grow bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:42:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png grow bonsai http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 This banker has 550 trees on his terrace! https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s. This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. […]]]>

MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s.

This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. Leila Dhanda popularized the art form in the capital by founding the Indian Bonsai Association. “And I was lucky enough to come across a group of women who worked for her, in a vegetable garden that I frequented,” he says.

“I didn’t even know what a bonsai was at the time, and oddly enough, they didn’t really have a clue either. However, they walked me through the basics and I attended my first workshop at the (ITC) Maurya Sheraton soon after. I come from very humble beginnings and was hesitant to even enter the hotel premises. But as I learned more about how to grow bonsai at home, I only became more interested in the art,” he adds.

Despite his inclinations, Mangat’s work and family responsibilities kept him busy until 2001. Then, as a retired man, he was finally able to devote most of his days to perfecting a green thumb and cultivates currently up to 550 bonsai trees on its roof. terrace in Rohini.

“About 35 years ago, I potted my first bonsai, a banyan tree. I still have it today. In the early years, I spent hours meditating on books on bonsai techniques. But of the dozens of books available in my neighborhood libraries, only a few were written in Hindi. I decided that if I ever had the chance, I would write one myself. And now I am, ”says Mangat The best India.

Since 2019, he has also been sharing detailed video tutorials on growing and caring for the exotic plant on Bonsai Factory, his YouTube channel with nearly 9,000 subscribers.

“For the past few years, my main focus has been to bring bonsai techniques to the common man across the country. If we introduce it to marginalized farmers in rural and remote areas, they can make good use of their existing land and resources to establish a highly profitable model. With my videos, [I hope] they can at least discover that they have the possibility to do it and find out how to start,” he adds.

Although Mangat has finished writing his book, he says the accompanying photographs and illustrations are not yet complete, adding that he is planning a release in April next year.

“More a work of art than hard work”

“The best thing about growing bonsai is that you don’t need any special seeds to start with. You can use any plant that has the ability to grow into a tree,” he notes. Here, ‘bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘sai’ means ‘tree’, so it is not a separate species, but rather a miniature form of a larger tree. Yet, I find it really fascinating that the fruit of bonsai is the same size as a tree.

“People often make growing bonsai a time-consuming and expensive affair. But it’s more of a work of art than hard work. If you spend time understanding the basics of feeding a bonsai tree, you can make one easily and ensure that it will survive for decades,” he says.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Mangat has also started taking online courses to raise awareness of bonsai cultivation techniques. He says the sessions are priced at Rs 5,000 per participant for a 15-day batch, and they focus only on theoretical concepts for the first 10.

“Even a doctor spends two-thirds of his life buried in books. I don’t claim to be able to make anyone master the subject in two weeks, but enough is learned to pursue it with consideration. I have taught over 150 people so far, from high school students to managers, pilots and engineers. I am proud to do this work at 80 years old,” he shares.

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How to make bonsai soil:

Mangat points out that the first thing to keep in mind when growing bonsai trees is that their maximum height is only three feet. “They are grown in a confined space and in limited soil, so their roots don’t spread like large trees and require more nutrition through the soil,” he says.

“There are a lot of things to consider when preparing the soil. It should be light, but rich in nutrients at the same time,” says Mangat. “For this you can combine 15% nursery soil, 10% manure, 3% neem cake fertilizer, 4-5% chalk, 10% pit sand (badarpur), 5% brick chunks, 5% raw charcoal chunks, 2% ash-based fertilizer, 10% coir dust, 10% bone meal and 15% dry leaves. You can also add a few pieces of rotten wood to spice up the mix.

After mixing these ingredients well, Mangat says, you have to pass the mixture through three types of sieves with different sizes of holes. “After straining the potting mix through the first sieve, any large stones or twigs that remain should be kept separately in a plastic container. This is the first type of soil,” he adds.

After filtering the remaining soil, pass it through the second sieve. Remove the soil that remains in this sieve and store it in another container – this is the second type of soil.

Now the soil you get after sieving through the second sieve should be sieved through the third sieve. Soil that does not filter through the third sieve is the third type of soil. After filtering, the remaining fine soil is the fourth type of soil.

Soils should not be stored in polythene, but rather collected in separate utensils or containers and dried in the sun. “We need thick clay for bonsai. If we keep its floor in polyethylene, then moisture gets in and the floor begins to break. One should also avoid mixing any type of chemicals into the bonsai soil, as this will shorten its lifespan,” Mangat explains.

Before planting bonsai in a pot, you must first put the “thick soil” – the first type of soil. After that, the second type of soil should be added, then the third, and the layers should be pressed tightly with your hands. Do not completely fill the jar.

Now place the bonsai there. Add more soil and press it down using any wood. Now place the bonsai in a tub or bucket filled with water. After leaving it in water for three to four hours, place the bonsai in a shady spot.

Other bonsai care tips:

  • Mangat says that watering bonsai trees is also a work of art. You cannot add as much water to it as other trees. Keep in mind that you are giving water in such a way that it does not stay in the pot at all. Bonsai roots are small, and if there is stagnation of water in the pot, the roots start to get damaged, he notes.
  • Avoid giving any type of chemical fertilizer; it is recommended to use only organic manure in bonsai.
  • Don’t apply too much fertilizer at one time. You can apply small amounts of manure at weekly intervals per month, three to four times. It makes bonsai healthier.
  • The wires are used to make bonsai. Therefore, you should also keep checking if a wire periodically damages the bonsai. If you feel the wire is cutting the bonsai, you can remove the wire and restructure it again.
  • Bonsai need to be pruned and “repotted” regularly, says Mangat.
  • After you start repotting, you don’t need to fertilize the bonsai for about a month, he adds. Then you can give the plant liquid manure, only in the evening. In addition to the roots, the bonsai leaves should also be sprayed.

For more information, you can follow Bonsai Factory.

You can read this story in Hindi here.

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Step by step guide to growing bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/step-by-step-guide-to-growing-bonsai/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/step-by-step-guide-to-growing-bonsai/ A bonsai plant the the art of bonsai has been practiced for generations and is a highly symbolic religious activity, with its vital qualities of simplicity, harmony and balance reflected in many parts of Japanese culture and way of life. Bonsai art […]]]>







A bonsai plant





the the art of bonsai has been practiced for generations and is a highly symbolic religious activity, with its vital qualities of simplicity, harmony and balance reflected in many parts of Japanese culture and way of life. Bonsai art has been cultivated for over 2000 years and is inspired by the Chinese art of Penjing, which was transferred to Japan from China, and later carved and influenced by the minimalist Buddhist culture.

So, for those of you who want to grow bonsai at home, here are the steps to grow them:












Step 1

Choose a tree species that suits your climate. Not all bonsai are the same. Many woody perennials and even tropical plants can be made into bonsai,

However, not all species will be suitable for your specific environment. It is essential to consider the climate in which the tree will be grown when choosing a species. Some trees, for example, perish in cold temperatures, while others need sub-freezing temperatures to enter a dormant state and prepare for spring.

One of those trees you can start with if you are new to bonsai growing. These hardy evergreens can be found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and even in the more temperate sections of the Southern Hemisphere.

Additionally, junipers are simple to grow; they respond well to pruning and other “training” efforts and, as evergreens, never shed their leaves. However, they are growing at a snail’s pace.

Pines, spruces and cedars of various types are also often grown as bonsai. Another option is deciduous (hardwood) trees.

2nd step

Decide if you want to grow your bonsai indoors or outdoors.

  • Indoor trees receive less moisture and sunlight, so choose only those that need it the least. Here are some of the trees that will be perfect if you want to grow a bonsai indoors, Hawaiian Umbrella, Serissa, Gardenia, Camellia, Kingsville Boxwood, Ficus.












  • Outdoor plants are those that may require a higher amount of humidity and sun. listed are some of these species of plants, juniper, cypress, cedar, maple, birch, beech, ginkgo, larch, elm.

Step 3

Select the size of your bonsai

Select a tree based on the size you can manage, as bonsai trees come in a wide variety of sizes. Depending on the species, mature trees can measure from 6 inches (15.2 cm) to 3 feet (0.9 m). If you choose to grow your bonsai from a seedling or cutting from another tree, it will start out much smaller. Larger plants require more water, soil and sun, so make sure you have everything you need before you buy.

Step 4

Select the pot

Bonsai is not a species of tree. However, its main appeal is that the trees are grown in pots which limit their growth. The most crucial consideration in determining which pot to use is that the container be large enough to allow adequate soil to cover the plant’s roots.












When you water your tree, the liquid from the soil is absorbed by the roots. You don’t want to put little soil in the pot so the tree roots can’t retain moisture. To prevent root rot, make sure your pot has one or more drainage holes in the bottom. You can also drill them yourself if you have a drill.

  • While your container should be large enough to support your tree, you’ll also want to keep your bonsai nice and tidy. Excessively huge pots could overshadow the tree, creating an odd or mismatched look. Buy a container large enough to accommodate the tree’s roots, but not much larger – the goal is for the pot to aesthetically complement the tree while being relatively unobtrusive visually.

  • Some people choose to start their bonsai trees in basic, functional pots and then transfer them to more sophisticated containers once they are fully grown. This is especially handy if your bonsai species is delicate, as it allows you to put off buying the “right” container until your tree is healthy and beautiful.

Step 5

Prune your tree to the shape you desire to ensure it grows the way you want it to.

Step 6

Learn about trees, their life cycle, and how much moisture and sun they want

Step 7

Uproot trees and clean their roots

Brush away clumps of dirt blocking your view as you clean out the roots. This method benefits from the use of root rakes, chopsticks, tweezers, and other similar equipment.












Step 8

pot the tree

Place the tree the right way up in your new pot. Finish filling the container with fine, well-drained soil or growing medium, making sure to cover the root system of the tree. You can add a final layer of moss or gravel if desired.






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How to care for bonsai – top tips for caring for compact plants https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-care-for-bonsai-top-tips-for-caring-for-compact-plants/ While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC. The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old. Although these beautiful […]]]>

While flowers may seem like an obvious choice for budding gardeners, bonsai trees can help add a sense of calm to your home. These plants have long been associated with the art of bonsai originating in China in 221 BC.

The ancient art of growing bonsai is over a thousand years old.

Although these beautiful trees are commonly associated with Japan, bonsai cultivation began in China, where they became associated with Zen Buddhism.

Shannen Godwin, spokesperson for JParker’s, said, “Bonsai is a living art form that results from the vision of replicating the natural growth and shape of trees, even on a much smaller scale.

“We have noticed that this technique has started to become more popular as people look to improve their skills and the appearance of their gardens.

READ MORE: When to prune a beech hedge: T When op tips and advice for hedge pruning

“It is important to learn that anyone can engage in this ancient practice and find comfort in it, because it is so much more than a variety of trees; it’s a way to bring many varieties to life.

Most Britons, when they think of bonsai, imagine a small potted tree kept in the corner of a living room.

But, some bonsai trees can and should be located outdoors. Here’s a guide to caring for these quiet plants.

How to choose your bonsai

There are many types of bonsai and not all types are the same.

Not all species will be adapted to the unpredictable UK climate.

In most cases it will be too cold to grow bonsai outside the UK.

Most Brits choose to grow bonsai indoors, these compact plants take up little space and can be grown in a container making them the perfect houseplant.

A popular bonsai species well suited to growing indoors is the Ficus, it is easy to grow for novice gardeners, so if you have recently started gardening this might be the perfect choice for you.

Other popular varieties include; Carmona Bonsai, Chinese Elm Bonsai, Crassula (Jade) Bonsai and Serissa Japonica (Snow Rose) Bonsai.

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How to take care of your bonsai

Instead, you should aim to discourage growth at the top of your bonsai, encouraging it to grow downwards.

Your tree should look full and mature on the lower branches and more spindly at the top.

A popular option is to choose a tree with an interesting trunk because the bonsai roots are visible.

The bonsai’s roots are as much a part of the plant’s display as its green foliage.

The branches of your tree will also require attention. They can be shaped in a pattern of choice or you can even shape the branches to grow from side to side.

This can be done by completely stripping the tree of its branches and then rubbing the buds from the side where growth is not desired.

How to water bonsai

These plants have very specific watering needs, to water your bonsai you should submerge the entire bonsai plant in a bucket of water whenever the topsoil seems completely dry. It’s usually about once a week.

Once you have completely submerged your tree in the bucket of water, wait until all air bubbles have risen to the top.

When this has happened, the bonsai has absorbed enough water and can be removed from the bucket.

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Jaya’s bonsai: A botanist and her bonsai garden | Kochi News https://rgbonsai.com/jayas-bonsai-a-botanist-and-her-bonsai-garden-kochi-news/ Wed, 26 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/jayas-bonsai-a-botanist-and-her-bonsai-garden-kochi-news/ Don’t throw away that little Banyan tree you find under your water tank or on a cracked wall, it could make a good bonsai,” advises Jaya P Nair, a bonsai enthusiast and secretary of the Kerala Bonsai Association. One is inclined to heed the advice because Raj Bhavan’s controller, Thiruvananthapuram, who is due to retire […]]]>
Don’t throw away that little Banyan tree you find under your water tank or on a cracked wall, it could make a good bonsai,” advises Jaya P Nair, a bonsai enthusiast and secretary of the Kerala Bonsai Association. One is inclined to heed the advice because Raj Bhavan’s controller, Thiruvananthapuram, who is due to retire at the end of this month, practices what she preaches.
Jaya is currently busy moving her 200 bonsai trees from Raj Bhavan’s comptroller’s quarters to her home in Maruthankuzhy, and even though the renovation is ongoing, she is making sure her bonsai trees get all the comforts they need. And why not, she has been growing them for 25 years.
These days, after work, she rushes into her Bonsai garden and takes each pot and places them with great care on specially designed iron supports on her balcony. “I don’t want their surroundings disturbed too much as I only recently moved them from the space they have adapted for 25 years. One of the plants died because of it,” she says. Jaya’s bonsai collection largely includes Indian varieties of Ficus species as they are easier to grow in the tropical climate of Kerala. “They adapt easily because they need less water and sun to grow.”

Jaya’s love for bonsai first blossomed when she attended an exhibition in Kanakakunnu in the late 90s. seduced by Bonsai and its greenery. I was also inspired by my friends, who are bonsai lovers and that’s how I started collecting my own plants. It’s hard at first, but you learn to be patient, just to see the plants grow,” says Jaya, who also owns foreign plants such as Beggars Bowl, Baobab, Candle Tree and the ornamental Pony Tail Palm.
While she says Bonsai gardening can be expensive, she explains, “We could get a Bonsai from `500. One is enough if you like the plant. You can prune its small branches and create one yourself in a pot. One can even grow the parasitic plants found in cracked walls or on tall trees as a Bonsai plant. In this way, we also promote green living. I would like to give away the stems for free to those who would like to make their own bonsai.
Bonsai cultivation could also be a new way to enhance greenery in urban buildings, she says.
“We now have space constraints in the apartments. Thus, growing even two bonsai on the balcony is enough to start a green life.
On the process of growing a Bonsai plant, she says, “Feeding a Bonsai plant is similar to growing life-size plants. It can take years to see the plant turn into a good bonsai as it follows its natural life cycle. The taproots are initially cut and we feed the surface roots of the tree species resulting in a miniature version of the plant.

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A Bonsai plant should always be grown in one of three triangular shapes – acute, obtuse and scalene, she says. “Add mud, sand and manure in equal proportions. For manure, neem cake or dilute cow dung can be used which would help them grow fast and healthy. More importantly, keep in mind that Bonsai is not a houseplant.
Jaya, whose plan is to spread bonsai cultivation in the state, is excited about her life after retirement. “I want to focus more on my Bonsai gardening and for the next six months I will be busy with them. I can guarantee that if you can grow a Bonsai plant, you will become patient, develop perseverance and achieve peace of mind. mind. I had been through a lot of professional and personal stress and what helped me keep my mind clear through it all was my bonsai trees. Highly recommend this to the younger generation, especially boys, because it will help them to become tolerant, responsible and control their hot temper which is often seen in most men these days.
Photo courtesy: Satheeshan Karicheri
look A botanist and her bonsai garden

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This Kumta Tree Maker Has Hundreds of Bonsai Beauties – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection. Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a […]]]>

Express press service

KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection.

Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a philosophy, of nature itself. Bonsai is the art of growing miniature trees in pots, where the plants take on the shape and scale of a full-sized tree. This art was developed by the Japanese. People, especially those who face a lack of space in their homes and cannot grow large trees like the banyan tree, have opted for bonsai trees which can be grown in small pots on their patios, outdoors. inside or outside their homes, or even on the stairs. These bonsai trees can be kept alive for over a hundred years. There are those that are over 1,000 years old in the world.

Lakshminarayana R Hegde, 62, the rangeland forest officer, retired from the forest service about four years ago. Before that, he had planned to spend his retirement life setting up a small bonsai garden in his home. And since then, he began to soak up information about growing bonsai in order to fulfill his dream.

After his retirement, he settled in his village of Kallabbe, located about 11 km from the town of Kumta, Uttara Kannada. Next to his house, on a small plot, he developed a bonsai garden named “Kubjavruksha Kalaniketana”. The garden has 36 types of more than 220 bonsai trees.

Hegde says many people dream of having their own garden or a plantation of tall trees near their house. Due to a space problem, they are forced to give up. “Therefore, I decided to use my knowledge of tree conservation that I acquired during my service as a forest officer and educate people on how to grow bonsai at home. Keeping green in and around the house is also good for people and nature,” he says.

He also leads workshops in schools and colleges on the different techniques. ), apart from the cultivation of medicinal and commercial plants. He suggests people grow bonsai according to their zodiac sign as it is widely believed that it will give them good health.

In his garden, the miniature trees have formal and informal shapes, vertical, inclined, etc. Some trees look like groves and others cascade. He gave his trees the shape of a heart, an animal, a human, Lord Ganesha, etc. Most of them are banyan trees. After collecting trees from various places, such as old buildings or forest areas, he cuts the roots and branches to shape them. Over a period of time, the bonsai grows in shape and attracts people. There is a huge market for these trees.
He believes bonsai cultivation is not just a science, it’s an art. “We have to provide water, fertilizer and follow the scientific growth of the trees. At the same time, you can shape trees, so it’s an art,” he says.

MAKING PANS
Hegde does not buy the necessary pots for growing bonsai. He makes his own pots using household items like a bucket, containers, and sometimes cement. He says he hardly invests in any hardware. Its pots vary in shapes like round, square, triangle, hexagon, a boat, etc. He says he must spend a lot of money if he had to buy such different shaped pots and carry them home.

BECOMING ORGANIC
Kallabbe is surrounded by forests in the Western Ghats. This is why Hegde collects the dry leaves and prepares organic fertilizers. He did not use any chemical fertilizers for the bonsai. He advocates organic fertilizers because they give lasting strength to any plant. He spends about 4 hours a day to make and maintain his garden.

HIS COLLECTION
Some bonsai garden trees Calotropis procera, Ficus religiosa, Achyranthes aspera, Ficus racemosa, Butea monosperma, Acacia catechu, Cynodon dactylon, Prosopis cenneraria, Imperata cylindrica

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How to train your bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-train-your-bonsai/ Fri, 29 Mar 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-train-your-bonsai/ Bonsai master Hal Sasaki. Photo by Theo Stroomer House Growing a bonsai tree isn’t as difficult as you think, says this Denver bonsai master. By Joe Lindsey March 29, 2019 Harold Sasaki wants to dispel some myths about bonsai: that they are difficult to grow, for example. “Most often a bonsai tree dies from lack […]]]>
Bonsai master Hal Sasaki. Photo by Theo Stroomer

House

Growing a bonsai tree isn’t as difficult as you think, says this Denver bonsai master.


Harold Sasaki wants to dispel some myths about bonsai: that they are difficult to grow, for example. “Most often a bonsai tree dies from lack of light,” he says. “So maybe you just put it in the wrong place.” Sasaki, who is 82 and goes by Hal, hears many such failure stories; he has several, especially since he started his teenage years in Hawaii. One of Denver’s most prominent bonsai masters, he has co-taught beginner’s bonsai classes ($105) at the Denver Botanical Garden for over 40 years, and also teaches and sells trees through his own business. , Colorado Bonsai ($150, one class smaller). His main goal: to make bonsai accessible, not intimidating.

Bonsai (say: bone-sai) is the ancient Japanese art of growing tiny trees in pots; the term bonsai literally means planted in a container. Contrary to popular belief, bonsai trees are not genetically dwarf varieties; they are of the same species as their full-sized brethren. Bonsai enthusiasts train or shape the trees – using techniques such as careful pruning or wiring the branches to grow in a certain way – into the shape of a life-size tree in miniature. The results can be amazing, with patient work. But they are surprisingly resilient plants, if you give them a fighting chance (a ficus bonsai in Italy is over 1,000 years old). The key, says Sasaki, is to treat them for what they are: trees, not ornaments.

“One of the big misconceptions about bonsai trees is that they grow differently from their natural large-leaved form,” says Sasaki. “So people put them on a low table, because it’s better there. They treat the plant like it’s made of silk and forget that it’s alive and growing and needs a certain amount of light. You have to make things grow where they have to grow.

(Learn more about Harold “Hal” Sasaki.)

Ideally, this means a sheltered but sunny location outdoors, at least in warm weather (in Colorado, bonsai cannot be left potted in the winter). But Sasaki knows that growing bonsai outdoors is impractical or impossible for many people, especially apartment and condo dwellers. So, for his practical lessons – students go home with a tree – he tries to select species that are more suitable for growing indoors all year round.

The smaller the leaf size, Sasaki says, the more light a bonsai tree needs. Ironically, this rules out many native pine and juniper species for most indoor environments. Sasaki’s must-have bonsai tree for beginners in Colorado? Portulacaria afra, aka Dwarf Jade, a succulent with thick leaves the size of a penny. “I use it to make students more likely to succeed,” he says. Dwarf Jade, native to South Africa, also tolerates the constant warm temperatures of indoor growing better than native conifers, which like cooler nights. These long-lived ficuses are another good choice for indoors.

Sasaki says he tries to give as much basic horticultural advice and care as possible in his classes, so students understand not just what to do, but why. To water, Sasaki fills a tray large enough for the entire pot, then submerges the plant past the edge of the pot and leaves it there until the air bubbles stop. This, he says, completely wets the root zone and he doesn’t water again until the plant is nearly dry.

Most importantly, if something isn’t working, he says, change it. Move the plant to a different location with more light. Or water less, not more. “People often say their tree died because they overwatered it,” he says. “And I say to them, ‘If you think you overwatered it, then why did you keep doing it’?”

What enabled Sasaki to teach for four decades? “I want other people to benefit from what I’ve had for all these years,” he says. “I try to make it as resilient as possible for them and demystify it. I want to tell people what joy you can get from these plants. The rewards are there to make your heart happy.

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Bonsai gardening is making inroads https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-gardening-is-making-inroads/ Mon, 17 Sep 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-gardening-is-making-inroads/ People, in recent times, are drawn to bonsai breeding due to the lack of gardening space with increasing urbanization. Plant lovers in Vijayawada are also turning to bonsai horticulture these days. With greater awareness of gardening and horticulture and with the development of international standards, gardening enthusiasts are growing plants in all possible places available […]]]>

People, in recent times, are drawn to bonsai breeding due to the lack of gardening space with increasing urbanization. Plant lovers in Vijayawada are also turning to bonsai horticulture these days.

With greater awareness of gardening and horticulture and with the development of international standards, gardening enthusiasts are growing plants in all possible places available in homes.

Vertical gardens and rooftop gardens are some of the options chosen to give homes more elegance these days. In the recent past, people have shifted from vertical and rooftop gardening to planting bonsai, which brings grace and beauty to homes.

Bonsai plants are attractive and create a healthy atmosphere in the house. Naturally, locals make room for bonsai plants in their homes.

Amaravati Bonsai Society (ABS) President Amrita Kumar, speaking to Womenia, said ABS is the first of its kind in Andhra Pradesh. She said, “Bonsai gardening is a Japanese technique that is spreading all over the country and requires a lot of patience and skill.

The company was formed to educate people and train them to prepare bonsai with very minimal soil, which would fit in a small pot. Due to the lack of space, people can have a miniature of a large tree inside the house, which was smaller than a bush.

She said her interest in forming a bonsai society in Vijayawada grew after attending a bonsai exhibit at a horticulture exhibition in Hyderabad. Visitors to the exhibition expressed interest in knowing how to grow bonsai and adopting it as a livelihood option, which prompted her to start a company in Vijayawada when she moved.

She formed the society with 25 members. She said that Vijayawada is a happening place these days and that they would regularly hold awareness programs and classes on bonsai gardening to educate farmers on using the bonsai nursery as a livelihood program.

Amaravati Bonsai Society led by its President Amrita Kumar, Vice President Yerneni Padmaja, Secretary Pathi Naga Lakshmi, Deputy Secretary – Gamini Suneetha, Treasurer Durga Sowjanya Kancherla and one of the members, Dr Neelima, are actively involved in bonsai gardening activities.

She said the cost of the plant ranges from 1,500 rupees to over a lakh depending on the rare variety, size and age of the bonsai. These bonsai plants are placed in shopping complexes, malls, offices and homes nowadays.

There are a variety of bonsai plants and the ones that are readily available include Phycus, Boganvilias, Temple Trees, Edenium, Tamarind and all kinds of fruit plants, wild forest plants, flowering plants, Peepal, Banyan, Umbar, Christmas Tree, Silver Oak, Rose, Bakul and many more.

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Bonsai Tips From an Atlanta Master https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-tips-from-an-atlanta-master/ Thu, 08 Feb 2018 06:16:14 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-tips-from-an-atlanta-master/ Photography by iStockphoto.com Translated from Japanese, bonsai simply means a tree in a pot. However, the techniques used to grow such a plant are a bit more complex. “Bonsai is the art of making a tree look older,” says Rodney Clemons, nationally respected bonsai master and teacher at Stone Mountain. Each planting tells nature’s story […]]]>
Photography by iStockphoto.com

Translated from Japanese, bonsai simply means a tree in a pot. However, the techniques used to grow such a plant are a bit more complex. “Bonsai is the art of making a tree look older,” says Rodney Clemons, nationally respected bonsai master and teacher at Stone Mountain. Each planting tells nature’s story in miniature, evoking living oak trees twisted by ocean winds or maple trees reaching skyward through snowdrifts.

Tropical varieties are best suited indoors, but native species are often easier to grow, Clemons notes. Evergreens are the most conventional, but deciduous trees make great bonsai trees, especially when their leaves change color in the fall.

Smith-Gilbert Gardens in Kennesaw, a 16-acre public botanical garden, features one of the region’s best bonsai collections, renovated this year. (Clemons manages both Smith-Gilbert and a garden at the Monastery of the Holy Spirit in Conyers.)

Although big box retailers may sell bonsai (aka “con-sai”), Clemons recommends purchasing plants from specialty nurseries such as Monastery of the Holy Spirit, Full Moon Bonsai in Marietta, Plant City Bonsai in Clermont or Allgood Bonsai from Clemons. at Stone Mountain.

You can find small bonsai trees for as low as $25, but Clemons says beginners should opt for more established trees 12 to 18 inches tall (usually $75 to $125). Ficus and juniper are two varieties that are relatively easy to grow, he says.

Bonsai is 80 to 90 percent horticulture, and the rest is art and technique, Clemons says. The practice teaches how plants feed, grow and respond to climate.

Contrary to popular belief, bonsai trees are not always dwarf specimens. They are often regular species trained to produce small leaves by techniques such as manual defoliation and timely pruning of branches and roots. Many trees and shrubs can be trained, even magnolias, oaks and azaleas. Amazingly, tiny fruit trees will produce full-sized flowers and fruit: a 12-inch-tall apple tree will produce full-sized apples.

To be involved: Atlanta Bonsai Society has flourished since 1963 and offers many opportunities for bonsai studies, performances and workshops. Find the company at JapanFest at the Gwinnett Center on September 19-20.

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2015 issue of HOUSE of Atlanta Magazine.

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Make Bonsai Your Home’s Best Friend https://rgbonsai.com/make-bonsai-your-homes-best-friend/ Thu, 15 Sep 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/make-bonsai-your-homes-best-friend/ Finding a balance between the contradictory need to live in the city and the love of nature is a constant struggle. But you can successfully pull it off, albeit on a miniature scale. You can achieve this with the oriental art of “bonsai”, which, at first glance, arouses curiosity and admiration. In ancient times, the […]]]>

Finding a balance between the contradictory need to live in the city and the love of nature is a constant struggle. But you can successfully pull it off, albeit on a miniature scale. You can achieve this with the oriental art of “bonsai”, which, at first glance, arouses curiosity and admiration.

In ancient times, the Chinese believed that those who could take care of a miniature tree for a long time obtained eternity for their soul. Supposedly, for them, a tree could be the link between the divine and the human, between heaven and earth. However, it was the Japanese who advanced the art and made it popular.

How to start
Bonsai trees are not genetically dwarf plants; they are kept small by a series of techniques and steps that, if done correctly, would allow the tree to live as long as its parent species. The good thing here is that any tree can be grown as a bonsai. All you have to do is take care of it and know a few details before you start. So where to start ?

First, choose a tree you like and match it to your home, environment and climate conditions. Remember to consider the size of the tree’s leaves for optimal growth. People like to pick up a tree with small leaves because it is easier to model.

One way is to buy a young plant, called “prebonsai”, which consists of a sprouted tree that is in its infancy. This way, the whole bonsai process becomes faster. You may be able to buy seeds for a plant and grow them bonsai style. Or you can take the easier route: buy a cultivated bonsai tree and take good care of it. However, this option takes away the fun and opportunity to learn how to grow bonsai. Know that there are no “bonsai seeds”. So, don’t fall prey to buying bonsai seeds.

The seed from which a bonsai comes is just an ordinary tree seed. The process of making a bonsai comes later, after its germination. When you grow a bonsai from seed, you should plant it in the fall, so that it starts to sprout in the spring. It is always best to select trees that can adapt easily to the climate of where you live; this way it will work in your favor.

To take care
“Looking at a tree in miniature form is a completely different feeling. The bonsai trees in my house are not only an attractive conversation starter, but caring for them is a great stress reliever,” says Delhi-based plant enthusiast Swapna Soni .Pruning is one of the ways to create and shape a bonsai.However, when pruning, it is very important not to change the original silhouette of the tree too much.Constant pruning is necessary not only for shaping the tree, but also to take care of it.

Regular wiring ensures an abundant bonsai with strong and numerous leaves. “The shaping of angles and the generation of branches can be done by wiring. However, it is very important to do it correctly, as it can be a disaster if not done correctly. If two branches are at the same height of the tree, keep one of them and delete the other. Remove branches with unnatural twists. Also remove disproportionately thick branches from the top of the tree,” says Delhi-based bonsai specialist Shalini Vohra.

Pruning takes care of two aspects – keeping the trees miniaturized and returning a good shape. The ultimate goal is to create a bonsai that resembles its natural form as closely as possible. Spring and summer are the seasons for pruning. However, this will depend on the type of tree you have.

A good concave knife is what you need to make sure hollow wounds stay
behind heal much better than those left by normal cutters. However, if this is not easy, hire an experienced horticulturist or gardener. Keep some basic things in mind, such as removing disproportionately thick branches from the top of the tree.

Another important technique for shaping trees is wiring. By carefully wrapping anodized aluminum or annealed copper around the branches, it is possible to bend and shape them to at least some extent. Wiring can be applied year-round, but be sure to remove the wire before it begins to scar the branches that are getting thicker.

These are not the only ways to maintain a bonsai. Some methods include defoliating the tree to get smaller leaves or to balance out its shape.

Then there is also the ‘jin and shari’ technique which gives the bonsai an aged and mature look by creating areas of dead wood on the tree, as sometimes occurs in nature.

Necessary care
Bonsai require constant love and attention; caring for them can also help develop patience. “Indoor bonsai trees add beauty, help purify the air, and add freshness to the living space,” says Swapna. Constantly check the bonsai soil and keep it moist. Water, if it becomes dry on top, but be sure not to flood it. If you plan to repot your bonsai, simply remove it from the old pot and carefully transfer it to the new one.

Make sure you don’t keep your bonsai in a dark corner. It needs enough sun, water and air to thrive. Check the humidity and temperature of where the jar is kept. Subtropical trees grow best in climates like that of India. They can also be grown outdoors as they can withstand all weather changes.

When selecting a bonsai for your home, it is always wise to choose a tree native to your environment. To guarantee their optimal growth, there are fertilizers suitable for bonsai on the market. In addition to these, you can also use the regular bonsai fertilizers. Remember to always check for pests and fungal growth. If you notice growth, stop it at the very beginning.

Anyone who loves plants and nature clearly has a compassionate nature and raising a bonsai tree yourself further strengthens this bond. As long as you love your plant, it will stay with you and stay healthy too. Remember that growing a bonsai is not a race or a destination. It’s an endless journey.

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Bonsai – an overview and list of plants suitable for bonsai in the Indian climate https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-an-overview-and-list-of-plants-suitable-for-bonsai-in-the-indian-climate/ Fri, 18 Jun 2010 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-an-overview-and-list-of-plants-suitable-for-bonsai-in-the-indian-climate/ “Bonsai is actually two words, ‘Bon’ and ‘Sai’. The word ‘Bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘Sai’ means ‘growth’ or ‘plantation’. Therefore, the two words put together give you the translation of “tray culture” or “tray planting”. When you say the word “Bonsai” to people, they usually think of a type of tree. However, this art form […]]]>

“Bonsai is actually two words, ‘Bon’ and ‘Sai’. The word ‘Bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘Sai’ means ‘growth’ or ‘plantation’. Therefore, the two words put together give you the translation of “tray culture” or “tray planting”. When you say the word “Bonsai” to people, they usually think of a type of tree. However, this art form is actually a way to cultivate many different species of plants and trees – Erik Olsen, author of Bonsai Gardening Secrets

One theory about the beginning of bonsai is that its roots actually originated in India. Ancient Ayurvedic physicians returned from the Himalayas with medical tree saplings. By growing them in pots, cutting off their branches and cutting off the roots, they were able to preserve the trees in miniature form. Tulsi is a good example.

In the 12th century, bonsai was known as Vamanatanu Vrikshadi Vidya in India, which translates to the science of dwarf trees. The practice traveled to China and became known as pun-sai – the art of growing single specimen trees in pots. Various tree species have been grown with thick, gnarled trunks in pots. With its introduction to Japan, the art was further refined and took on a different form over time. Bonsai artists gradually introduced other materials like rocks and figurines, with additional and accent plants creating miniature landscapes in nature, known as sai-kei. Finally, in the middle of the 19th century, when Japan opened its doors to the rest of the world, bonsai reached Europe through exhibitions. After about a hundred years, this art returned to India in its present form. However, there are also other conflicting theories.

Banyan

People who grow bonsai for various reasons are different from people who are simply looking for an interesting plant and a treat is a centerpiece. The bonsai requires a lot of perseverance and must be maintained a lot. One thing to keep in mind is that bonsai is meant to be an outdoor plant, not an indoor plant, although since the 1990s it has increasingly become an item of interior decoration. Different types of plants are used for indoor bonsai trees as opposed to outdoors, so it is important to place the tree in the appropriate location.

Bonsai growers acquire these trees in different ways – either by using methods such as cutting, air layering and grafting from already existing trees, or by purchasing seeds for planting.

If you want to try your hand at bonsai, the first thing to do is get your hands on some great resources for soil, fertilizer, water, pots, and more.

Many people enjoy growing bonsai nowadays. There is something very mystical about them and they are very beautiful too. Bonsai cultivation is seen more as an art form and a skill that should be developed over time.

Trees for beginners

If you’re just starting out, it’s best to stick with certain tree types suitable for beginners and ideal for Indian conditions.

Starter Kits

Beginners can take a look at bonsai starter kits which contain a sapling, container, training wire, soil, rocks and instructions.

Bonsai pruning

To keep a bonsai nice and small, there are a few things you need to do. The first thing is to prune it. How you prune will depend on the individual tree and the shape you want.

Cut the roots

It is also necessary to prune the roots from time to time. This is because trees are naturally meant to be grown in the ground where there is plenty of room for the roots to spread. When growing a tree in a container, the roots can easily outgrow the container. So they will have to be pruned

Below is a list of plants suitable for the Indian climate:

BOTANICAL NAME FAMILY COMMON NAME
Ficus Bengalensis Moraceae vad
Ficus riligiosa Moraceae pipal
Ficus glomerulata Moraceae Umbar
ficus Carrica Moraceae Anjir
Mangifera indica Anacardiaceae Mango
Bouhinia Varigata Cesalpine Kanchan
Acacia Nilotica mimosa Babul
Prosopis Juliflora mimosa Vilayati Babul
Pithocolobium dulci mimosa Vilayati Tamarind
Tamarindus indica Cesalpine Vilayati Tamarind
Auracauria cuci Auraeauriaceae Christmas tree
Morus alba Moraceae Shahtout
Jacaranda mimosifolia mimosa Neel Mohor
Gravellia robusta Myrtaceae silver oak
Malphighia caccigera Malphighiaceae Malphighia
Citrus lemon Rutaceae Lime
auricular citrus Rutaceae Mosambi
Duranta varigata Verbenaceae Duranta
Bougainvillea Spectabilis Nyctaginaeae Bougainvell
petria volubilis Verbenaceae Petrie
species of bamboo Grasses Bamboo
Achrus Sapote Sapotaceae Chikoo
Mimosops eleing Sapotaceae Bakul
Eugenia Jamboliana Myrtaceae jambul
Feronia Elephantum Rutaceae Kavath
carrisa carrandus Apocynaceae Karvand
Pinus sylvestre Pinaceae Pine
Calistemon lanceolatus Myrtaceae Batlicha kuncha
Terminalia chabla Combretaceae Hirda
cassia siamia Caesalpinaceae red mohor
Cassia fistula Caesalpinaceae Amal heap
Board Delonix Cesalpines Gulmohor
Psidium guava Myrtaceae Guava
Butea Monosperma Butterflies Palas
Lagerostoimla sp Lethraceae pink pahadi
Lausonia inermis Lethraceae Mehndi
elastic ficus Moracrcées Rubber
Euphorbia nesifolia Euphorbiaceae Vajratundi
Exotic Muraa Rutaceae din ka raja
Nyctanthus arborticus Nyctanthaceae Parisat
Punica granatum Punicaceae Anaar
Casurina equisetifolia Casurinaceae Suru
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