bonsai cultivation http://rgbonsai.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:42:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png bonsai cultivation http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 ‘Bonsai Factory’, The Theory and Practice of Bonsai Cultivation – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-factory-the-theory-and-practice-of-bonsai-cultivation-the-new-indian-express/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-factory-the-theory-and-practice-of-bonsai-cultivation-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service The cramped neighborhood of Rohini in West Delhi, home to tall buildings and tiny balconies, includes a terrace that houses hundreds of small bonsai trees, adding greenery to the cityscape. The work of 79-year-old Mangat Singh Thakur, this bonsai garden features more than 550 bonsai trees, including species like Chinese orange, mango, […]]]>

Express press service

The cramped neighborhood of Rohini in West Delhi, home to tall buildings and tiny balconies, includes a terrace that houses hundreds of small bonsai trees, adding greenery to the cityscape.

The work of 79-year-old Mangat Singh Thakur, this bonsai garden features more than 550 bonsai trees, including species like Chinese orange, mango, guava, which Thakur has diligently maintained since 2001. Its compact terrace is the place where he experiments with art.

Thakur believes bonsai cultivation is not just a routine practice; it is an art, a philosophy and a form of exercise. His interest and willingness to continue working despite his advanced age keeps him going.

Bonsai plant from China orange

years of learning
A traditional Japanese art form, bonsai cultivation refers to the practice of growing a plant in a miniature form. A bonsai tree, if planted and cared for properly, can live for hundreds of years.

Thakur first discovered the concept in 1978 at a workshop organized by the Indian Bonsai Association at ITC Maurya in Delhi. Here, Thakur understood the basics of these plants. “The more I learned, the more interested I became,” he says. After retiring in 2001, Thakur decided to carve out more space for himself to get serious about bonsai planting.

The first bonsai he planted was a banyan tree in 1972, which is still in good condition on his terrace. “This tree accompanied me throughout my transfers to various places in India. It taught me a lot about this art,” he comments.

As his collection grows day by day, Thakur makes it a point to spend two to three hours in his garden. During potting season (usually February), he works on his plants for about six hours.

Catalyst for change
Thakur was able to introduce the theory and practice of bonsai cultivation to a wide audience. He regularly posts informative bonsai videos on his “Bonsai Factory” YouTube channel – he has over 9,000 subscribers – and also hosts virtual classes for enthusiasts. He taught over 100 students in nine batches; its tenth batch begins in February.

Thakur’s work has also been widely appreciated. “I became more popular after my retirement than when I worked in the bank (laughs).”

Hoping to take these lessons forward, Thakur is writing a book on bonsai planting in Hindi. Understanding bonsai can help farmers use their resources properly, and so, Thakur adds, his book will be geared towards farmers and gardeners.

“Most bonsai books are in English and are expensive. I thought I should write in Hindi so that it reaches the common man. I also plan to keep the cost low so people can easily buy these books,” he says.

Although he is no less than a master of bonsai cultivation who is well versed in the ins and outs of this art form, Thakur still considers himself a student. “I am not an artist. I am simply a student and will remain so until the day I die,” he concludes.

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This banker has 550 trees on his terrace! https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s. This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. […]]]>

MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s.

This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. Leila Dhanda popularized the art form in the capital by founding the Indian Bonsai Association. “And I was lucky enough to come across a group of women who worked for her, in a vegetable garden that I frequented,” he says.

“I didn’t even know what a bonsai was at the time, and oddly enough, they didn’t really have a clue either. However, they walked me through the basics and I attended my first workshop at the (ITC) Maurya Sheraton soon after. I come from very humble beginnings and was hesitant to even enter the hotel premises. But as I learned more about how to grow bonsai at home, I only became more interested in the art,” he adds.

Despite his inclinations, Mangat’s work and family responsibilities kept him busy until 2001. Then, as a retired man, he was finally able to devote most of his days to perfecting a green thumb and cultivates currently up to 550 bonsai trees on its roof. terrace in Rohini.

“About 35 years ago, I potted my first bonsai, a banyan tree. I still have it today. In the early years, I spent hours meditating on books on bonsai techniques. But of the dozens of books available in my neighborhood libraries, only a few were written in Hindi. I decided that if I ever had the chance, I would write one myself. And now I am, ”says Mangat The best India.

Since 2019, he has also been sharing detailed video tutorials on growing and caring for the exotic plant on Bonsai Factory, his YouTube channel with nearly 9,000 subscribers.

“For the past few years, my main focus has been to bring bonsai techniques to the common man across the country. If we introduce it to marginalized farmers in rural and remote areas, they can make good use of their existing land and resources to establish a highly profitable model. With my videos, [I hope] they can at least discover that they have the possibility to do it and find out how to start,” he adds.

Although Mangat has finished writing his book, he says the accompanying photographs and illustrations are not yet complete, adding that he is planning a release in April next year.

“More a work of art than hard work”

“The best thing about growing bonsai is that you don’t need any special seeds to start with. You can use any plant that has the ability to grow into a tree,” he notes. Here, ‘bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘sai’ means ‘tree’, so it is not a separate species, but rather a miniature form of a larger tree. Yet, I find it really fascinating that the fruit of bonsai is the same size as a tree.

“People often make growing bonsai a time-consuming and expensive affair. But it’s more of a work of art than hard work. If you spend time understanding the basics of feeding a bonsai tree, you can make one easily and ensure that it will survive for decades,” he says.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Mangat has also started taking online courses to raise awareness of bonsai cultivation techniques. He says the sessions are priced at Rs 5,000 per participant for a 15-day batch, and they focus only on theoretical concepts for the first 10.

“Even a doctor spends two-thirds of his life buried in books. I don’t claim to be able to make anyone master the subject in two weeks, but enough is learned to pursue it with consideration. I have taught over 150 people so far, from high school students to managers, pilots and engineers. I am proud to do this work at 80 years old,” he shares.

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How to make bonsai soil:

Mangat points out that the first thing to keep in mind when growing bonsai trees is that their maximum height is only three feet. “They are grown in a confined space and in limited soil, so their roots don’t spread like large trees and require more nutrition through the soil,” he says.

“There are a lot of things to consider when preparing the soil. It should be light, but rich in nutrients at the same time,” says Mangat. “For this you can combine 15% nursery soil, 10% manure, 3% neem cake fertilizer, 4-5% chalk, 10% pit sand (badarpur), 5% brick chunks, 5% raw charcoal chunks, 2% ash-based fertilizer, 10% coir dust, 10% bone meal and 15% dry leaves. You can also add a few pieces of rotten wood to spice up the mix.

After mixing these ingredients well, Mangat says, you have to pass the mixture through three types of sieves with different sizes of holes. “After straining the potting mix through the first sieve, any large stones or twigs that remain should be kept separately in a plastic container. This is the first type of soil,” he adds.

After filtering the remaining soil, pass it through the second sieve. Remove the soil that remains in this sieve and store it in another container – this is the second type of soil.

Now the soil you get after sieving through the second sieve should be sieved through the third sieve. Soil that does not filter through the third sieve is the third type of soil. After filtering, the remaining fine soil is the fourth type of soil.

Soils should not be stored in polythene, but rather collected in separate utensils or containers and dried in the sun. “We need thick clay for bonsai. If we keep its floor in polyethylene, then moisture gets in and the floor begins to break. One should also avoid mixing any type of chemicals into the bonsai soil, as this will shorten its lifespan,” Mangat explains.

Before planting bonsai in a pot, you must first put the “thick soil” – the first type of soil. After that, the second type of soil should be added, then the third, and the layers should be pressed tightly with your hands. Do not completely fill the jar.

Now place the bonsai there. Add more soil and press it down using any wood. Now place the bonsai in a tub or bucket filled with water. After leaving it in water for three to four hours, place the bonsai in a shady spot.

Other bonsai care tips:

  • Mangat says that watering bonsai trees is also a work of art. You cannot add as much water to it as other trees. Keep in mind that you are giving water in such a way that it does not stay in the pot at all. Bonsai roots are small, and if there is stagnation of water in the pot, the roots start to get damaged, he notes.
  • Avoid giving any type of chemical fertilizer; it is recommended to use only organic manure in bonsai.
  • Don’t apply too much fertilizer at one time. You can apply small amounts of manure at weekly intervals per month, three to four times. It makes bonsai healthier.
  • The wires are used to make bonsai. Therefore, you should also keep checking if a wire periodically damages the bonsai. If you feel the wire is cutting the bonsai, you can remove the wire and restructure it again.
  • Bonsai need to be pruned and “repotted” regularly, says Mangat.
  • After you start repotting, you don’t need to fertilize the bonsai for about a month, he adds. Then you can give the plant liquid manure, only in the evening. In addition to the roots, the bonsai leaves should also be sprayed.

For more information, you can follow Bonsai Factory.

You can read this story in Hindi here.

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The Secret Bonsai Philosophy https://rgbonsai.com/the-secret-bonsai-philosophy/ Mon, 06 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-secret-bonsai-philosophy/ In the 1383 nostyle game potted treesby Japanese poet Zaemi Motokiyo, a poor samurai offers to throw his last three bonsai trees on the fire to warm a traveling monk. That this small act struck contemporary audiences as profoundly noble testifies to the popularity of the art of bonsai cultivation – which Japan had adapted […]]]>

In the 1383 nostyle game potted treesby Japanese poet Zaemi Motokiyo, a poor samurai offers to throw his last three bonsai trees on the fire to warm a traveling monk. That this small act struck contemporary audiences as profoundly noble testifies to the popularity of the art of bonsai cultivation – which Japan had adapted from Chinese Zen Buddhists only 70 years ago – was beginning to gain in the country. .

Even then, bonsai were considered works of art. They were so valuable that people refused to part with them, even in times of financial crisis. Not only do bonsai trees serve as direct manifestations of the trends influencing Japanese aesthetics, but they also function as a means of putting into practice principles unique to Eastern thought. In other words, bonsai trees are as visually appealing as they are intellectually stimulating.

For reasons that will be explained in a moment, the term “bonsai” eventually spread beyond East Asia and entrenched itself in the vocabularies of Western societies. But while nearly every American is able to recognize a bonsai tree the moment we see one, few of us know the traditions and ideas that continue to inform how these iconic little plants are meant to be planted, grown, and cultivated. , potted and exposed.

More than carving trees

Simply put, bonsai is the art of manipulating the growth and appearance of small, young trees to make them look like older, larger trees. When Chinese Buddhists began teaching their traditions in Japanese monasteries, bonsai cultivation was a small but crucial component of a larger program: miniature gardening. Over time, Japanese students transformed this demanding practice into a discipline in its own right, one that emphasized perseverance and quiet contemplation.

Although species like junipers and pines are easier to work with due to their flexible nature, almost any type of plant can be made into bonsai as long as they receive the proper care. Growers work with saplings or plant their own seeds so they can closely monitor the growth of their trees. They analyze the unique characteristics of each bonsai, then choose to present it on a side that accentuates its strengths and hides its imperfections.

In order to give their bonsai trees a more aged look, growers carefully trim the foliage to bring out the shape of the hidden trunk below. Unnecessary or uninteresting branches are amputated, preferably with tools like a concave cutter to minimize scarring. Some may remove parts of the bark, bleaching the exposed sapwood with lime sulfur solutions. This gives the bonsai a weathered appearance, suggesting previous encounters with high winds and bright thunderstorms.

Wabi and sabi

While notions of what bonsai trees should look like vary from age to age, some preferences have remained relatively constant. In addition to having a deceptive appearance of maturity, a good bonsai should show no trace of human intervention; scar tissue must appear natural rather than man-made, while aluminum wires used to bend trunks or reposition branches must be removed or covered before the tree can be exposed.

Unlike Western art movements, symmetry should be avoided at all costs when growing a bonsai tree. Perfectly straight trunks should be bent or countered by cascading foliage in another direction. Branches with abnormally sharp angles should be cut or removed entirely. The most notable bonsai trees have always been asymmetrical in their design, but the arrangement of the branches still manages to impart an undeniable sense of harmony.

The rules that bonsai growers try to follow are not arbitrary but informed by the wisdom of two ancient worldviews. Chief among these influences were Zen Buddhism – a movement based on overcoming the meaninglessness inherent in existence through patience and self-control – and wabi-sabian elusive Japanese concept equally interested in accepting life’s many imperfections through silence, solitude and an unwavering appreciation of how the decaying hand of time affects the world around us.

Recall rather than represent

By growing a bonsai tree, you are essentially acting on ideas formulated by these intertwined branches of Eastern thought. Trees, unlike statues, are not inanimate organisms but living and breathing. A canvas may hold Rembrandt’s or Vermeer’s brushstrokes for hundreds of years, but bonsai trees are always on the move. They develop leaves in certain seasons and lose them in others. Their branches and roots keep twisting and turning, constantly undoing the work of its cultivator.

Saburo Kato, a bonsai master who formed one of the first international communities of growers in the 1980s, compared bonsai cultivation to raising children. This is basically a different way of saying that the art of bonsai is not about creating a flawless masterpiece. Rather, it is an endless and painstaking battle with the forces of nature. To win, practitioners must acquire the kind of perseverance and unconditional kindness normally reserved for devout monks.

Kyozo Murata, another bonsai master, perhaps put it best when he said that the purpose of bonsai trees is not necessarily to represent a thought but to remind us of a feeling: “Bonsai”, a- he said, “not only has a special plant’s natural beauty, but the appearance reminds people of something other than the plant itself. A person awakened to the essential mutability of life does not fear the decline physical or lonely; rather he accepts these facts with a quiet resignation and even finds in them a source of pleasure.

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How to care for bonsai – top tips for caring for compact plants https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC. The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old. Although these beautiful […]]]>

While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC.

The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old.

Although these beautiful trees are commonly associated with Japan, bonsai cultivation began in China, where they became associated with Zen Buddhism.

Shannen Godwin, spokesperson for JParker’s, said, “Bonsai is a living art form that results from the vision of replicating the natural growth and shape of trees, even on a much smaller scale.

“We have noticed that this technique has started to become more popular as people look to improve their skills and the appearance of their gardens.

READ MORE: When to prune a beech hedge: T When op tips and advice for hedge pruning

“It is important to learn that anyone can engage in this ancient practice and find comfort in it, because it is so much more than a variety of trees; it’s a way to bring many varieties to life.

Most Britons, when they think of bonsai, imagine a small potted tree kept in the corner of a living room.

But, some bonsai trees can and should be located outdoors. Here’s a guide to caring for these quiet plants.

How to choose your bonsai

There are many types of bonsai and not all types are the same.

Not all species will be adapted to the unpredictable UK climate.

In most cases it will be too cold to grow bonsai outside the UK.

Most Brits choose to grow bonsai indoors, these compact plants take up little space and can be grown in a container making them the perfect houseplant.

A popular bonsai species well suited to growing indoors is the Ficus, it is easy to grow for novice gardeners, so if you have recently started gardening this might be the perfect choice for you.

Other popular varieties include; Carmona Bonsai, Chinese Elm Bonsai, Crassula (Jade) Bonsai and Serissa Japonica (Snow Rose) Bonsai.

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How to take care of your bonsai

Instead, you should aim to discourage growth at the top of your bonsai, encouraging it to grow downwards.

Your tree should look full and mature on the lower branches and more spindly at the top.

A popular option is to choose a tree with an interesting trunk because the bonsai roots are visible.

The bonsai’s roots are as much a part of the plant’s display as its green foliage.

The branches of your tree will also require attention. They can be shaped in a pattern of choice or you can even shape the branches to grow from side to side.

This can be done by completely stripping the tree of its branches and then rubbing the buds from the side where growth is not desired.

How to water bonsai

These plants have very specific watering needs, to water your bonsai you should submerge the entire bonsai plant in a bucket of water whenever the topsoil seems completely dry. It’s usually about once a week.

Once you have completely submerged your tree in the bucket of water, wait until all air bubbles have risen to the top.

When this has happened, the bonsai has absorbed enough water and can be removed from the bucket.

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How to get started with the best bonsai trees for beginners https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-get-started-with-the-best-bonsai-trees-for-beginners/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-get-started-with-the-best-bonsai-trees-for-beginners/ Photo: TONG2519 (Shutterstock) When you hear the phrase “a bonsai” you are probably thinking of these tiny, ornate trees that people often keep as a kind of desktop ornament. But In fact, Bonsai is not a type of tree at all – the “B” wordonsai” refers to art form and horticultural method of growing miniature […]]]>

Image for article titled How to get started with bonsai trees without killing them

Photo: TONG2519 (Shutterstock)

When you hear the phrase “a bonsai” you are probably thinking of these tiny, ornate trees that people often keep as a kind of desktop ornament. But In fact, Bonsai is not a type of tree at all – the “B” wordonsai” refers to art form and horticultural method of growing miniature landscapes. The art of bonsai native China and evolved when Japan Shrunk the technique focus on miniature trees rather than whole trees gardens.

bonsai cultivation has become a trend which spread to the United States in the years following World War II and is now practiced in homes around the world. Cultivation method requires clarification carve and carve plant care to keep delicate trees alive and maintain their small structure. For novice growers, this process involves bit of a learning curve, but mental health benefits maybe deep. Here are three types of plants that help beginners master the art of bonsai.

What are the benefits of Bonsai gardening?

Bonsai trees are also known as the “tree of life”. They say take care of them reduce stresspromote concentration, and help relieve the symptoms of depression. Less concretely, some believe miniature trees lend a magical properties of the house and their care can bestow prosperity and good luck. It’s a surprisingly deep hobby that you can learn with low initial investment—just a plant and a pair of cubs the shears will get you started. (Of course, as with any other steptime, you can also pay a parcel silver in art.)

How to care for different types of bonsai

Magical thinking aside, tThe plants themselves require no unusually heavy care. Depending on the variety, ththey need very little light, which, coupled with their small size means you put them almost anywhere in your home. With proper attention, unique trees thrive as houseplants.

With all plants, some are more complicated than others. Because bonsai is an art form, different styles of plants require specific care. As a beginner, most of all you want the plant to live while you learn the ropes.

How to keep a ficus bonsai alive

The ficus bonsai is an upright style of tree with flat glossy green leaves. Although bonsai trees can survive in low light conditions, this should be placed near a bright area in your house where he can get at least a few moments of sunshine. Ficus are usually ttropical plants that are accustomed to a humid climate, but these resistant specimens only needs watering once a week, and enjoy from time to time light mist. Most bonsai require similar soil types including lava stone, pumice stone or organic soil. These soils provide good drainage and good moisture retention. Bonsai soil can be purchased at most garden stores and will cost anywhere between $9 and $15 or a bag (depending on type.)

Pruning requires cutting off old leaves after new growth has reached 7 to 10 cm. You will be want to cut the oldest, yellow leaves before they drop to make way for new growth and keep the plant’s miniature size and shape intact. A ficus will usually run you $20 for $60according to the seller and the initial Cut. Ficus are fairly self-sufficient and will remain quite small (varies with their pot size)making them perfect for the beginner still developing their bonsai skills.

How to Grow a Chinese Elm Bonsai

Chinese elm Bonsai has a unique shape, with a twisted trunk that grows straight and produces small dark green leaves. these slow-grow plants give the beginner planter plenty of time to try out his technique. Chinese elm trees like direct sunlight in the spring, but the summer sun is overwhelming, so kkeep them in a bright place area of ​​your home, but remember to shade them during the summer months. Watering is quite simple-tThey don’t require a lot of moisture, so overwatering could lead to root rot. the to place Bonsai Gardener advise: “Check it every few days, [and] water when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch.

Size is only necessary during the spring months, promote germination during the growing season and help the tree keep its small shape. The Chinese elm needs little wiring (the name of process used to shape bonsai trees); prunning alone will keep their shape. Since these trees are popular for their uniqueness look, they can be a bit more expensive, ranging from $35 to $100+. For less than $100, bbeginners can buy one starter kit with everything from pruning shears to fertilizer to start their travel.

How to take care for a jade bonsai

One of the easiest Bonsai to maintain is the variety of jade. Because jade trees are succulents, they require very little attention, but have an unusual and attractive look and feel. They grow upright and their small, fleshy green leaves grow along the stem. They can be treated as a succulent, requiring very little water but an excellent evacuation system. Water them around every 10 at 20 days. Unlike other varieties of bonsai, yYou will want to place them in a dry, warm location with plenty of sun to mimic the desert conditions in which they thrive.

Trimming a jade plant is fun because you can’t really go wrong. You can cut it down to its stems without killing it. Cut keeps the plant small, promotes new growth and thickens its trunk. Jade plants adapt easily to wiring, allowing you to shape the small plants in any direction, making their one of the most durable Bonsai for beginners.

Jade plants are not the cheapest variety of bonsai, but they are mmore affordable than Chinese elms. A jade Bonsai will cost you anywhere from $45 for $80depending on the size. You can practice pruning as you like, and if you forget to water them, it’s OK—they can easily be revived with a little the water.

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Lord of the Little Things: Growing One Bonsai at a Time | News from Meerut https://rgbonsai.com/lord-of-the-little-things-growing-one-bonsai-at-a-time-news-from-meerut/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/lord-of-the-little-things-growing-one-bonsai-at-a-time-news-from-meerut/ MEERUT: For this close-knit urban group, Bonsai is more than just growing miniature plants. What started as a simple pastime for an individual has now turned into a kind of meditation for the whole group, which teaches the value of patience and the flow of life. The term bonsai suggests growing trained trees in small […]]]>
MEERUT: For this close-knit urban group, Bonsai is more than just growing miniature plants. What started as a simple pastime for an individual has now turned into a kind of meditation for the whole group, which teaches the value of patience and the flow of life.
The term bonsai suggests growing trained trees in small containers. For this group of doctors, teachers and housewives, it’s about patiently and dedicatedly cultivating miniature wonders in their own backyards. This includes jade, ficus, jamun, candle tree and others. Bonsai cultivation has become an inseparable part of their life for them.
Dr Shanti Swarup, practicing surgeon and certified bonsai artist who is the mastermind behind the group, said, “Bonsai is a living art that requires a lifelong commitment. The artist is nothing less than a monk in constant prayer. The culture has its roots in China where people began to erect trees 2,000 years ago. Called Penjing, these miniature trees were made as a souvenir. Later the art traveled to Japan where it was refined and became known as bonsai.
A resident of Meerut, Swarup founded the group, known as the Vanulee Study Group, several years ago and gives free bonsai lessons to around 20 students. The group meets once a month. He said, “The first thing I teach my students is patience. The hobby requires the utmost attention at every step. Since we shape trees in small containers compared to their counterparts, they require special handling. “The process begins with transplanting a small plant into shallow trays providing it with a specially designed soil mix. Then begins the bending and pruning of the branches using ancient tools and techniques. The most crucial part is wrapping the wires around the branches to reposition them. Care must be taken not to let the wires dig into the branches as this will leave marks. They must be removed in good time. Wiring is to a bonsai artist what a brush is to a painter. The whole process takes years. The ultimate goal is to shape the tree into its most natural yet miniature form,” he added.
Swarup has nearly 200 bonsai trees in his Defense Colony home and devotes 2-3 hours a day to maintaining them.
One of his students, Deepti Agarwal, who joined his study group about eight years ago, said: “There was a big neglected lawn here and as a housewife I started to interested in its development. It was then that I met Dr. Swarup who encouraged me to pursue art. Her meticulous way of teaching helped me learn quickly. I have 50 plants in my house now.
Another student, Supriya Sondhi, 58, said: “I joined it ten years ago. Although he is strict, he is also the best teacher. Today, I have a hundred Bonsai that adorn my house.
Revealing the origin of his passion, Swarup recalls: “It all started in the mid-80s when I was pursuing post-graduate studies in surgery at Jhansi Medical College. I heard about this new concept of raising trees on shallow plateaus. I managed to buy a book from an old bookstore for Rs 60 and it became my Bonsai Bible. Since then, I’ve been constantly learning the art, developing it, and even helping others master it.
He summarizes: “It’s like a micro-surgery at home but the duration is long, very long.”
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Jaya’s bonsai: A botanist and her bonsai garden | Kochi News https://rgbonsai.com/jayas-bonsai-a-botanist-and-her-bonsai-garden-kochi-news/ Wed, 26 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/jayas-bonsai-a-botanist-and-her-bonsai-garden-kochi-news/ Don’t throw away that little Banyan tree you find under your water tank or on a cracked wall, it could make a good bonsai,” advises Jaya P Nair, a bonsai enthusiast and secretary of the Kerala Bonsai Association. One is inclined to heed the advice because Raj Bhavan’s controller, Thiruvananthapuram, who is due to retire […]]]>
Don’t throw away that little Banyan tree you find under your water tank or on a cracked wall, it could make a good bonsai,” advises Jaya P Nair, a bonsai enthusiast and secretary of the Kerala Bonsai Association. One is inclined to heed the advice because Raj Bhavan’s controller, Thiruvananthapuram, who is due to retire at the end of this month, practices what she preaches.
Jaya is currently busy moving her 200 bonsai trees from Raj Bhavan’s comptroller’s quarters to her home in Maruthankuzhy, and even though the renovation is ongoing, she is making sure her bonsai trees get all the comforts they need. And why not, she has been growing them for 25 years.
These days, after work, she rushes into her Bonsai garden and takes each pot and places them with great care on specially designed iron supports on her balcony. “I don’t want their surroundings disturbed too much as I only recently moved them from the space they have adapted for 25 years. One of the plants died because of it,” she says. Jaya’s bonsai collection largely includes Indian varieties of Ficus species as they are easier to grow in the tropical climate of Kerala. “They adapt easily because they need less water and sun to grow.”

Jaya’s love for bonsai first blossomed when she attended an exhibition in Kanakakunnu in the late 90s. seduced by Bonsai and its greenery. I was also inspired by my friends, who are bonsai lovers and that’s how I started collecting my own plants. It’s hard at first, but you learn to be patient, just to see the plants grow,” says Jaya, who also owns foreign plants such as Beggars Bowl, Baobab, Candle Tree and the ornamental Pony Tail Palm.
While she says Bonsai gardening can be expensive, she explains, “We could get a Bonsai from `500. One is enough if you like the plant. You can prune its small branches and create one yourself in a pot. One can even grow the parasitic plants found in cracked walls or on tall trees as a Bonsai plant. In this way, we also promote green living. I would like to give away the stems for free to those who would like to make their own bonsai.
Bonsai cultivation could also be a new way to enhance greenery in urban buildings, she says.
“We now have space constraints in the apartments. Thus, growing even two bonsai on the balcony is enough to start a green life.
On the process of growing a Bonsai plant, she says, “Feeding a Bonsai plant is similar to growing life-size plants. It can take years to see the plant turn into a good bonsai as it follows its natural life cycle. The taproots are initially cut and we feed the surface roots of the tree species resulting in a miniature version of the plant.

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A Bonsai plant should always be grown in one of three triangular shapes – acute, obtuse and scalene, she says. “Add mud, sand and manure in equal proportions. For manure, neem cake or dilute cow dung can be used which would help them grow fast and healthy. More importantly, keep in mind that Bonsai is not a houseplant.
Jaya, whose plan is to spread bonsai cultivation in the state, is excited about her life after retirement. “I want to focus more on my Bonsai gardening and for the next six months I will be busy with them. I can guarantee that if you can grow a Bonsai plant, you will become patient, develop perseverance and achieve peace of mind. mind. I had been through a lot of professional and personal stress and what helped me keep my mind clear through it all was my bonsai trees. Highly recommend this to the younger generation, especially boys, because it will help them to become tolerant, responsible and control their hot temper which is often seen in most men these days.
Photo courtesy: Satheeshan Karicheri
look A botanist and her bonsai garden

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This Kumta Tree Maker Has Hundreds of Bonsai Beauties – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection. Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a […]]]>

Express press service

KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection.

Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a philosophy, of nature itself. Bonsai is the art of growing miniature trees in pots, where the plants take on the shape and scale of a full-sized tree. This art was developed by the Japanese. People, especially those who face a lack of space in their homes and cannot grow large trees like the banyan tree, have opted for bonsai trees which can be grown in small pots on their patios, outdoors. inside or outside their homes, or even on the stairs. These bonsai trees can be kept alive for over a hundred years. There are those that are over 1,000 years old in the world.

Lakshminarayana R Hegde, 62, the rangeland forest officer, retired from the forest service about four years ago. Before that, he had planned to spend his retirement life setting up a small bonsai garden in his home. And since then, he began to soak up information about growing bonsai in order to fulfill his dream.

After his retirement, he settled in his village of Kallabbe, located about 11 km from the town of Kumta, Uttara Kannada. Next to his house, on a small plot, he developed a bonsai garden named “Kubjavruksha Kalaniketana”. The garden has 36 types of more than 220 bonsai trees.

Hegde says many people dream of having their own garden or a plantation of tall trees near their house. Due to a space problem, they are forced to give up. “Therefore, I decided to use my knowledge of tree conservation that I acquired during my service as a forest officer and educate people on how to grow bonsai at home. Keeping green in and around the house is also good for people and nature,” he says.

He also leads workshops in schools and colleges on the different techniques. ), apart from the cultivation of medicinal and commercial plants. He suggests people grow bonsai according to their zodiac sign as it is widely believed that it will give them good health.

In his garden, the miniature trees have formal and informal shapes, vertical, inclined, etc. Some trees look like groves and others cascade. He gave his trees the shape of a heart, an animal, a human, Lord Ganesha, etc. Most of them are banyan trees. After collecting trees from various places, such as old buildings or forest areas, he cuts the roots and branches to shape them. Over a period of time, the bonsai grows in shape and attracts people. There is a huge market for these trees.
He believes bonsai cultivation is not just a science, it’s an art. “We have to provide water, fertilizer and follow the scientific growth of the trees. At the same time, you can shape trees, so it’s an art,” he says.

MAKING PANS
Hegde does not buy the necessary pots for growing bonsai. He makes his own pots using household items like a bucket, containers, and sometimes cement. He says he hardly invests in any hardware. Its pots vary in shapes like round, square, triangle, hexagon, a boat, etc. He says he must spend a lot of money if he had to buy such different shaped pots and carry them home.

BECOMING ORGANIC
Kallabbe is surrounded by forests in the Western Ghats. This is why Hegde collects the dry leaves and prepares organic fertilizers. He did not use any chemical fertilizers for the bonsai. He advocates organic fertilizers because they give lasting strength to any plant. He spends about 4 hours a day to make and maintain his garden.

HIS COLLECTION
Some bonsai garden trees Calotropis procera, Ficus religiosa, Achyranthes aspera, Ficus racemosa, Butea monosperma, Acacia catechu, Cynodon dactylon, Prosopis cenneraria, Imperata cylindrica

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Growing Cannabis Bonsai: Separating Fact from Fiction https://rgbonsai.com/growing-cannabis-bonsai-separating-fact-from-fiction/ Wed, 28 Jun 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/growing-cannabis-bonsai-separating-fact-from-fiction/ Imagine having a miniature cannabis plant that you could simply put in your window, with pretty green branches emerging from its artistically spiraling center. Sounds pretty amazing, right? It’s the cannabis bonsai dream, an idea that has gained popularity in recent years and continues to be a hot topic. A quick Google search will bring […]]]>

Imagine having a miniature cannabis plant that you could simply put in your window, with pretty green branches emerging from its artistically spiraling center. Sounds pretty amazing, right? It’s the cannabis bonsai dream, an idea that has gained popularity in recent years and continues to be a hot topic.

A quick Google search will bring up many articles claiming how easy it is to grow a cannabis bonsai, along with guides or step-by-step instructions. However, most come with hard-to-believe photos or renderings of said bonsai tree. Do these projects actually work?

Want to know more about growing cannabis? Check out Leafly’s grow guide for tips and advice from expert growers.

To get to the bottom of this intriguing topic, I consulted the minds of those who have experience with bonsai and cannabis. My main question: Is it even possible to grow a cannabis bonsai?

What is bonsai, and why would cannabis growers like it?

The key to bonsai is the word “miniature”. Unlike other potted plants, the joy of bonsai is in creating a small landscape that is meant to be a replica of the natural world. The bonsai has a long and rich history which originates from parts of China and Japan and may have started as early as 700 AD.

Also, just as “miniature” is key to bonsai, so too is the “art form”. It’s not a houseplant that you can put in a pot and let grow willy-nilly – bonsai trees are artistic endeavors that take time and care to cultivate. Many bonsai trees are even passed down from generation to generation, long surviving those who first gave loving attention to their branches.

Laurel Cleveland saw such bonsai at Pacific Bonsai Museum in Washington State, home to Hiroshima bonsai, as well as many others. Cleveland is the creative director of Washington’s Vela, a cannabis dispensary that shares space with a cannabis culture. This convenience allows him to witness the evolution of plants on a daily basis. Along with growing her own cannabis plants in the past and having a wealth of experience in horticulture, the aptly named Laurel has also developed a keen love for growing bonsai.

When it comes to bonsai and cannabis plants, there’s one thing she believes is important to both: a healthy respect for the plant. “I think it’s a really good way for people to start exploring [what it takes to grow] cannabis,” she says of the labor-intensive practice of growing bonsai. “If bonsai is something they already know, more than just putting something on their porch…cannabis requires a lot more care and dedication, as does bonsai, and I think that’s exactly what he deserves.”

Unfortunately, due to home growing laws in Washington, Cleveland is unable to experiment with growing its own cannabis bonsai. Still, the topic has certainly been popular lately, which Cleveland has noticed. So why this sudden resurgence of interest?

“Honestly, people want to feed and take care of something, and sometimes animals aren’t the best fit for younger generations because they work a lot and can’t necessarily give people the love and attention they need. animals. So they redirect that to the plants,” says Cleveland.

Many cannabis growers would like to see a bonsai version in their usual yield, but is that possible or just a pipe dream?

The possibilities of cannabis and bonsai

Scott Chadd is 73 years old, retired and has been growing bonsai for more than half his life. It has been an eponymous “bonsai” for 45 years. He lives in California where he owns the Lotus Bonsai Nursery and president of the Golden State Bonsai Federation.

Chadd was happy to discuss the topic of cannabis bonsai, but his perspective came with a healthy dose of skepticism.

“Not all plants are suitable for bonsai,” he says. “It is quite complex to cover the reasons, but I will list a few. The leaves cannot be large in relation to the trunk and the branch or the stem of the plant. It should have a trunk that tapers from large at the bottom to small at the top. It should have trunk movement and interesting bark. Like all visual art, we mainly deal with line, shape, texture and color. The bonsai must have visual interest, be able to hold the eye of the viewer, and be vigorous enough to withstand the rigors of bonsai cultivation.

With that in mind, does he think there could be a place for cannabis in the bonsai world? “I don’t believe cannabis produces acceptable bonsai trees,” says Chadd.

“It is a very fast growing, fastigiated shrub with large leaves relative to the size of the trunk and stem. It is angular, not graceful, or exhibiting curves or movement. As for its dimensions, we normally seek to have a bonsai where the tree is six times larger than the diameter of the trunk at the ground line. It does not have a long lifespan and does not have any special characteristics other than the cannabinoid effect on human psychic activity.

Cleveland, for its part, also foresees challenges for the aspiring cannabis bonsai cultivator.

“I think it would be a huge challenge, definitely. I think it would probably depend on the life cycle, depending on the genetics of the plant. I’ve seen cannabis plants from growers with roots like no other, so I think as far as roots go, they have the ability to ground themselves very well. Although the amount of space in the pot can be a huge factor, it’s such a vigorous plant that I feel like it’s able to grow just about anywhere. The amount of attention and care you would need to give him would be difficult.

That said, Cleveland allows it, “if you have the time to experiment, I think it would be worth a try.” She doesn’t see as many pitfalls as Chadd: for example, the rapid growth of cannabis is seen as an advantage in her mind, rather than a downfall of the plant.

“I think people who know bonsai will have a little less of a learning curve,” she says. “If you lose a bonsai, it’s heartbreaking, because it takes years and years to grow it. Cannabis grows faster, so because cannabis is so vigorous and hearty, you can see the changes happen faster and learn more about the plant.

Caring for a cannabis bonsai

As for the classic form of bonsai? Well, maybe there is some hope. Cleveland believes that with low-stress training and ample time and space, a cannabis plant could grow into the shape a grower desires. His theory is credited by YouTuber Andre Pyrah. Based in Amsterdam, Pyrah experimented on her channel with growing cannabis and managed to train some plants to twist and bend in shapes reminiscent of traditional bonsai.

Will we see more growers trying cannabis bonsai? Cleveland thinks it’s just a matter of time. “I think it’s just a matter of experimentation, and lots of failures,” she says, “but that’s with anything, right? Growing a warehouse full of cannabis is also a difficult task, so anything is possible.

What about flowering? Could a real cannabis bonsai produce a smokable product? The answer to this may lie in the flowering cycles of other bonsai trees. While bonsai trees may be allowed to enter a flowering life cycle, many growers report that many of these trees do not return after flowering (depending on strain and genetics). So, it remains to be seen if a flowering cannabis bonsai would come back with the same vigor it had before, or even survive.

Ultimately, the art of bonsai is perhaps less about what the tree can do for you, and more about what you can do for the tree. The cultivation of bonsai is a task that requires the artist to show precision, care and attention to the tree. The reward lies in the beauty of creation, the joy of seeing a landscape of the world in miniature form, and the knowledge you have nurtured from this. If there’s one thing bonsai and cannabis growers share, it’s a deep passion for their plants. With time and dedication, chances are we will eventually see the two passions merged into one.

Raeland

Rae Lland is a freelance writer, journalist and former editor of Weedist and The Leaf Online. With a focus on culture, music, health and wellness, in addition to her work for Leafly, she has also been featured in numerous online cannabis publications as well as print editions of the magazine. Cannabis Now. Follow her on Instagram @rae.lland

See articles by Rae Lland

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Maine Gardener: Bonsai Requires Patience and Skill https://rgbonsai.com/maine-gardener-bonsai-requires-patience-and-skill/ Sun, 13 Dec 2015 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/maine-gardener-bonsai-requires-patience-and-skill/ Bonsai cultivation is complicated. It can take six years or more to create a bonsai from a tree purchased from a nursery or scavenged from the wild. But after all this work and time, some trees grow and die for no apparent reason. In bonsai, an art originating in China over 1,000 years ago, trees […]]]>

Bonsai cultivation is complicated. It can take six years or more to create a bonsai from a tree purchased from a nursery or scavenged from the wild. But after all this work and time, some trees grow and die for no apparent reason.

In bonsai, an art originating in China over 1,000 years ago, trees that normally grow up to 100 feet tall are pruned and trained to grow in a container to a height of about 1 foot. These very neat miniature trees can sell for thousands of dollars.

Colin Lewis has written several bonsai books, judges national shows and is the owner of the Ho Yoku School of Bonsai in Biddeford Pool. He views his bonsai trees as works of art, not just dwarf plants, and his are valued that way as well.

“What you see at garden centers, fairs and malls is to bonsai what cartoon greeting cards are to fine art,” he said. He showed me a 6 inch pine he had just sold for $325.

Lewis works with temperate plants – any that can survive outdoors in Maine’s climate – although he protects most of his bonsai trees in an unheated greenhouse or unheated garage during the winter. Native plants that work particularly well are red spruce, balsam fir and tamaracks, he said, adding that tamaracks are now all the rage.

Bonsai is an art form for the patient gardener. Lewis has a potted yew in his garage that he took – with his permission – from a Kennebunkport lawn three years ago. Now that the yew has finally acclimated to its pot, it will spend the next three years training, pruning branches and pruning roots to create a bonsai tree.

The most important part in plant breeding is the trunk, Lewis said. With deciduous plants, he can cut off all the leaves and branches and new branches will sprout, which he can then form.

If he cuts all the branches from an evergreen, it will die, so he must instead shape some of the existing branches. Sometimes he will cut a branch almost completely to shape it. More than that, he said, and the tree would die.

Lewis has a hornbeam bonsai that was 6 feet tall when he brought it home. He cut the branches, hollowed out the trunk to make it look like it had been struck by lightning, and formed it into a striking little tree 12 inches tall.

Timing is everything, Lewis said. With a larch, there are only two weeks a year where you can prune the roots without killing the plant. For other varieties, he can prune the roots for four to six weeks.

You can reach Lewis, an Englishman who moved to the United States in 2001, at colinlewisbonsai.com.

Ernie Glabau of Entwood Bonsai in Burnham has been growing and selling bonsai trees since the 1990s. He is at the other end of the bonsai spectrum.

About 70% of the plants he works with are tropical, which won’t survive Maine’s winters, but can be displayed indoors year-round.

The tropical plants he most often uses to create bonsai are jade plants and ficus, temperate plants are pines and junipers. He typically charges $20 to $25 for his bonsai, he said, selling some on his farm but most of it at fairs and craft shows across the state.

In his experience, most people who have some sensitivity towards plants and are willing to read a little can deal with bonsai. But they have to expect some plants to die. “Anyone who grows bonsai gets used to killing a tree once in a while,” Glabau said.

Find information about Entwood Bonsai at uniquemainefarms.com/uniquemainefarms.com/Entwood_Bonsai.html.

Sue Howard from Scarborough has been taking lessons from Lewis and has been growing bonsai for about three years. She had scheduled an organizational meeting to form a bonsai club for today. But she canceled the meeting a few days ago for lack of response. She asked bonsai enthusiasts reading this story who are interested in forming a club to get in touch: [email protected] Lewis, for his part, hopes they will. A local club, he said, could bring more interest to what he sees as an underrated art form.

Tom Atwell has been writing the Maine Gardener column since 2004. He is a freelance writer who gardens in Cape Elizabeth and can be reached at 767-2297 or [email protected].


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