trees.”

Modern bonsai

His latest effort to make natural art more accessible to younger people was a six-month exhibition called Decked Out. He paired 16 of the museum’s bonsai trees with skateboards painted by local graffiti artists, including women and people of color.

“The idea was to replace the traditional Japanese scroll that we used in Japan to display it with our bonsai to create a theme, setting or location,” Packard said. “But instead of having that vertical artistic image depicted on a traditional roller, use a skateboard.”

Packard has been its curator for two years. So far, his efforts have paid off.

“We have had a 25% increase in our visits so far this year to date,” he said. “I certainly see a much wider range of visitors coming. A lot more tattoos are appearing in the collection which is a good thing.

Packard says bonsai arrived in the United States after World War II, when soldiers deployed to Japan returned to the United States with a new interest in Japanese culture. He thinks the key to engaging young people is to modernize the approach to the subject. After so many years of studying and practicing this traditional art form, he believes he has earned the right to interpret it through an American lens.

“I got to the point where, OK, I’ve been there, I’ve done this,” Packard said. “Now, what can we do that is different while still respecting this traditional aspect? We don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, so to speak. We still try to maintain this art form and still try to work within the framework of what bonsai is, but make it more relevant to me living in 2016 as a 35 year old American.

“So what does it look like?” ” he added. “Ultimately it’s going to be a bit of a step back, but there have been more people who are excited about this idea of ​​where we can take this historically traditional art form and make it a lot more unique. . “

Packard is already busy planning his next exhibit, and he’s reminding people that entry to the Pacific Bonsai Museum is free.

A Bonsai-Shore pine. His age is unknown. The Bridge is an oil painting on wood titled “Surroundings” by Tehya Sullivan. (Photo courtesy of the Pacific Bonsai Museum)

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Beautiful Bonsai: The Art of Making Big Small Things https://rgbonsai.com/beautiful-bonsai-the-art-of-making-big-small-things/ Tue, 02 Feb 2016 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/beautiful-bonsai-the-art-of-making-big-small-things/ ASHLEIGH MOINE / FAIRFAX NZ Passionate about bonsai, John Simpson works on one of his many bonsai trees. If you’ve always wanted to know how to grow a miniature maple or a small totara, look no further. Bonsai enthusiast John Simpson, along with bonsai specialists Rod Wegener and Ainsley Vincent, are starting a group for […]]]>
Passionate about bonsai, John Simpson works on one of his many bonsai trees.

ASHLEIGH MOINE / FAIRFAX NZ

Passionate about bonsai, John Simpson works on one of his many bonsai trees.

If you’ve always wanted to know how to grow a miniature maple or a small totara, look no further.

Bonsai enthusiast John Simpson, along with bonsai specialists Rod Wegener and Ainsley Vincent, are starting a group for those who want to learn the art of growing small trees.

John says his love for bonsai has grown over the past 18 years, and it takes some skill to take care of it.

One of John Simpson's many bonsai trees.  This one is a kowhai that bloomed after several years.

PROVIDED

One of John Simpson’s many bonsai trees. This one is a kowhai that bloomed after several years.

“I started very early but took a trip to Australia and the person who was supposed to water my trees didn’t really water them properly and most of them were dead when I got home. At this point , I gave up, but over the last 18 years I got back to it, “he says.

“The most important thing with bonsai is that people have bought a bonsai in the past, or someone bought a bonsai for them, and they say ‘it only lasts two or three weeks and then it ‘died. “The first thing I always ask is” where did you put it? “and everyone had put it on the fireplace or on the coffee table inside. Like any other tree, it you have to keep them out. “

He says a bonsai can be grown from almost any tree you love, from the large English oak to the delicate cherry blossom.

“It’s a great hobby, I wish I had started when I was a teenager because now is the time to start.

“I work on a lot of native trees. It’s not easy because quite often you get to a certain stage and it dies. I had a beautiful totara and I never did anything wrong and then, bang, it died like that. “

John, Rod and Ainsley’s group, called the Blenheim Bonsai Group, meets every second Sunday of the month, from around 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., at the Selmes Garden Center on Battys Rd.

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Bonsai – an overview and list of plants suitable for bonsai in the Indian climate https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-an-overview-and-list-of-plants-suitable-for-bonsai-in-the-indian-climate/ Fri, 18 Jun 2010 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-an-overview-and-list-of-plants-suitable-for-bonsai-in-the-indian-climate/ “Bonsai is actually two words, ‘Bon’ and ‘Sai’. The word ‘Bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘Sai’ means ‘growth’ or ‘plantation’. Therefore, the two words put together give you the translation of “tray culture” or “tray planting”. When you say the word “Bonsai” to people, they usually think of a type of tree. However, this art form […]]]>

“Bonsai is actually two words, ‘Bon’ and ‘Sai’. The word ‘Bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘Sai’ means ‘growth’ or ‘plantation’. Therefore, the two words put together give you the translation of “tray culture” or “tray planting”. When you say the word “Bonsai” to people, they usually think of a type of tree. However, this art form is actually a way to cultivate many different species of plants and trees – Erik Olsen, author of Bonsai Gardening Secrets

One theory about the beginning of bonsai is that its roots actually originated in India. Ancient Ayurvedic physicians returned from the Himalayas with medical tree saplings. By growing them in pots, cutting off their branches and cutting off the roots, they were able to preserve the trees in miniature form. Tulsi is a good example.

In the 12th century, bonsai was known as Vamanatanu Vrikshadi Vidya in India, which translates to the science of dwarf trees. The practice traveled to China and became known as pun-sai – the art of growing single specimen trees in pots. Various tree species have been grown with thick, gnarled trunks in pots. With its introduction to Japan, the art was further refined and took on a different form over time. Bonsai artists gradually introduced other materials like rocks and figurines, with additional and accent plants creating miniature landscapes in nature, known as sai-kei. Finally, in the middle of the 19th century, when Japan opened its doors to the rest of the world, bonsai reached Europe through exhibitions. After about a hundred years, this art returned to India in its present form. However, there are also other conflicting theories.

Banyan

People who grow bonsai for various reasons are different from people who are simply looking for an interesting plant and a treat is a centerpiece. The bonsai requires a lot of perseverance and must be maintained a lot. One thing to keep in mind is that bonsai is meant to be an outdoor plant, not an indoor plant, although since the 1990s it has increasingly become an item of interior decoration. Different types of plants are used for indoor bonsai trees as opposed to outdoors, so it is important to place the tree in the appropriate location.

Bonsai growers acquire these trees in different ways – either by using methods such as cutting, air layering and grafting from already existing trees, or by purchasing seeds for planting.

If you want to try your hand at bonsai, the first thing to do is get your hands on some great resources for soil, fertilizer, water, pots, and more.

Many people enjoy growing bonsai nowadays. There is something very mystical about them and they are very beautiful too. Bonsai cultivation is seen more as an art form and a skill that should be developed over time.

Trees for beginners

If you’re just starting out, it’s best to stick with certain tree types suitable for beginners and ideal for Indian conditions.

Starter Kits

Beginners can take a look at bonsai starter kits which contain a sapling, container, training wire, soil, rocks and instructions.

Bonsai pruning

To keep a bonsai nice and small, there are a few things you need to do. The first thing is to prune it. How you prune will depend on the individual tree and the shape you want.

Cut the roots

It is also necessary to prune the roots from time to time. This is because trees are naturally meant to be grown in the ground where there is plenty of room for the roots to spread. When growing a tree in a container, the roots can easily outgrow the container. So they will have to be pruned

Below is a list of plants suitable for the Indian climate:

BOTANICAL NAME FAMILY COMMON NAME
Ficus Bengalensis Moraceae vad
Ficus riligiosa Moraceae pipal
Ficus glomerulata Moraceae Umbar
ficus Carrica Moraceae Anjir
Mangifera indica Anacardiaceae Mango
Bouhinia Varigata Cesalpine Kanchan
Acacia Nilotica mimosa Babul
Prosopis Juliflora mimosa Vilayati Babul
Pithocolobium dulci mimosa Vilayati Tamarind
Tamarindus indica Cesalpine Vilayati Tamarind
Auracauria cuci Auraeauriaceae Christmas tree
Morus alba Moraceae Shahtout
Jacaranda mimosifolia mimosa Neel Mohor
Gravellia robusta Myrtaceae silver oak
Malphighia caccigera Malphighiaceae Malphighia
Citrus lemon Rutaceae Lime
auricular citrus Rutaceae Mosambi
Duranta varigata Verbenaceae Duranta
Bougainvillea Spectabilis Nyctaginaeae Bougainvell
petria volubilis Verbenaceae Petrie
species of bamboo Grasses Bamboo
Achrus Sapote Sapotaceae Chikoo
Mimosops eleing Sapotaceae Bakul
Eugenia Jamboliana Myrtaceae jambul
Feronia Elephantum Rutaceae Kavath
carrisa carrandus Apocynaceae Karvand
Pinus sylvestre Pinaceae Pine
Calistemon lanceolatus Myrtaceae Batlicha kuncha
Terminalia chabla Combretaceae Hirda
cassia siamia Caesalpinaceae red mohor
Cassia fistula Caesalpinaceae Amal heap
Board Delonix Cesalpines Gulmohor
Psidium guava Myrtaceae Guava
Butea Monosperma Butterflies Palas
Lagerostoimla sp Lethraceae pink pahadi
Lausonia inermis Lethraceae Mehndi
elastic ficus Moracrcées Rubber
Euphorbia nesifolia Euphorbiaceae Vajratundi
Exotic Muraa Rutaceae din ka raja
Nyctanthus arborticus Nyctanthaceae Parisat
Punica granatum Punicaceae Anaar
Casurina equisetifolia Casurinaceae Suru
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