bonsai art http://rgbonsai.com/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 07:57:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png bonsai art http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Step by step guide to growing bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/step-by-step-guide-to-growing-bonsai/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/step-by-step-guide-to-growing-bonsai/ A bonsai plant the the art of bonsai has been practiced for generations and is a highly symbolic religious activity, with its vital qualities of simplicity, harmony and balance reflected in many parts of Japanese culture and way of life. Bonsai art […]]]>







A bonsai plant





the the art of bonsai has been practiced for generations and is a highly symbolic religious activity, with its vital qualities of simplicity, harmony and balance reflected in many parts of Japanese culture and way of life. Bonsai art has been cultivated for over 2000 years and is inspired by the Chinese art of Penjing, which was transferred to Japan from China, and later carved and influenced by the minimalist Buddhist culture.

So, for those of you who want to grow bonsai at home, here are the steps to grow them:












Step 1

Choose a tree species that suits your climate. Not all bonsai are the same. Many woody perennials and even tropical plants can be made into bonsai,

However, not all species will be suitable for your specific environment. It is essential to consider the climate in which the tree will be grown when choosing a species. Some trees, for example, perish in cold temperatures, while others need sub-freezing temperatures to enter a dormant state and prepare for spring.

One of those trees you can start with if you are new to bonsai growing. These hardy evergreens can be found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and even in the more temperate sections of the Southern Hemisphere.

Additionally, junipers are simple to grow; they respond well to pruning and other “training” efforts and, as evergreens, never shed their leaves. However, they are growing at a snail’s pace.

Pines, spruces and cedars of various types are also often grown as bonsai. Another option is deciduous (hardwood) trees.

2nd step

Decide if you want to grow your bonsai indoors or outdoors.

  • Indoor trees receive less moisture and sunlight, so choose only those that need it the least. Here are some of the trees that will be perfect if you want to grow a bonsai indoors, Hawaiian Umbrella, Serissa, Gardenia, Camellia, Kingsville Boxwood, Ficus.












  • Outdoor plants are those that may require a higher amount of humidity and sun. listed are some of these species of plants, juniper, cypress, cedar, maple, birch, beech, ginkgo, larch, elm.

Step 3

Select the size of your bonsai

Select a tree based on the size you can manage, as bonsai trees come in a wide variety of sizes. Depending on the species, mature trees can measure from 6 inches (15.2 cm) to 3 feet (0.9 m). If you choose to grow your bonsai from a seedling or cutting from another tree, it will start out much smaller. Larger plants require more water, soil and sun, so make sure you have everything you need before you buy.

Step 4

Select the pot

Bonsai is not a species of tree. However, its main appeal is that the trees are grown in pots which limit their growth. The most crucial consideration in determining which pot to use is that the container be large enough to allow adequate soil to cover the plant’s roots.












When you water your tree, the liquid from the soil is absorbed by the roots. You don’t want to put little soil in the pot so the tree roots can’t retain moisture. To prevent root rot, make sure your pot has one or more drainage holes in the bottom. You can also drill them yourself if you have a drill.

  • While your container should be large enough to support your tree, you’ll also want to keep your bonsai nice and tidy. Excessively huge pots could overshadow the tree, creating an odd or mismatched look. Buy a container large enough to accommodate the tree’s roots, but not much larger – the goal is for the pot to aesthetically complement the tree while being relatively unobtrusive visually.

  • Some people choose to start their bonsai trees in basic, functional pots and then transfer them to more sophisticated containers once they are fully grown. This is especially handy if your bonsai species is delicate, as it allows you to put off buying the “right” container until your tree is healthy and beautiful.

Step 5

Prune your tree to the shape you desire to ensure it grows the way you want it to.

Step 6

Learn about trees, their life cycle, and how much moisture and sun they want

Step 7

Uproot trees and clean their roots

Brush away clumps of dirt blocking your view as you clean out the roots. This method benefits from the use of root rakes, chopsticks, tweezers, and other similar equipment.












Step 8

pot the tree

Place the tree the right way up in your new pot. Finish filling the container with fine, well-drained soil or growing medium, making sure to cover the root system of the tree. You can add a final layer of moss or gravel if desired.






]]>
The Secret Bonsai Philosophy https://rgbonsai.com/the-secret-bonsai-philosophy/ Mon, 06 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-secret-bonsai-philosophy/ In the 1383 nostyle game potted treesby Japanese poet Zaemi Motokiyo, a poor samurai offers to throw his last three bonsai trees on the fire to warm a traveling monk. That this small act struck contemporary audiences as profoundly noble testifies to the popularity of the art of bonsai cultivation – which Japan had adapted […]]]>

In the 1383 nostyle game potted treesby Japanese poet Zaemi Motokiyo, a poor samurai offers to throw his last three bonsai trees on the fire to warm a traveling monk. That this small act struck contemporary audiences as profoundly noble testifies to the popularity of the art of bonsai cultivation – which Japan had adapted from Chinese Zen Buddhists only 70 years ago – was beginning to gain in the country. .

Even then, bonsai were considered works of art. They were so valuable that people refused to part with them, even in times of financial crisis. Not only do bonsai trees serve as direct manifestations of the trends influencing Japanese aesthetics, but they also function as a means of putting into practice principles unique to Eastern thought. In other words, bonsai trees are as visually appealing as they are intellectually stimulating.

For reasons that will be explained in a moment, the term “bonsai” eventually spread beyond East Asia and entrenched itself in the vocabularies of Western societies. But while nearly every American is able to recognize a bonsai tree the moment we see one, few of us know the traditions and ideas that continue to inform how these iconic little plants are meant to be planted, grown, and cultivated. , potted and exposed.

More than carving trees

Simply put, bonsai is the art of manipulating the growth and appearance of small, young trees to make them look like older, larger trees. When Chinese Buddhists began teaching their traditions in Japanese monasteries, bonsai cultivation was a small but crucial component of a larger program: miniature gardening. Over time, Japanese students transformed this demanding practice into a discipline in its own right, one that emphasized perseverance and quiet contemplation.

Although species like junipers and pines are easier to work with due to their flexible nature, almost any type of plant can be made into bonsai as long as they receive the proper care. Growers work with saplings or plant their own seeds so they can closely monitor the growth of their trees. They analyze the unique characteristics of each bonsai, then choose to present it on a side that accentuates its strengths and hides its imperfections.

In order to give their bonsai trees a more aged look, growers carefully trim the foliage to bring out the shape of the hidden trunk below. Unnecessary or uninteresting branches are amputated, preferably with tools like a concave cutter to minimize scarring. Some may remove parts of the bark, bleaching the exposed sapwood with lime sulfur solutions. This gives the bonsai a weathered appearance, suggesting previous encounters with high winds and bright thunderstorms.

Wabi and sabi

While notions of what bonsai trees should look like vary from age to age, some preferences have remained relatively constant. In addition to having a deceptive appearance of maturity, a good bonsai should show no trace of human intervention; scar tissue must appear natural rather than man-made, while aluminum wires used to bend trunks or reposition branches must be removed or covered before the tree can be exposed.

Unlike Western art movements, symmetry should be avoided at all costs when growing a bonsai tree. Perfectly straight trunks should be bent or countered by cascading foliage in another direction. Branches with abnormally sharp angles should be cut or removed entirely. The most notable bonsai trees have always been asymmetrical in their design, but the arrangement of the branches still manages to impart an undeniable sense of harmony.

The rules that bonsai growers try to follow are not arbitrary but informed by the wisdom of two ancient worldviews. Chief among these influences were Zen Buddhism – a movement based on overcoming the meaninglessness inherent in existence through patience and self-control – and wabi-sabian elusive Japanese concept equally interested in accepting life’s many imperfections through silence, solitude and an unwavering appreciation of how the decaying hand of time affects the world around us.

Recall rather than represent

By growing a bonsai tree, you are essentially acting on ideas formulated by these intertwined branches of Eastern thought. Trees, unlike statues, are not inanimate organisms but living and breathing. A canvas may hold Rembrandt’s or Vermeer’s brushstrokes for hundreds of years, but bonsai trees are always on the move. They develop leaves in certain seasons and lose them in others. Their branches and roots keep twisting and turning, constantly undoing the work of its cultivator.

Saburo Kato, a bonsai master who formed one of the first international communities of growers in the 1980s, compared bonsai cultivation to raising children. This is basically a different way of saying that the art of bonsai is not about creating a flawless masterpiece. Rather, it is an endless and painstaking battle with the forces of nature. To win, practitioners must acquire the kind of perseverance and unconditional kindness normally reserved for devout monks.

Kyozo Murata, another bonsai master, perhaps put it best when he said that the purpose of bonsai trees is not necessarily to represent a thought but to remind us of a feeling: “Bonsai”, a- he said, “not only has a special plant’s natural beauty, but the appearance reminds people of something other than the plant itself. A person awakened to the essential mutability of life does not fear the decline physical or lonely; rather he accepts these facts with a quiet resignation and even finds in them a source of pleasure.

]]>
How to get started with the best bonsai trees for beginners https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-get-started-with-the-best-bonsai-trees-for-beginners/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-get-started-with-the-best-bonsai-trees-for-beginners/ Photo: TONG2519 (Shutterstock) When you hear the phrase “a bonsai” you are probably thinking of these tiny, ornate trees that people often keep as a kind of desktop ornament. But In fact, Bonsai is not a type of tree at all – the “B” wordonsai” refers to art form and horticultural method of growing miniature […]]]>

Image for article titled How to get started with bonsai trees without killing them

Photo: TONG2519 (Shutterstock)

When you hear the phrase “a bonsai” you are probably thinking of these tiny, ornate trees that people often keep as a kind of desktop ornament. But In fact, Bonsai is not a type of tree at all – the “B” wordonsai” refers to art form and horticultural method of growing miniature landscapes. The art of bonsai native China and evolved when Japan Shrunk the technique focus on miniature trees rather than whole trees gardens.

bonsai cultivation has become a trend which spread to the United States in the years following World War II and is now practiced in homes around the world. Cultivation method requires clarification carve and carve plant care to keep delicate trees alive and maintain their small structure. For novice growers, this process involves bit of a learning curve, but mental health benefits maybe deep. Here are three types of plants that help beginners master the art of bonsai.

What are the benefits of Bonsai gardening?

Bonsai trees are also known as the “tree of life”. They say take care of them reduce stresspromote concentration, and help relieve the symptoms of depression. Less concretely, some believe miniature trees lend a magical properties of the house and their care can bestow prosperity and good luck. It’s a surprisingly deep hobby that you can learn with low initial investment—just a plant and a pair of cubs the shears will get you started. (Of course, as with any other steptime, you can also pay a parcel silver in art.)

How to care for different types of bonsai

Magical thinking aside, tThe plants themselves require no unusually heavy care. Depending on the variety, ththey need very little light, which, coupled with their small size means you put them almost anywhere in your home. With proper attention, unique trees thrive as houseplants.

With all plants, some are more complicated than others. Because bonsai is an art form, different styles of plants require specific care. As a beginner, most of all you want the plant to live while you learn the ropes.

How to keep a ficus bonsai alive

The ficus bonsai is an upright style of tree with flat glossy green leaves. Although bonsai trees can survive in low light conditions, this should be placed near a bright area in your house where he can get at least a few moments of sunshine. Ficus are usually ttropical plants that are accustomed to a humid climate, but these resistant specimens only needs watering once a week, and enjoy from time to time light mist. Most bonsai require similar soil types including lava stone, pumice stone or organic soil. These soils provide good drainage and good moisture retention. Bonsai soil can be purchased at most garden stores and will cost anywhere between $9 and $15 or a bag (depending on type.)

Pruning requires cutting off old leaves after new growth has reached 7 to 10 cm. You will be want to cut the oldest, yellow leaves before they drop to make way for new growth and keep the plant’s miniature size and shape intact. A ficus will usually run you $20 for $60according to the seller and the initial Cut. Ficus are fairly self-sufficient and will remain quite small (varies with their pot size)making them perfect for the beginner still developing their bonsai skills.

How to Grow a Chinese Elm Bonsai

Chinese elm Bonsai has a unique shape, with a twisted trunk that grows straight and produces small dark green leaves. these slow-grow plants give the beginner planter plenty of time to try out his technique. Chinese elm trees like direct sunlight in the spring, but the summer sun is overwhelming, so kkeep them in a bright place area of ​​your home, but remember to shade them during the summer months. Watering is quite simple-tThey don’t require a lot of moisture, so overwatering could lead to root rot. the to place Bonsai Gardener advise: “Check it every few days, [and] water when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch.

Size is only necessary during the spring months, promote germination during the growing season and help the tree keep its small shape. The Chinese elm needs little wiring (the name of process used to shape bonsai trees); prunning alone will keep their shape. Since these trees are popular for their uniqueness look, they can be a bit more expensive, ranging from $35 to $100+. For less than $100, bbeginners can buy one starter kit with everything from pruning shears to fertilizer to start their travel.

How to take care for a jade bonsai

One of the easiest Bonsai to maintain is the variety of jade. Because jade trees are succulents, they require very little attention, but have an unusual and attractive look and feel. They grow upright and their small, fleshy green leaves grow along the stem. They can be treated as a succulent, requiring very little water but an excellent evacuation system. Water them around every 10 at 20 days. Unlike other varieties of bonsai, yYou will want to place them in a dry, warm location with plenty of sun to mimic the desert conditions in which they thrive.

Trimming a jade plant is fun because you can’t really go wrong. You can cut it down to its stems without killing it. Cut keeps the plant small, promotes new growth and thickens its trunk. Jade plants adapt easily to wiring, allowing you to shape the small plants in any direction, making their one of the most durable Bonsai for beginners.

Jade plants are not the cheapest variety of bonsai, but they are mmore affordable than Chinese elms. A jade Bonsai will cost you anywhere from $45 for $80depending on the size. You can practice pruning as you like, and if you forget to water them, it’s OK—they can easily be revived with a little the water.

]]>
6 types of bonsai that are best for beginners https://rgbonsai.com/6-types-of-bonsai-that-are-best-for-beginners/ Fri, 14 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/6-types-of-bonsai-that-are-best-for-beginners/ istockphoto.com Bonsai, a horticultural art originating in ancient China, is still a popular hobby today. A common misconception is that bonsai is a type of tree. In fact, bonsai refers to the craft or art of growing, shaping and caring for tiny trees. Like their full-sized siblings, bonsai trees can survive for hundreds of years. […]]]>

istockphoto.com

Bonsai, a horticultural art originating in ancient China, is still a popular hobby today. A common misconception is that bonsai is a type of tree. In fact, bonsai refers to the craft or art of growing, shaping and caring for tiny trees.

Like their full-sized siblings, bonsai trees can survive for hundreds of years. Some even outlived their keepers. A Japanese white pine from the collection of the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in Washington DC, for example, has been in formation since 1625, making it almost 400 years old.

Those looking to try their hand at bonsai should know that it takes time and patience to master the craft. With practice, however, it is possible to turn unwieldy saplings into works of art. The first step in this long and rewarding process is to choose the right tree, the one suitable for beginners. Here are the top contenders.

1. ficus

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

While most people associate bonsai trees with indoor displays, many varieties do better outdoors. This can make it difficult for those who live in colder climates to get into the hobby. Fortunately, some trees, for example the ficus, thrive in an indoor environment. The two varieties best suited to growing indoors are Ficus retusa and Ficus ginseng., both of which have visually interesting trunks. However, those living in USDA zones 10 and 11 can get away with growing most ficus species outdoors.

What makes ficuses so adaptable is their ability to respond positively to increasing restrictions. In bonsai, the selection of a small container is essential to limit the size of the plant. Because ficuses are happy in smaller containers, they are well suited for bonsai. They also forgive mistakes in watering and other types of care. Ficus plants, for example, are generally not afraid of the dry conditions of indoor environments. Just be sure to choose a sunny spot for your mini ficus.

2. Chinese Elm

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

This slow growing plant is perfect for bonsai beginners as it can keep content almost anywhere. Chinese elm trees do just as well indoors as they do outdoors and can survive outdoors in USDA zones 4 through 9. Just be sure to choose a spot with plenty of morning sun that gets shady l ‘afternoon.

Another reason this tree is ideal for bonsai art is that it is easy to prune and its slow growth makes shaping simple. The trees are also not very susceptible to pest infestations, with the exception of spider mites. But these little insects are usually easily controlled with a few applications of neem oil.

RELATED: 12 Stunning Dwarf Trees Perfect For Big Yards Or Small Yards

3. Juniper

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

This needle-leaved tree is very attractive in miniature form. It is important to note, however, that junipers do not do well indoors. Instead, grow these trees outdoors in USDA Zones 4 through 9. Place them in a location where they can receive at least 4 hours of sunlight per day. Unlike other less hardy, bonsai-friendly trees, junipers can handle the cold.

As with other beginner-friendly bonsai trees, junipers are resistant to pests. However, spider mites and corn borers sometimes target them. Prevent infestations with regular pruning to keep the leaves from getting too messy. Juniper is also perfect for bonsai beginners as it tolerates over-pruning well. Although aggressive pruning can weaken them and cause browning, trees will eventually recover from pruning errors.

4. Cotoneaster

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

These trees, small at first, lend themselves well to the art of bonsai. Native to three continents – Asia, Europe and Africa – cotoneasters feature glossy green leaves and small, apple-shaped fruits that appear after a bloom of small white flowers.

To grow cotoneasters, choose a spot with full sun, either indoors or outdoors. Provide frost protection for container plants, although cotoneasters planted in the ground should tolerate frost fairly well. Most varieties are cold hardy in zones 5 through 8, but hardiness varies by variety. Unlike more difficult bonsai species, these trees are drought tolerant as long as dry periods are short. Also, since the branches of cotoneasters are flexible, they support shaping well via wires.

RELATED: The Most Expensive Houseplants People Actually Buy

5. Portulacaria

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

Portulacaria trees, also known as dwarf jade or baby jade, are excellent beginner bonsai species because they don’t need regular watering. If you have a habit of killing plants with your poor watering habits, this might be the right tree for you to try bonsai growing methods. Just be careful not to over the wateras these trees are susceptible to root rot.

When shaping portulacarians, avoid wires and stick to a neat size. Because they grow quickly, regular pruning is necessary to maintain an aesthetic shape. You can keep baby jades outside during the summer, but ideally they should be brought in when nighttime lows reach 40 degrees. In zones 10 and 11, it is possible to grow baby jade outdoors, but the succulent is also perfect for indoor environments.

6. Rosemary

types of bonsai

istockphoto.com

Make edible art by choosing a rosemary plant for your bonsai hobby. Even better, when you prune your rosemary bonsai, you’re not only helping to maintain the shape of the plant, but you’re also cleaning up the herbs for dinner. Frequent watering is necessary for rosemary plants to thrive, but they are also vulnerable to root rot, so be sure to keep the plants in a pot with ample drainage.

To maintain the plant’s miniature size, remove new shoots that appear after the first set of leaves. Cutting off at least 25% of the roots will help prevent the plant from overgrowing its pot. You can shape the branches with wiring as long as they are young and flexible enough.

Another advantage of choosing rosemary as a small “tree” is that you can quickly start it from seed. Grow this herb in containers and bring it in before the first frost.

Other herbs suitable for growing bonsai include:

  • Thyme
  • Lavender
  • Oregano
  • bay laurel
]]>
Bonsai: a booming business https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-a-booming-business/ Sun, 29 Sep 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-a-booming-business/ From ficuses and fig trees to bougainvilleas and elms, the Bangladesh Bonsai Society hasn’t found a tree it can’t prune. The society, which this year completes more than two decades of existence, has grown from a handful of members in 1999 – its founding year – to more than 120 active members today. Each member […]]]>

From ficuses and fig trees to bougainvilleas and elms, the Bangladesh Bonsai Society hasn’t found a tree it can’t prune. The society, which this year completes more than two decades of existence, has grown from a handful of members in 1999 – its founding year – to more than 120 active members today.

Each member is an artist of their garden of evergreen plant varieties with spiky needles pruned and guided into traditional bonsai shapes. Some of the trees are their treasured “masterpieces”, almost half a century old.

Contrary to the common belief that bonsai is just a small world of plants, company president Nazma Shafique said it was about creating a certain look. “The bonsai specimen is supposed to look old in the pot. You have to achieve a sense of age in a tree.

She said the idea is “to keep pruning it down to reduce the size of the leaf. If you don’t follow them, a branch can have a long gap before it has a leaf, and it just doesn’t look good. The detail with which the members of the company work to create the best bonsai specimens is remarkable!

“Bonsai is an art. We work on a living plant, shaping and pruning it to give it an aesthetic appearance. We work like architects. It is also a science, because without knowledge of horticulture and botany, you cannot create a bonsai. And as we are completely immersed in the process, it also becomes a philosophy of life,” Nazma said.

In addition to company meetings and workshops, they regularly facilitate the exchange of ideas with other bonsai companies around the world. Nazma herself was introduced to this art form during one of the workshops she attended with Indian bonsai master Govind Raju in 1997.

Today, her garden is a cheerful picture of more than 40 bonsai trees, each with an artistic touch. Many members live in apartment complexes with beautiful balcony gardens showcasing their green fingers.

According to historical references, bonsai trees were brought from China to Japan as souvenirs in the 6th century. These trees came to adorn the homes of wealthy Japanese people and the “potted trees” became the symbol of Japan. Ironically, while bonsai is now considered an old man’s hobby in Japan, in Bangladesh it’s a thriving passion among plant enthusiasts in the capital, with some setting up their own for-profit businesses. .

home businesses

In the Bangladesh Bonsai Society, there are at least four members who have turned their passion into small home businesses. Anisul Haq, who also started bonsai as an extension of his gardening hobby, is doing a great business thanks to the growing interest in bonsai in the capital.

“I normally sell specimens that are two to three years old. Bonsai trees can give yields of up to Tk 1 lakh–Tk 2 lakh, sometimes even more. It all depends on the age of the specimen and the complexity of the root system, among other parameters,” he said.

For example, there are 1400-year-old bonsai trees in the Japanese royal palace which are kept as royal heirlooms. According to Borhan Hossain, a bonsai specialist and member of the company that also sells Bondai, landscape bonsai have seen good demand.

Borhan has a terrace garden in the Mohakhali DOHS area which has a wide range of landscape bonsai specimens. “So far, I’ve done it out of passion. With so many requests coming in, I’m now taking orders too,” he says.

Borhan said bonsai today is more or less like a DIY (do it yourself) project. One can start with basic gardening tools and saplings or cuttings, and learn the art on their own. “I also give lessons when a group of people send in a request,” he said.

“It takes a lot of dedication, perseverance, patience, passion and practice to make a beautiful work of art using a plant. For me, it’s a spiritual process, like meditation. I stay connected with each of my creations,” he said.

Exotic varieties

Adding exotic varieties to the bonsai collection is considered another level of progress for the bonsai artist. Australian ficus, ginseng and Brazilian rain tree are some of the species grown by these ardent city gardeners in their home gardens.

Shahzadi Sultana has the Chinese elm of which she is proud. With more than 30 varieties of bonsai in her terrace garden, Shahjadi said exotic plants need a little more attention.

Exotic bonsai species in his collection include flowering trees like Muria Exotica, Temple Tree, Pomegranate, Citrus varieties, Bottlebursh, Legostomia and Rudraksha.

“During the summers, these cannot withstand too high temperatures,” she explained.

Shahzadi said creating bonsai requires a lot of dedication and especially visualization. “The fact that you take a plant, visualize it as a large tree, and help it grow into a miniature tree, seeing the change every day while retaining its genetic characteristics, that’s what makes bonsai so innovative and unique,” she said. .

Since the necessary moisture content is essential, bonsai should be watered every day and need sun every three days, she added.

The plant is initially kept in a large pot until it reaches maturity. “Then we visualize the shape the tree would take and wire the branches using flexible copper wires. You have to keep changing the wiring until you get the shape you need, which takes a lot of skill,” she said.

The plant is then transferred to a shallow container where it grows for about six months before being moved to a shallow porcelain container. A bonsai must be repotted every one and a half years, she added.

Single-shoot monocotyledonous plants such as coconut, areca nut or palm cannot be made into bonsai. In Bangladesh, bonsai mainly belong to ficus species like peepal or banyan, Shahzadi said.

“Some people think that you restrict the natural growth of a tree, but the plant has the ability to adapt to a pot. So it’s definitely not unnatural or cruel,” Shahzadi said.

EA

]]>
Bonsai trees take centuries to grow and years of training https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-trees-take-centuries-to-grow-and-years-of-training/ Tue, 02 Jul 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-trees-take-centuries-to-grow-and-years-of-training/ Bonsai is the art of shrinking an ordinary tree to create a perfect miniature representation in a small pot. The craft originates from China and requires years of training and centuries of dedication. At the 2012 International Bonsai Convention, a tree was on sale for 100 million yen, or just under $ 1 million. Many […]]]>
  • Bonsai is the art of shrinking an ordinary tree to create a perfect miniature representation in a small pot.
  • The craft originates from China and requires years of training and centuries of dedication.
  • At the 2012 International Bonsai Convention, a tree was on sale for 100 million yen, or just under $ 1 million. Many more of these trees are considered to be totally priceless.
  • We spoke with a fourth generation bonsai master in central Japan to understand what makes these trees so expensive.
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

Bonsai is an art form that takes years of training and centuries of dedication. At the 2012 International Bonsai Convention, a tree was on sale for 100 million yen, or just under $ 1 million.

And many more of these trees are considered totally priceless. So what makes bonsai so expensive?

Bonsai is the art of shrinking an ordinary tree to create a perfect miniature representation of nature in a small pot. It has a long history. Originally from China, the practice of creating tiny trees and landscapes appeared as early as the 6th century.

Tree growth is limited by years of pruning, wiring, repotting, and grafting, and the plants need to be controlled and watered often every day. The skills required to grow these trees play a huge role in their value.

They are often bent and twisted, placed around rocks or even placed with other trees to simulate a small forest. Many of these techniques take years to master, and any mistake made can result in permanent ruin of the form or even death of a plant that has grown for centuries.

Chiako Yamamoto is a fourth generation bonsai master based in central Japan. She has been creating and selling bonsai for 51 years, and one of the hardest skills to master when growing these plants is patience.

The time and dedication this process requires is unlike almost any other form of work of art. While the work is almost a form of sculpture, the plants are living things and will always react in their own way.

The extraordinary amount of time this process takes means there just aren’t many trees around. Some of the most valuable bonsai are over 800 years old, so the supply isn’t going to increase anytime soon.

Other factors can contribute to the cost. Bonsai pots and the tools used are often handmade and can cost thousands of dollars themselves.

Certain types of trees are also more difficult to grow or require certain techniques and may fetch a higher price. But, more than anything, these trees are works of art valued for their beauty and the artist’s vision.

]]>
This Kumta Tree Maker Has Hundreds of Bonsai Beauties – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection. Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a […]]]>

Express press service

KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection.

Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a philosophy, of nature itself. Bonsai is the art of growing miniature trees in pots, where the plants take on the shape and scale of a full-sized tree. This art was developed by the Japanese. People, especially those who face a lack of space in their homes and cannot grow large trees like the banyan tree, have opted for bonsai trees which can be grown in small pots on their patios, outdoors. inside or outside their homes, or even on the stairs. These bonsai trees can be kept alive for over a hundred years. There are those that are over 1,000 years old in the world.

Lakshminarayana R Hegde, 62, the rangeland forest officer, retired from the forest service about four years ago. Before that, he had planned to spend his retirement life setting up a small bonsai garden in his home. And since then, he began to soak up information about growing bonsai in order to fulfill his dream.

After his retirement, he settled in his village of Kallabbe, located about 11 km from the town of Kumta, Uttara Kannada. Next to his house, on a small plot, he developed a bonsai garden named “Kubjavruksha Kalaniketana”. The garden has 36 types of more than 220 bonsai trees.

Hegde says many people dream of having their own garden or a plantation of tall trees near their house. Due to a space problem, they are forced to give up. “Therefore, I decided to use my knowledge of tree conservation that I acquired during my service as a forest officer and educate people on how to grow bonsai at home. Keeping green in and around the house is also good for people and nature,” he says.

He also leads workshops in schools and colleges on the different techniques. ), apart from the cultivation of medicinal and commercial plants. He suggests people grow bonsai according to their zodiac sign as it is widely believed that it will give them good health.

In his garden, the miniature trees have formal and informal shapes, vertical, inclined, etc. Some trees look like groves and others cascade. He gave his trees the shape of a heart, an animal, a human, Lord Ganesha, etc. Most of them are banyan trees. After collecting trees from various places, such as old buildings or forest areas, he cuts the roots and branches to shape them. Over a period of time, the bonsai grows in shape and attracts people. There is a huge market for these trees.
He believes bonsai cultivation is not just a science, it’s an art. “We have to provide water, fertilizer and follow the scientific growth of the trees. At the same time, you can shape trees, so it’s an art,” he says.

MAKING PANS
Hegde does not buy the necessary pots for growing bonsai. He makes his own pots using household items like a bucket, containers, and sometimes cement. He says he hardly invests in any hardware. Its pots vary in shapes like round, square, triangle, hexagon, a boat, etc. He says he must spend a lot of money if he had to buy such different shaped pots and carry them home.

BECOMING ORGANIC
Kallabbe is surrounded by forests in the Western Ghats. This is why Hegde collects the dry leaves and prepares organic fertilizers. He did not use any chemical fertilizers for the bonsai. He advocates organic fertilizers because they give lasting strength to any plant. He spends about 4 hours a day to make and maintain his garden.

HIS COLLECTION
Some bonsai garden trees Calotropis procera, Ficus religiosa, Achyranthes aspera, Ficus racemosa, Butea monosperma, Acacia catechu, Cynodon dactylon, Prosopis cenneraria, Imperata cylindrica

]]>
Bonsai Tips From an Atlanta Master https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-tips-from-an-atlanta-master/ Thu, 08 Feb 2018 06:16:14 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-tips-from-an-atlanta-master/ Photography by iStockphoto.com Translated from Japanese, bonsai simply means a tree in a pot. However, the techniques used to grow such a plant are a bit more complex. “Bonsai is the art of making a tree look older,” says Rodney Clemons, nationally respected bonsai master and teacher at Stone Mountain. Each planting tells nature’s story […]]]>
Photography by iStockphoto.com

Translated from Japanese, bonsai simply means a tree in a pot. However, the techniques used to grow such a plant are a bit more complex. “Bonsai is the art of making a tree look older,” says Rodney Clemons, nationally respected bonsai master and teacher at Stone Mountain. Each planting tells nature’s story in miniature, evoking living oak trees twisted by ocean winds or maple trees reaching skyward through snowdrifts.

Tropical varieties are best suited indoors, but native species are often easier to grow, Clemons notes. Evergreens are the most conventional, but deciduous trees make great bonsai trees, especially when their leaves change color in the fall.

Smith-Gilbert Gardens in Kennesaw, a 16-acre public botanical garden, features one of the region’s best bonsai collections, renovated this year. (Clemons manages both Smith-Gilbert and a garden at the Monastery of the Holy Spirit in Conyers.)

Although big box retailers may sell bonsai (aka “con-sai”), Clemons recommends purchasing plants from specialty nurseries such as Monastery of the Holy Spirit, Full Moon Bonsai in Marietta, Plant City Bonsai in Clermont or Allgood Bonsai from Clemons. at Stone Mountain.

You can find small bonsai trees for as low as $25, but Clemons says beginners should opt for more established trees 12 to 18 inches tall (usually $75 to $125). Ficus and juniper are two varieties that are relatively easy to grow, he says.

Bonsai is 80 to 90 percent horticulture, and the rest is art and technique, Clemons says. The practice teaches how plants feed, grow and respond to climate.

Contrary to popular belief, bonsai trees are not always dwarf specimens. They are often regular species trained to produce small leaves by techniques such as manual defoliation and timely pruning of branches and roots. Many trees and shrubs can be trained, even magnolias, oaks and azaleas. Amazingly, tiny fruit trees will produce full-sized flowers and fruit: a 12-inch-tall apple tree will produce full-sized apples.

To be involved: Atlanta Bonsai Society has flourished since 1963 and offers many opportunities for bonsai studies, performances and workshops. Find the company at JapanFest at the Gwinnett Center on September 19-20.

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2015 issue of HOUSE of Atlanta Magazine.

]]>
Growing Cannabis Bonsai: Separating Fact from Fiction https://rgbonsai.com/growing-cannabis-bonsai-separating-fact-from-fiction/ Wed, 28 Jun 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/growing-cannabis-bonsai-separating-fact-from-fiction/ Imagine having a miniature cannabis plant that you could simply put in your window, with pretty green branches emerging from its artistically spiraling center. Sounds pretty amazing, right? It’s the cannabis bonsai dream, an idea that has gained popularity in recent years and continues to be a hot topic. A quick Google search will bring […]]]>

Imagine having a miniature cannabis plant that you could simply put in your window, with pretty green branches emerging from its artistically spiraling center. Sounds pretty amazing, right? It’s the cannabis bonsai dream, an idea that has gained popularity in recent years and continues to be a hot topic.

A quick Google search will bring up many articles claiming how easy it is to grow a cannabis bonsai, along with guides or step-by-step instructions. However, most come with hard-to-believe photos or renderings of said bonsai tree. Do these projects actually work?

Want to know more about growing cannabis? Check out Leafly’s grow guide for tips and advice from expert growers.

To get to the bottom of this intriguing topic, I consulted the minds of those who have experience with bonsai and cannabis. My main question: Is it even possible to grow a cannabis bonsai?

What is bonsai, and why would cannabis growers like it?

The key to bonsai is the word “miniature”. Unlike other potted plants, the joy of bonsai is in creating a small landscape that is meant to be a replica of the natural world. The bonsai has a long and rich history which originates from parts of China and Japan and may have started as early as 700 AD.

Also, just as “miniature” is key to bonsai, so too is the “art form”. It’s not a houseplant that you can put in a pot and let grow willy-nilly – bonsai trees are artistic endeavors that take time and care to cultivate. Many bonsai trees are even passed down from generation to generation, long surviving those who first gave loving attention to their branches.

Laurel Cleveland saw such bonsai at Pacific Bonsai Museum in Washington State, home to Hiroshima bonsai, as well as many others. Cleveland is the creative director of Washington’s Vela, a cannabis dispensary that shares space with a cannabis culture. This convenience allows him to witness the evolution of plants on a daily basis. Along with growing her own cannabis plants in the past and having a wealth of experience in horticulture, the aptly named Laurel has also developed a keen love for growing bonsai.

When it comes to bonsai and cannabis plants, there’s one thing she believes is important to both: a healthy respect for the plant. “I think it’s a really good way for people to start exploring [what it takes to grow] cannabis,” she says of the labor-intensive practice of growing bonsai. “If bonsai is something they already know, more than just putting something on their porch…cannabis requires a lot more care and dedication, as does bonsai, and I think that’s exactly what he deserves.”

Unfortunately, due to home growing laws in Washington, Cleveland is unable to experiment with growing its own cannabis bonsai. Still, the topic has certainly been popular lately, which Cleveland has noticed. So why this sudden resurgence of interest?

“Honestly, people want to feed and take care of something, and sometimes animals aren’t the best fit for younger generations because they work a lot and can’t necessarily give people the love and attention they need. animals. So they redirect that to the plants,” says Cleveland.

Many cannabis growers would like to see a bonsai version in their usual yield, but is that possible or just a pipe dream?

The possibilities of cannabis and bonsai

Scott Chadd is 73 years old, retired and has been growing bonsai for more than half his life. It has been an eponymous “bonsai” for 45 years. He lives in California where he owns the Lotus Bonsai Nursery and president of the Golden State Bonsai Federation.

Chadd was happy to discuss the topic of cannabis bonsai, but his perspective came with a healthy dose of skepticism.

“Not all plants are suitable for bonsai,” he says. “It is quite complex to cover the reasons, but I will list a few. The leaves cannot be large in relation to the trunk and the branch or the stem of the plant. It should have a trunk that tapers from large at the bottom to small at the top. It should have trunk movement and interesting bark. Like all visual art, we mainly deal with line, shape, texture and color. The bonsai must have visual interest, be able to hold the eye of the viewer, and be vigorous enough to withstand the rigors of bonsai cultivation.

With that in mind, does he think there could be a place for cannabis in the bonsai world? “I don’t believe cannabis produces acceptable bonsai trees,” says Chadd.

“It is a very fast growing, fastigiated shrub with large leaves relative to the size of the trunk and stem. It is angular, not graceful, or exhibiting curves or movement. As for its dimensions, we normally seek to have a bonsai where the tree is six times larger than the diameter of the trunk at the ground line. It does not have a long lifespan and does not have any special characteristics other than the cannabinoid effect on human psychic activity.

Cleveland, for its part, also foresees challenges for the aspiring cannabis bonsai cultivator.

“I think it would be a huge challenge, definitely. I think it would probably depend on the life cycle, depending on the genetics of the plant. I’ve seen cannabis plants from growers with roots like no other, so I think as far as roots go, they have the ability to ground themselves very well. Although the amount of space in the pot can be a huge factor, it’s such a vigorous plant that I feel like it’s able to grow just about anywhere. The amount of attention and care you would need to give him would be difficult.

That said, Cleveland allows it, “if you have the time to experiment, I think it would be worth a try.” She doesn’t see as many pitfalls as Chadd: for example, the rapid growth of cannabis is seen as an advantage in her mind, rather than a downfall of the plant.

“I think people who know bonsai will have a little less of a learning curve,” she says. “If you lose a bonsai, it’s heartbreaking, because it takes years and years to grow it. Cannabis grows faster, so because cannabis is so vigorous and hearty, you can see the changes happen faster and learn more about the plant.

Caring for a cannabis bonsai

As for the classic form of bonsai? Well, maybe there is some hope. Cleveland believes that with low-stress training and ample time and space, a cannabis plant could grow into the shape a grower desires. His theory is credited by YouTuber Andre Pyrah. Based in Amsterdam, Pyrah experimented on her channel with growing cannabis and managed to train some plants to twist and bend in shapes reminiscent of traditional bonsai.

Will we see more growers trying cannabis bonsai? Cleveland thinks it’s just a matter of time. “I think it’s just a matter of experimentation, and lots of failures,” she says, “but that’s with anything, right? Growing a warehouse full of cannabis is also a difficult task, so anything is possible.

What about flowering? Could a real cannabis bonsai produce a smokable product? The answer to this may lie in the flowering cycles of other bonsai trees. While bonsai trees may be allowed to enter a flowering life cycle, many growers report that many of these trees do not return after flowering (depending on strain and genetics). So, it remains to be seen if a flowering cannabis bonsai would come back with the same vigor it had before, or even survive.

Ultimately, the art of bonsai is perhaps less about what the tree can do for you, and more about what you can do for the tree. The cultivation of bonsai is a task that requires the artist to show precision, care and attention to the tree. The reward lies in the beauty of creation, the joy of seeing a landscape of the world in miniature form, and the knowledge you have nurtured from this. If there’s one thing bonsai and cannabis growers share, it’s a deep passion for their plants. With time and dedication, chances are we will eventually see the two passions merged into one.

Raeland

Rae Lland is a freelance writer, journalist and former editor of Weedist and The Leaf Online. With a focus on culture, music, health and wellness, in addition to her work for Leafly, she has also been featured in numerous online cannabis publications as well as print editions of the magazine. Cannabis Now. Follow her on Instagram @rae.lland

See articles by Rae Lland

]]>
Making the art of bonsai attractive to millennials https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”. But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old […]]]>

When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”.

But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old man who has been fascinated by bonsai since he was 18.

“Bonsai is the art of growing [a tree] in a container and miniaturizing it by pruning it to look like a mature tree growing in nature, ”Packard said. “Corn [the intention is to] also exude an artistic quality beyond what you would normally see in a natural, wild tree.

New Girls’ Magazine Focuses on Brain, Not Beauty

Packard says the art of gardening is often seen as a hobby someone’s grandfather would do, or of particular interest to people who study and appreciate Asian culture. But he wants people to see small trees like him, where nature meets art.

“We don’t really need more bonsai practitioners, we need more bonsai enthusiasts,” he said. “I approach bonsai much more as an art than a craft and I try to instill in people an appreciation for these trees.”

Modern bonsai

His latest effort to make natural art more accessible to younger people was a six-month exhibition called Decked Out. He paired 16 of the museum’s bonsai trees with skateboards painted by local graffiti artists, including women and people of color.

“The idea was to replace the traditional Japanese scroll that we used in Japan to display it with our bonsai to create a theme, setting or location,” Packard said. “But instead of having that vertical artistic image depicted on a traditional roller, use a skateboard.”

Packard has been its curator for two years. So far, his efforts have paid off.

“We have had a 25% increase in our visits so far this year to date,” he said. “I certainly see a much wider range of visitors coming. A lot more tattoos are appearing in the collection which is a good thing.

Packard says bonsai arrived in the United States after World War II, when soldiers deployed to Japan returned to the United States with a new interest in Japanese culture. He thinks the key to engaging young people is to modernize the approach to the subject. After so many years of studying and practicing this traditional art form, he believes he has earned the right to interpret it through an American lens.

“I got to the point where, OK, I’ve been there, I’ve done this,” Packard said. “Now, what can we do that is different while still respecting this traditional aspect? We don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, so to speak. We still try to maintain this art form and still try to work within the framework of what bonsai is, but make it more relevant to me living in 2016 as a 35 year old American.

“So what does it look like?” ” he added. “Ultimately it’s going to be a bit of a step back, but there have been more people who are excited about this idea of ​​where we can take this historically traditional art form and make it a lot more unique. . “

Packard is already busy planning his next exhibit, and he’s reminding people that entry to the Pacific Bonsai Museum is free.

A Bonsai-Shore pine. His age is unknown. The Bridge is an oil painting on wood titled “Surroundings” by Tehya Sullivan. (Photo courtesy of the Pacific Bonsai Museum)

]]>