bonsai bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 21:35:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png bonsai bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Bonsai: Market 2022 Business Statistics Focus Report Growth by Major Key Players https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-market-2022-business-statistics-focus-report-growth-by-major-key-players/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 09:31:12 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-market-2022-business-statistics-focus-report-growth-by-major-key-players/ Bonsai Market 2021 this report is included with the Analysis of the impact of the COVID19 epidemic key points influencing market growth. Also, Bonsai Market (By Major Key Players, By Types, By Applications and Major Regions) Segments Outlook, Business Assessment, Competition Scenario, Trends and Forecast through the coming year. The study of the Bonsai report […]]]>

Bonsai Market 2021 this report is included with the Analysis of the impact of the COVID19 epidemic key points influencing market growth. Also, Bonsai Market (By Major Key Players, By Types, By Applications and Major Regions) Segments Outlook, Business Assessment, Competition Scenario, Trends and Forecast through the coming year. The study of the Bonsai report is done on the basis of important research methodology which provides an analytical inspection of the global market based on various segments in which the industry is also alienated in the summary and advanced size of the market owing to the various outlook possibilities. The report also gives 360 degree overview of the competitive landscape of industries. SWOT analysis was used to understand the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in front of the shops. Thus, helping businesses understand the threats and challenges facing businesses. The bonsai market shows steady growth and CAGR is expected to improve over the forecast period.

This free sample report includes:
  1. A Brief Introduction to Bonsai Market Research Report.
  2. Graphical introduction of the regional analysis.
  3. The top Bonsai market players with their revenue analysis.
  4. Selected illustrations of bonsai market ideas and trends.
  5. Sample Bonsai Market report pages.


investigation

The main players in the bonsai market.

Bonsai Design, Inc.
Bonsai Network Japan
bonsai new zealand
Bonsai Ltd.
bonsai outing
Loder Bonsai BV
Fern Valley Bonsai

Bonsai Market Key Business Segmentation

On the basis of types, the bonsai market from 2015 to 2025 is primarily split into:
stump bonsai
landscape bonsai
Others

based on applications, the Bonsai market from 2015 to 2025 covers:
wholesale bonsai
custom bonsai

Some of the key factors contributing to the Bonsai market growth include:

  • Increase in per capita disposable income
  • Youth friendly Demographics
  • Technological advancement

In terms of the impact of COVID 19, the bonsai market report also includes the following data points:

  • Impact on Bonsai market size
  • End-User Trend, Preferences, and Budget Impact of the Bonsai Market
  • Regulatory Framework/Government Policies
  • Key players’ strategy to tackle the negative impact of the Bonsai market
  • New bonsai market window of opportunity

Regional Bonsai Market Analysis:

It could be divided into two different sections: one for regional production analysis and the other for regional consumption analysis. Here, analysts share gross margin, price, revenue, production, CAGR, and other factors that indicate growth for all regional markets studied in the report. covering North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa.

Key Question Answered in Bonsai Market Report.

  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the Bonsai Market?
  • What are the different marketing and distribution channels?
  • What is the current CAGR of the Bonsai Market?
  • What are the Bonsai market opportunities ahead of the market?
  • Who are the most prominent competitors in the Bonsai market?
  • What are the main results of SWOT and Porter’s Five Techniques?
  • What is the Bonsai market size and its growth rate during the forecast period?

Buy the FULL report now! https://www.qurateresearch.com/report/buy/EnP/2020-2025-global-bonsai-market/QBI-MR-EnP-1060535

A free data report (in the form of an Excel data sheet) will also be provided upon request with a new purchase.

Main points of the table of contents:

There are 13 Chapters to introduce Bonsai market in detail. This report included the analysis of market overview, market characteristics, industry chain, competition landscape, historical and future data by types, applications and regions.

  • Chapter 1: Bonsai market overview, product overview, market segmentation, regions market overview, market dynamics, limitations, opportunities, and industry news and policies.
  • Chapter 2: Bonsai industry chain analysis, upstream raw material suppliers, major players, production process analysis, cost analysis, market channels and major downstream buyers.
  • Chapter 3: Value analysis, production, growth rate and price analysis by type of bonsai.
  • Chapter 4: Downstream characteristics, consumption and market share by application of Bonsai.
  • Chapter 5: Production volume, price, gross margin and revenue ($) of bonsai by regions.
  • Chapter 6: Production, consumption, export and import of bonsai by regions.
  • Chapter 7: Bonsai Market Status and SWOT Analysis by Regions.
  • Chapter 8: Competitive landscape, product introduction, company profiles, market distribution status by Bonsai players.
  • Chapter 9: Bonsai Market Analysis and Forecast by Type and Application.
  • Chapter 10: Bonsai Market Analysis and Forecast by Regions.
  • Chapter 11: Bonsai industry characteristics, key factors, new entrants SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis.
  • Chapter 12: Bonsai Market Conclusion of the whole report.
  • Chapter 13: Appendix such as Bonsai Market Research methodology and data resources.

(*If you have special requirements, please let us know and we will offer you the report you want.)

Note – In order to provide more accurate market forecasts, all our reports will be updated prior to delivery considering the impact of COVID-19.

Contact us:
The Web: www.qurateresearch.com
E-mail: [email protected]
Telephone: USA – +13393375221, IN – +919881074592

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The Bonsai Supply launches two bonsai soil mixes for contemporary practitioners https://rgbonsai.com/the-bonsai-supply-launches-two-bonsai-soil-mixes-for-contemporary-practitioners/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 18:16:25 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-bonsai-supply-launches-two-bonsai-soil-mixes-for-contemporary-practitioners/ The company’s soil mixes are carefully mixed to create the best soil environment for bonsai trees to thrive. One of the most crucial aspects of growing bonsai trees is using the right soil mix. One cannot simply plant a bonsai in ordinary garden soil and expect it to flower. Bonsai soil requirements are specific and […]]]>

The company’s soil mixes are carefully mixed to create the best soil environment for bonsai trees to thrive.

One of the most crucial aspects of growing bonsai trees is using the right soil mix. One cannot simply plant a bonsai in ordinary garden soil and expect it to flower. Bonsai soil requirements are specific and often exacting. Florida-based retail store The Bonsai Supply is rising to the challenge with its soil mixes, making it easier for contemporary practitioners to find a suitable soil mix for their bonsai.

Bonsai Supply offers two soil mixes – Universal Soil Mix and Shohin Bonsai Soil Mix.

The Universal Soil Mix is ​​the best seller in the store. It is carefully blended by The Bonsai Supply’s in-house experts to provide the optimal bonsai growing environment. As the name suggests, Universal Soil Mix works well for a wide range of bonsai trees and is widely accepted by bonsai professionals across the country.

The store’s Shohin Bonsai Soil, on the other hand, is more specific. It is specially designed for Shohin bonsai or trees under eight inches tall. This is also carefully optimized for healthy bonsai growth, similar to the Universal Soil Mix.

The best bonsai soil mixes meet three important criteria: good drainage, good aeration and good water retention. Specifically, the soil should hold moisture without drowning the plant. Without these qualities, the bonsai will suffer root rot and eventually die.

Bonsai Supply’s soil mixes allow for daily watering without worrying about overwatering, even during the rainy season. Additionally, both use soil aggregates like pumice, lava, burnt clay, and pine bark, which are excellent for aeration, acidity, water drainage, and soil retention. absorption of nutrients. All aggregates are sustainably sourced in the USA and meticulously quality controlled.

Bonsai Supply’s Universal Bonsai Soil and Shohin Bonsai Soil are available for purchase on several major e-commerce marketplaces, including Amazon, Etsy, and eBay.

Find more information about Bonsai Supply’s soil mix and bonsai essentials here: https://thebonsaisupply.com.

About Bonsai Sourcing

The Bonsai Supply is a Florida-based retail store run by husband and wife duo Jerome and Mari Kellerhals. It was created in 2016 to address the severe lack of bonsai supplies in the region. Today, The Bonsai Supply offers a wide variety of high quality and affordable bonsai soil mixes, trees and accessories to customers around the world. It also offers educational workshops and several bonsai resources to help more people learn about the craft.

Media Contact
Company Name: bonsai supply
E-mail: Send an email
Country: United States
Website: https://thebonsaisupply.com/

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This Shop Brings the Art of Japanese Bonsai to Vancouver https://rgbonsai.com/this-shop-brings-the-art-of-japanese-bonsai-to-vancouver/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-shop-brings-the-art-of-japanese-bonsai-to-vancouver/ Made in Vancouver is a collaboration between Vancity and Daily Hive. Together, we shine the spotlight on local businesses, organizations and individuals who are helping to create a healthy local economy. Best Coast Bonsai is a Vancouver-based bonsai shop specializing in Japanese style plant arrangements and bonsai. As part of our Made in Vancouver series […]]]>

Made in Vancouver is a collaboration between Vancity and Daily Hive. Together, we shine the spotlight on local businesses, organizations and individuals who are helping to create a healthy local economy.


Best Coast Bonsai is a Vancouver-based bonsai shop specializing in Japanese style plant arrangements and bonsai.

As part of our Made in Vancouver series highlighting local businesses, we spoke to Tom Uleckithe owner and artist behind Best Coast Bonsai about this beautiful plant art form.

Through September 30, Vancity enviro™ Visa* cardholders will earn 1.5 times the rewards points at select businesses through the Load on Local program. To learn more, visit vancity.com/local

Operating out of East Van, Tom Ulecki creates high quality bonsai and kusamono master pieces based on techniques he learned while apprenticed in Osaka, Japan. The west coast of Canada is an ideal place for bonsai trees to grow and thrive. After returning to Vancouver, Tom launched Best Coast Bonsai. With bonsai and kusamono arrangements, the boutique offers consultation, styling and tree rental services.

“There are very few people who have been able to learn in Japan on the same scale as me. It was a rare learning opportunity, and I hope I can bring my knowledge of the art of bonsai to Vancouver The bonsai and kusamono developed by Best Coast Bonsai are of very high quality,” said Tom Ulecki in an interview with Daily Hive.

Kusamono plant arrangements are based on Japanese techniques. Each plant features a unique blend of Pacific Northwest flora like ferns, mosses and other varieties. these local, natural and reusable plant centerpieces have become a popular decor for weddings, events and instead bouquets of fresh flowers.

‘Kusamono actually gets more interesting over time. As they age, they develop more character and personality. It is durable because kusamono is reusable and it reflects the natural beauty that surrounds us. Bonsai allows us to get in touch with nature even in our urban environment.’

Tom has always had a passion for the environment, the arts and plants. He is also a visual artist under the pseudonym notanautomatom. Her strong background in painting has helped develop her dedication to the design aspects and fine detail of bonsai and plant arrangements.

“I hope my passion can transfer into my larger goal of trying to protect our natural environment. There are very few people who get into bonsai without caring about the environment and the challenges that society faces. is about to face.

Although this is a new venture that has faced many challenges due to the pandemic, the return of weddings and events creates a busy season ahead for Best Coast Bonsai.

“It’s rewarding to see the plants at the event and how unique they are. Seeing people experience the product and really enjoy it makes the hard work worth it. »

To learn more about Best Coast Bonsai, visit their website and Instagram

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A beginner’s guide to bonsai care https://rgbonsai.com/a-beginners-guide-to-bonsai-care/ Fri, 26 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/a-beginners-guide-to-bonsai-care/ When Queensland went into lockdown last year, Lawson Dibb didn’t bake bread or start making TikTok videos – he got into bonsai. “I turned 30 and thought…it would be pretty cool if I had kids in the next 10 years to say, ‘Hey, I’ve had this tree for 10 years. Here’s a picture of it […]]]>

When Queensland went into lockdown last year, Lawson Dibb didn’t bake bread or start making TikTok videos – he got into bonsai.

“I turned 30 and thought…it would be pretty cool if I had kids in the next 10 years to say, ‘Hey, I’ve had this tree for 10 years. Here’s a picture of it when I first got it, compared to now.'”

Now the Gold Coast local has nine trees, having started with just one from his local nursery. He encourages others to take up the hobby.

“I thought I could never have bonsai because it’s so difficult. But here I am, learning little by little and loving it.”

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What is Bonsai?

Bonsai is not just another type of potted plant.

As Bonsai enthusiast Austen Kosasih explains, it is an “art form that involves maintaining a living, miniature-sized tree within the confinement of a pot.”

Mr. Kosasih did a bonsai apprenticeship in Japan with a bonsai master, where “some trees were 1,200 years old and had been passed down from one generation to the next.”

How to start

Mr Kosasih says your first step should be to visit a local tree nursery to “see what kind of trees you gravitate towards”.

You can ask the nursery staff for advice on what type of tree is right for your location and budget, as well as tips for caring for it.

He says that in Japan, some of the trees have sold for $500,000. But here you can find affordable trees for as little as $5.

“It really depends on the age and design of the tree, its beauty and maintenance, and the pot itself.”

Mother and son horticulturists Megumi and Alex Bennett run a bonsai nursery on Sydney’s northern beaches.

If you’re looking for an affordable option, they recommend starting with a younger stock and letting it grow.

Mother and son Megumi and Alex Bennett at their bonsai nursery in Sydney.(Daily ABC: Christian Harimanow)

What type of bonsai to choose

Mr. Kosasih recommends starting with a juniper, as they are hardy and fairly common throughout the country, both in colder regions and in tropical areas.

Ms. Bennett suggests native figs like Port Jackson or Moreton Bay, as they are also hardy and difficult to kill.

Native figs typically grow on the east coast from New South Wales to Queensland. They also do well in tropical climates like the NT, but will find areas like Tasmania too cold.

What you will need

Besides the tree and the pot, you will also need a variety of tools to effectively care for your bonsai.

Mr. Kosasih says you should have a pair of bonsai scissors, wire, wire cutters and branch cutters in your bonsai toolbox.

It is also important to avoid using standard potting soil. He explains if you’re using “from the dirt you get from [major hardware stores]what tends to happen is that it clogs the drainage holes and that will really hamper the growth of the tree” because the roots cannot develop properly.

Instead, visit your local bonsai nursery or search online for a bonsai soil mix.

Mr Kosasih says it is usually “a mixture of pine bark, pumice stones, volcanic rocks and other inorganic materials, just to add drainage to the soil mixture”.

Where to place your bonsai

Although it is in a pot, Mr. Kosasih points out that “indoor bonsai does not exist”.

“Trees are designed by nature, they are meant to be outdoors.”

A sunny position in your garden or on your balcony is the optimal place for most bonsai.

As Ms Bennett explains, bonsai like rain and a “sunny position and ventilation like the wind”.

“Morning dew [is also] very important for plants because they are the same as garden trees.”

If you live in an apartment with no outdoor space, Kosasih says some tropical species adapt well indoors due to the heat and humidity.

Lawson sits on his balcony, showing off his bonsai collection.
Lawson with his bonsai collection.(Provided)

When to water a bonsai

It’s important to remember that bonsai are not like the succulents you might be used to. They need lots of water.

“Eighty percent of all beginner bonsai deaths can be due to lack of watering,” says Kosasih.

In summer you should water your bonsai every day or even twice a day when it is very hot. You can also temporarily move it to the shade during those 40 degree days.

Watering every couple of days in the winter should be fine, but it depends on your climate, so ask the nursery staff how often to water your bonsai when you buy it.

Mr Bennett says that if you keep your bonsai outside and it’s raining, you should always keep an eye on it to make sure the water has penetrated deep enough into the ground.

You can do this by picking up the tree to feel its weight, sticking your finger in the ground, and checking to see if it’s wet underneath.

Ms. Bennett’s advice is to always remember your daily routine: “Wash your face, clean your teeth and water the bonsai.”

Potting, wiring and pruning

These steps are a bit trickier and not essential during your first few months of bonsai care.

You can ask your nursery how often to repot your bonsai – usually every few years.

Mr Kosasih explains that repotting involves pruning the roots to keep the tree healthy, “usually at the end of winter and you usually only do it because the tree has outgrown the pot” .

“You have to remove the tree from the pot, cut the roots and put it back in the same pot or in another one.”

Mr. Kosasih prunes a bonsai.
Austen Kosasih tends to her bonsai.(Provided)

Bonsai tree pruning and wiring is done for aesthetics to create a certain look.

“To make it work, you wrap the wire around the branches, so you can design the shape of the tree,” says Kosasih.

To prune, cut off any branches that don’t match the design you’re aiming for in your tree.

Although bonsai care can seem complicated, Bennett advises to have fun and learn as you go, because “every good bonsai practitioner has killed a few trees”.

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The ancient history and symbolic meaning of bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/the-ancient-history-and-symbolic-meaning-of-bonsai/ Sat, 06 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-ancient-history-and-symbolic-meaning-of-bonsai/ Photo: Photos by Thanun Patiparnthada/Shutterstock Bonsai trees have a strong association with Japan. But did you know that the art of growing miniature trees actually originated in ancient China? In 700 CE, the Chinese used special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers. The practice became known as “pun-sai” (or “penzai”) and was originally cultivated […]]]>

Photo: Photos by Thanun Patiparnthada/Shutterstock

Bonsai trees have a strong association with Japan. But did you know that the art of growing miniature trees actually originated in ancient China? In 700 CE, the Chinese used special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers. The practice became known as “pun-sai” (or “penzai”) and was originally cultivated only by the elite of society. It was not until the Kamakura period (1185 to 1333) that the cultivation of miniature trees in pots was introduced to Japan. And today, even western nature lovers grow and care for bonsai like living works of art.

Read on to learn the history and meaning of these special trees.

a bonsai

A Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) bonsai, China Collection 111, on display at the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in the United States National Arboretum. (Photo: WikimediaCommons (CC BY-SA 3.0))

What is the meaning of the term bonsai?

Bonsai is a Japanese word meaning “tree in a pot”. However, the term originally comes from the Chinese word “pun-sai” or “penjing”. In Chinese, “pen” means pot and “jing” means decor or landscape.

Bonsai trees are meant to be a miniature representation of nature, planted in decorative containers.

What does bonsai symbolize?

When bonsai trees were first introduced to China over 1,300 years ago, they were considered a status symbol among the elite of society. Today, however, bonsai trees are enjoyed by people all over the world.

Depending on a person’s culture or beliefs, bonsai trees are considered symbols of harmony, balance, patience, or even luck. Many people simply use potted trees as living ornaments for interior decoration, while others – Zen Buddhists for example – think of bonsai as an object of meditation or contemplation.

The history of bonsai in China

a bonsai

Penzai mural in the Tang dynasty tomb of Prince Zhanghuai, 706 AD (Photo: WikimediaCommons Public Domain)

In ancient China, early explorers were probably the first to discover miniature trees growing high in the mountains. This climate saw harsh conditions where growth was difficult, so the prized dwarf trees were particularly gnarled in appearance. As early as the 4th century BCE, Taoists believed that recreating aspects of nature in miniature allowed people to access their magical properties. Hence, penjing was born. It involved creating miniature landscapes displayed on earthenware.

In an effort to recreate the natural trees they found in the mountains, the Chinese developed pruning and binding techniques that gave plants twisted shapes and an aged look. Some historians believe that the Taoists shaped the branches and trunks of miniature trees to resemble animals from Chinese folklore, such as dragons and snakes. Others believe that the distorted plant formations resemble yoga positions.

The first pictorial evidence of artistically formed miniature trees appeared in 706 CE in the tomb of Prince Zhang Huai. Upon entering, archaeologists discovered murals depicting servant girls wearing penjing, which contained miniature trees and rocks.

The history of bonsai in Japan

a bonsai

Japanese woodblock print by Keisai Eisen, 1848 (Photo: WikimediaCommons (CC0 1.0))

During the reign of the Hang dynasty, Chinese monks migrated to Japan and other parts of Asia, taking with them examples of penzai. Japanese Zen Buddhist monks learned the techniques needed to make miniature trees, later known as bonsai. The Japanese developed their own methods for creating dwarf trees, resulting in different styles compared to Chinese penzai.

Japanese bonsai trees were usually about one to two feet tall and required many years of expert care. The branches, trunks and roots got their twisted look by maintaining the desired shape – using bamboo and wire – as the tree grew. And to achieve a particular shape, artists often grafted new branches onto existing ones. Some species even bore fruit, while others bloomed leaves and flowers. By the 14th century bonsai trees were considered a highly respected art form. Prized plants quickly made their way from monasteries to the king’s houses. Just like in China, trees have become symbols of status and honor.

In the early 1600s, Japanese bonsai evolved again. Skilled artists began to use special pruning techniques to remove all but essential parts of plants. This created a minimalist look, which reflects the Japanese philosophy and belief that “less is more”. In medieval times (1185 to 1603), bonsai became accessible to people of all social classes. The increased demand meant that more people had to learn the art of bonsai, and soon miniature trees were commonplace in almost every Japanese home.

Related Articles:

Mini bonsai trees can grow full sized apples, quinces and pomegranates

Bonsai Master Masahiko Kimura Creates Gravity-Defying Mini-Forests

Artist Turns Wire Into Bonsai Trees That Will Live Forever

391-Year-Old Bonsai Survived Hiroshima Bombings and Still Growing

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DIY pine cone bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/diy-pine-cone-bonsai/ Tue, 12 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/diy-pine-cone-bonsai/ Japanese pine bonsai – pxfuel Pattison of Geneva During the colder months, the desire to leave the warm comfort of the interior becomes less inviting. For gardeners, this can be a pretty slow time, where you find yourself cleaning up more leaves rather than growing exciting new plants. One way to combat this seasonal lull […]]]>

Japanese pine bonsai – pxfuel

Pattison of Geneva

During the colder months, the desire to leave the warm comfort of the interior becomes less inviting. For gardeners, this can be a pretty slow time, where you find yourself cleaning up more leaves rather than growing exciting new plants. One way to combat this seasonal lull is to bring your garden indoors. This doesn’t mean that all of a sudden you find yourself tripping over containers full of zinnias and forcing the potted magnolia to bloom inside. There is another less stressful and less expensive option: a homemade bonsai.

Bonsai trees are native to Japan and are grown in containers, with an average height of 6 to 8 inches and rarely exceed 10 inches. They are grown to mimic the natural shape and appearance of regular trees, bringing peace and quiet contemplation of nature to the grower’s mind as they cultivate it over time. Bonsai trees are grown like any other tree, from a seed or spring, cutting and growing one from seed to fruiting is considered an art form.

A simple and inexpensive way to try growing your own bonsai is to use a pinecone that you may have picked up on your travels. This could be a really enjoyable project for all ages, and hopefully you’ll have a beautifully interesting new houseplant by the end of the trip. To start, find a pinecone that is mostly still closed. A splayed or found pine cone that has already fallen to the ground means you missed your chance and the seeds have probably fallen.

Pick a pine cone from a tree that hasn’t opened yet and make sure it’s on the wider side. The larger the cone, the better the seed quality. Make sure your pine cones are fungus and pest free. Once you have your desired pine cones, set them aside on a fireplace or windowsill to dry and crack them open slightly. You may notice the seeds begin to fall off as they dry, this is normal. If you prefer to plant the pine seeds without using the pine cone itself in the design, now is the time to set the seeds aside for that. When planting using the pinecone as a design anchor, do not submerge the entire pinecone in the ground. The seeds still remaining in the cone must come out of the woody structure, planting the entire cone under the ground will smother them. Tap your cone several times to loosen the remaining seeds from their protective structure and plant the bottom or horizontal side of the cone loosely into your prepared soil. Water sparingly over the following weeks and when watering your seeds, water around the cone, do not water directly on the pinecone as this may encourage it to rot or develop mould. If all goes according to plan, between 1 and 4 weeks, you should have a newly started bonsai.

If you have chosen to plant the seeds separately from the cone, here are some tips to help you succeed. Keep your harvested seeds dry in a cool, dry place until you are ready to plant them. When you feel ready to plant them, soak the seeds in warm water for 24 hours to prepare them for germination. This will also help separate viable seeds from non-viable seeds, good seeds will sink and poor quality seeds will float. When you’ve separated the good from the bad, wrap them in a damp paper towel or foam in a zip-top bag and put them in the fridge. Keep them in the fridge for a week or two. When that’s done, take your seeds out of the fridge and sprinkle them on a prepared potting soil, covering them lightly with a layer of potting soil. If you want to incorporate the “design look” of the pinecone into your separately planted seeds, place any open, healthy pinecone in your pot without disturbing your seeds. As mentioned above, water sparingly and avoid getting water directly on the pine cone, to avoid mold or fungus.

When successful, these trees make beautiful ornamental pieces, they are a living work of art that you have made yourself. If you’re planning now for next year or have the perfect pine cone at home, this project would make a delightful gift to give to others and is sure to fill a home with peace and quiet over Christmas time.

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Jaya’s bonsai: A botanist and her bonsai garden | Kochi News https://rgbonsai.com/jayas-bonsai-a-botanist-and-her-bonsai-garden-kochi-news/ Wed, 26 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/jayas-bonsai-a-botanist-and-her-bonsai-garden-kochi-news/ Don’t throw away that little Banyan tree you find under your water tank or on a cracked wall, it could make a good bonsai,” advises Jaya P Nair, a bonsai enthusiast and secretary of the Kerala Bonsai Association. One is inclined to heed the advice because Raj Bhavan’s controller, Thiruvananthapuram, who is due to retire […]]]>
Don’t throw away that little Banyan tree you find under your water tank or on a cracked wall, it could make a good bonsai,” advises Jaya P Nair, a bonsai enthusiast and secretary of the Kerala Bonsai Association. One is inclined to heed the advice because Raj Bhavan’s controller, Thiruvananthapuram, who is due to retire at the end of this month, practices what she preaches.
Jaya is currently busy moving her 200 bonsai trees from Raj Bhavan’s comptroller’s quarters to her home in Maruthankuzhy, and even though the renovation is ongoing, she is making sure her bonsai trees get all the comforts they need. And why not, she has been growing them for 25 years.
These days, after work, she rushes into her Bonsai garden and takes each pot and places them with great care on specially designed iron supports on her balcony. “I don’t want their surroundings disturbed too much as I only recently moved them from the space they have adapted for 25 years. One of the plants died because of it,” she says. Jaya’s bonsai collection largely includes Indian varieties of Ficus species as they are easier to grow in the tropical climate of Kerala. “They adapt easily because they need less water and sun to grow.”

Jaya’s love for bonsai first blossomed when she attended an exhibition in Kanakakunnu in the late 90s. seduced by Bonsai and its greenery. I was also inspired by my friends, who are bonsai lovers and that’s how I started collecting my own plants. It’s hard at first, but you learn to be patient, just to see the plants grow,” says Jaya, who also owns foreign plants such as Beggars Bowl, Baobab, Candle Tree and the ornamental Pony Tail Palm.
While she says Bonsai gardening can be expensive, she explains, “We could get a Bonsai from `500. One is enough if you like the plant. You can prune its small branches and create one yourself in a pot. One can even grow the parasitic plants found in cracked walls or on tall trees as a Bonsai plant. In this way, we also promote green living. I would like to give away the stems for free to those who would like to make their own bonsai.
Bonsai cultivation could also be a new way to enhance greenery in urban buildings, she says.
“We now have space constraints in the apartments. Thus, growing even two bonsai on the balcony is enough to start a green life.
On the process of growing a Bonsai plant, she says, “Feeding a Bonsai plant is similar to growing life-size plants. It can take years to see the plant turn into a good bonsai as it follows its natural life cycle. The taproots are initially cut and we feed the surface roots of the tree species resulting in a miniature version of the plant.

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A Bonsai plant should always be grown in one of three triangular shapes – acute, obtuse and scalene, she says. “Add mud, sand and manure in equal proportions. For manure, neem cake or dilute cow dung can be used which would help them grow fast and healthy. More importantly, keep in mind that Bonsai is not a houseplant.
Jaya, whose plan is to spread bonsai cultivation in the state, is excited about her life after retirement. “I want to focus more on my Bonsai gardening and for the next six months I will be busy with them. I can guarantee that if you can grow a Bonsai plant, you will become patient, develop perseverance and achieve peace of mind. mind. I had been through a lot of professional and personal stress and what helped me keep my mind clear through it all was my bonsai trees. Highly recommend this to the younger generation, especially boys, because it will help them to become tolerant, responsible and control their hot temper which is often seen in most men these days.
Photo courtesy: Satheeshan Karicheri
look A botanist and her bonsai garden

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Bonsai gardening is making inroads https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-gardening-is-making-inroads/ Mon, 17 Sep 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-gardening-is-making-inroads/ People, in recent times, are drawn to bonsai breeding due to the lack of gardening space with increasing urbanization. Plant lovers in Vijayawada are also turning to bonsai horticulture these days. With greater awareness of gardening and horticulture and with the development of international standards, gardening enthusiasts are growing plants in all possible places available […]]]>

People, in recent times, are drawn to bonsai breeding due to the lack of gardening space with increasing urbanization. Plant lovers in Vijayawada are also turning to bonsai horticulture these days.

With greater awareness of gardening and horticulture and with the development of international standards, gardening enthusiasts are growing plants in all possible places available in homes.

Vertical gardens and rooftop gardens are some of the options chosen to give homes more elegance these days. In the recent past, people have shifted from vertical and rooftop gardening to planting bonsai, which brings grace and beauty to homes.

Bonsai plants are attractive and create a healthy atmosphere in the house. Naturally, locals make room for bonsai plants in their homes.

Amaravati Bonsai Society (ABS) President Amrita Kumar, speaking to Womenia, said ABS is the first of its kind in Andhra Pradesh. She said, “Bonsai gardening is a Japanese technique that is spreading all over the country and requires a lot of patience and skill.

The company was formed to educate people and train them to prepare bonsai with very minimal soil, which would fit in a small pot. Due to the lack of space, people can have a miniature of a large tree inside the house, which was smaller than a bush.

She said her interest in forming a bonsai society in Vijayawada grew after attending a bonsai exhibit at a horticulture exhibition in Hyderabad. Visitors to the exhibition expressed interest in knowing how to grow bonsai and adopting it as a livelihood option, which prompted her to start a company in Vijayawada when she moved.

She formed the society with 25 members. She said that Vijayawada is a happening place these days and that they would regularly hold awareness programs and classes on bonsai gardening to educate farmers on using the bonsai nursery as a livelihood program.

Amaravati Bonsai Society led by its President Amrita Kumar, Vice President Yerneni Padmaja, Secretary Pathi Naga Lakshmi, Deputy Secretary – Gamini Suneetha, Treasurer Durga Sowjanya Kancherla and one of the members, Dr Neelima, are actively involved in bonsai gardening activities.

She said the cost of the plant ranges from 1,500 rupees to over a lakh depending on the rare variety, size and age of the bonsai. These bonsai plants are placed in shopping complexes, malls, offices and homes nowadays.

There are a variety of bonsai plants and the ones that are readily available include Phycus, Boganvilias, Temple Trees, Edenium, Tamarind and all kinds of fruit plants, wild forest plants, flowering plants, Peepal, Banyan, Umbar, Christmas Tree, Silver Oak, Rose, Bakul and many more.

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Growing Cannabis Bonsai: Separating Fact from Fiction https://rgbonsai.com/growing-cannabis-bonsai-separating-fact-from-fiction/ Wed, 28 Jun 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/growing-cannabis-bonsai-separating-fact-from-fiction/ Imagine having a miniature cannabis plant that you could simply put in your window, with pretty green branches emerging from its artistically spiraling center. Sounds pretty amazing, right? It’s the cannabis bonsai dream, an idea that has gained popularity in recent years and continues to be a hot topic. A quick Google search will bring […]]]>

Imagine having a miniature cannabis plant that you could simply put in your window, with pretty green branches emerging from its artistically spiraling center. Sounds pretty amazing, right? It’s the cannabis bonsai dream, an idea that has gained popularity in recent years and continues to be a hot topic.

A quick Google search will bring up many articles claiming how easy it is to grow a cannabis bonsai, along with guides or step-by-step instructions. However, most come with hard-to-believe photos or renderings of said bonsai tree. Do these projects actually work?

Want to know more about growing cannabis? Check out Leafly’s grow guide for tips and advice from expert growers.

To get to the bottom of this intriguing topic, I consulted the minds of those who have experience with bonsai and cannabis. My main question: Is it even possible to grow a cannabis bonsai?

What is bonsai, and why would cannabis growers like it?

The key to bonsai is the word “miniature”. Unlike other potted plants, the joy of bonsai is in creating a small landscape that is meant to be a replica of the natural world. The bonsai has a long and rich history which originates from parts of China and Japan and may have started as early as 700 AD.

Also, just as “miniature” is key to bonsai, so too is the “art form”. It’s not a houseplant that you can put in a pot and let grow willy-nilly – bonsai trees are artistic endeavors that take time and care to cultivate. Many bonsai trees are even passed down from generation to generation, long surviving those who first gave loving attention to their branches.

Laurel Cleveland saw such bonsai at Pacific Bonsai Museum in Washington State, home to Hiroshima bonsai, as well as many others. Cleveland is the creative director of Washington’s Vela, a cannabis dispensary that shares space with a cannabis culture. This convenience allows him to witness the evolution of plants on a daily basis. Along with growing her own cannabis plants in the past and having a wealth of experience in horticulture, the aptly named Laurel has also developed a keen love for growing bonsai.

When it comes to bonsai and cannabis plants, there’s one thing she believes is important to both: a healthy respect for the plant. “I think it’s a really good way for people to start exploring [what it takes to grow] cannabis,” she says of the labor-intensive practice of growing bonsai. “If bonsai is something they already know, more than just putting something on their porch…cannabis requires a lot more care and dedication, as does bonsai, and I think that’s exactly what he deserves.”

Unfortunately, due to home growing laws in Washington, Cleveland is unable to experiment with growing its own cannabis bonsai. Still, the topic has certainly been popular lately, which Cleveland has noticed. So why this sudden resurgence of interest?

“Honestly, people want to feed and take care of something, and sometimes animals aren’t the best fit for younger generations because they work a lot and can’t necessarily give people the love and attention they need. animals. So they redirect that to the plants,” says Cleveland.

Many cannabis growers would like to see a bonsai version in their usual yield, but is that possible or just a pipe dream?

The possibilities of cannabis and bonsai

Scott Chadd is 73 years old, retired and has been growing bonsai for more than half his life. It has been an eponymous “bonsai” for 45 years. He lives in California where he owns the Lotus Bonsai Nursery and president of the Golden State Bonsai Federation.

Chadd was happy to discuss the topic of cannabis bonsai, but his perspective came with a healthy dose of skepticism.

“Not all plants are suitable for bonsai,” he says. “It is quite complex to cover the reasons, but I will list a few. The leaves cannot be large in relation to the trunk and the branch or the stem of the plant. It should have a trunk that tapers from large at the bottom to small at the top. It should have trunk movement and interesting bark. Like all visual art, we mainly deal with line, shape, texture and color. The bonsai must have visual interest, be able to hold the eye of the viewer, and be vigorous enough to withstand the rigors of bonsai cultivation.

With that in mind, does he think there could be a place for cannabis in the bonsai world? “I don’t believe cannabis produces acceptable bonsai trees,” says Chadd.

“It is a very fast growing, fastigiated shrub with large leaves relative to the size of the trunk and stem. It is angular, not graceful, or exhibiting curves or movement. As for its dimensions, we normally seek to have a bonsai where the tree is six times larger than the diameter of the trunk at the ground line. It does not have a long lifespan and does not have any special characteristics other than the cannabinoid effect on human psychic activity.

Cleveland, for its part, also foresees challenges for the aspiring cannabis bonsai cultivator.

“I think it would be a huge challenge, definitely. I think it would probably depend on the life cycle, depending on the genetics of the plant. I’ve seen cannabis plants from growers with roots like no other, so I think as far as roots go, they have the ability to ground themselves very well. Although the amount of space in the pot can be a huge factor, it’s such a vigorous plant that I feel like it’s able to grow just about anywhere. The amount of attention and care you would need to give him would be difficult.

That said, Cleveland allows it, “if you have the time to experiment, I think it would be worth a try.” She doesn’t see as many pitfalls as Chadd: for example, the rapid growth of cannabis is seen as an advantage in her mind, rather than a downfall of the plant.

“I think people who know bonsai will have a little less of a learning curve,” she says. “If you lose a bonsai, it’s heartbreaking, because it takes years and years to grow it. Cannabis grows faster, so because cannabis is so vigorous and hearty, you can see the changes happen faster and learn more about the plant.

Caring for a cannabis bonsai

As for the classic form of bonsai? Well, maybe there is some hope. Cleveland believes that with low-stress training and ample time and space, a cannabis plant could grow into the shape a grower desires. His theory is credited by YouTuber Andre Pyrah. Based in Amsterdam, Pyrah experimented on her channel with growing cannabis and managed to train some plants to twist and bend in shapes reminiscent of traditional bonsai.

Will we see more growers trying cannabis bonsai? Cleveland thinks it’s just a matter of time. “I think it’s just a matter of experimentation, and lots of failures,” she says, “but that’s with anything, right? Growing a warehouse full of cannabis is also a difficult task, so anything is possible.

What about flowering? Could a real cannabis bonsai produce a smokable product? The answer to this may lie in the flowering cycles of other bonsai trees. While bonsai trees may be allowed to enter a flowering life cycle, many growers report that many of these trees do not return after flowering (depending on strain and genetics). So, it remains to be seen if a flowering cannabis bonsai would come back with the same vigor it had before, or even survive.

Ultimately, the art of bonsai is perhaps less about what the tree can do for you, and more about what you can do for the tree. The cultivation of bonsai is a task that requires the artist to show precision, care and attention to the tree. The reward lies in the beauty of creation, the joy of seeing a landscape of the world in miniature form, and the knowledge you have nurtured from this. If there’s one thing bonsai and cannabis growers share, it’s a deep passion for their plants. With time and dedication, chances are we will eventually see the two passions merged into one.

Raeland

Rae Lland is a freelance writer, journalist and former editor of Weedist and The Leaf Online. With a focus on culture, music, health and wellness, in addition to her work for Leafly, she has also been featured in numerous online cannabis publications as well as print editions of the magazine. Cannabis Now. Follow her on Instagram @rae.lland

See articles by Rae Lland

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Making the art of bonsai attractive to millennials https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”. But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old […]]]>

When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”.

But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old man who has been fascinated by bonsai since he was 18.

“Bonsai is the art of growing [a tree] in a container and miniaturizing it by pruning it to look like a mature tree growing in nature, ”Packard said. “Corn [the intention is to] also exude an artistic quality beyond what you would normally see in a natural, wild tree.

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Packard says the art of gardening is often seen as a hobby someone’s grandfather would do, or of particular interest to people who study and appreciate Asian culture. But he wants people to see small trees like him, where nature meets art.

“We don’t really need more bonsai practitioners, we need more bonsai enthusiasts,” he said. “I approach bonsai much more as an art than a craft and I try to instill in people an appreciation for these trees.”

Modern bonsai

His latest effort to make natural art more accessible to younger people was a six-month exhibition called Decked Out. He paired 16 of the museum’s bonsai trees with skateboards painted by local graffiti artists, including women and people of color.

“The idea was to replace the traditional Japanese scroll that we used in Japan to display it with our bonsai to create a theme, setting or location,” Packard said. “But instead of having that vertical artistic image depicted on a traditional roller, use a skateboard.”

Packard has been its curator for two years. So far, his efforts have paid off.

“We have had a 25% increase in our visits so far this year to date,” he said. “I certainly see a much wider range of visitors coming. A lot more tattoos are appearing in the collection which is a good thing.

Packard says bonsai arrived in the United States after World War II, when soldiers deployed to Japan returned to the United States with a new interest in Japanese culture. He thinks the key to engaging young people is to modernize the approach to the subject. After so many years of studying and practicing this traditional art form, he believes he has earned the right to interpret it through an American lens.

“I got to the point where, OK, I’ve been there, I’ve done this,” Packard said. “Now, what can we do that is different while still respecting this traditional aspect? We don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, so to speak. We still try to maintain this art form and still try to work within the framework of what bonsai is, but make it more relevant to me living in 2016 as a 35 year old American.

“So what does it look like?” ” he added. “Ultimately it’s going to be a bit of a step back, but there have been more people who are excited about this idea of ​​where we can take this historically traditional art form and make it a lot more unique. . “

Packard is already busy planning his next exhibit, and he’s reminding people that entry to the Pacific Bonsai Museum is free.

A Bonsai-Shore pine. His age is unknown. The Bridge is an oil painting on wood titled “Surroundings” by Tehya Sullivan. (Photo courtesy of the Pacific Bonsai Museum)

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