high school http://rgbonsai.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:42:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png high school http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Here are all the Cobra Kai filming locations https://rgbonsai.com/here-are-all-the-cobra-kai-filming-locations/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 18:01:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/here-are-all-the-cobra-kai-filming-locations/ Cobra Kai is Netflix’s hit drama based on 1980s martial arts films the Karate Kid franchise. For kids growing up in Gen X in the United States, the Karate Kid was a cultural touchstone in pop culture for millions. Cobra Kai brought back combat for The Valley for a whole new generation, with even more […]]]>

Cobra Kai is Netflix’s hit drama based on 1980s martial arts films the Karate Kid franchise. For kids growing up in Gen X in the United States, the Karate Kid was a cultural touchstone in pop culture for millions. Cobra Kai brought back combat for The Valley for a whole new generation, with even more complex storytelling than ever before. Creators Josh Heald, Jon Hurwitz, and Hayden Schlossberg are all big fans of the original movies and brought that fandom to the show. In the last 4 seasons of the serieswe saw OG Karate Kid the characters return in a way that most longtime fans never thought possible before. Actors Ralph Macchio, William Zabka, Martin Kove, Thomas Ian Griffith, Elisabeth Shue and others all reprized their original roles. At the same time, a whole new group of fighters were introduced to the cast, including actors Xolo Maridueña, Jacob Bertrand, Tanner Buchanan, Mary Mouser and Peyton List. With season 5 already filmed and wrapped in December 2021, a season 6 (possibly final) anticipated and possible Cobra Kai spin-off shows discussed, there’s still a lot to look forward to for the characters of Daniel LaRusso, Johnny Lawrence, and the ensemble cast.

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Have you ever wondered where they film Cobra Kai corn? We know the original The Karate Kid was based in Los Angeles, California in the Reseda neighborhood. Most of the original Karate Kid The film was actually shot around Los Angeles, apart from some work done in Arizona and New Jersey. The second Karate Kid the film was not shot in Okinawa, Japan (contrary to popular belief), and Karate Kid 3 returned to Los Angeles for filming. These days, other parts of the world have become prime filming locations for movies and TV shows. Cobra Kai made one of these areas their main filming center, however, they were always able to shoot in other Karate Kid-related parts of the world where warranted. Although all the places where Cobra Kai was filmed is officially confirmed, the vast majority have been and are now well documented online. However, there is a few more facts that have never been discussed in detail until now. Let’s take a closer look at everything Cobra Kaimain filming locations.


Related: 5 Predictions For Cobra Kai Season 5

Greater Atlanta, Georgia area


Carrie Underwood, William Zabka
netflix

Atlanta is the home of Cobra Kai and was so throughout its run. However, many of the show’s key scenes were shot in the surrounding Atlanta towns of Marietta, Union City, Fayetteville, Peachtree City, Conyers, Decatur, Sandy Springs, Austell, Roswell, Lithia Springs, Duluth, and East Point, in Georgia. Much of the series was also shot in locations open to the public. For example, the Cobra Kai The location of the dojo is at the Crossroads Mall in Atlanta. The convenience store next to the dojo is also there. However, if you were to stop by when filming is not in progress, you would barely recognize the location as all signs related to the show are removed and the area where filming is taking place usually has the windows covered and the locked doors.


Although an occasional exterior scene of the dojo may still be filmed there, most filming of the dojo has been moved to the show’s production studio in West Atlanta. It was reported that the name of the studio is Gray Studios, however, an internet search will yield nothing by that name. The main Cobra Kai filming studio was deliberately kept secret, presumably for the safety of the cast and crew. It should be noted that the Miyagi-Do dojo is located in the parking lot of this production studio and is not open to visitors. Actor Ralph Macchio owns the yellow 1947 Super DeLuxe convertible from the original films (he received it as a gift many years ago) and the actual car often appears on location for filming at Miyagi-Do.

Besides their main filming locations, the show sometimes uses other local locations to put their trailers, set up their catering, and more. when filming outside their studio. One such location was used in Season 4 at Lithia Springs High School in Georgia. Various cast members have posted photos of themselves on social media hanging out with each other backstage at their gis there. They are only allowed to share these types of photos once the final season airs on Netflix so as not to give away any spoilers ahead of time. The actors wore their gis for the last All-Valley Tournament which took place at the end of the season. Singer Carrie Underwood was a special guest on the show in Season 4 and appears in some of the cast photos outside of school. The show also uses local vendors for some of its sets, apparently renting bonsai trees from Plant City Bonsai in Clermont, GA during seasons 1 and 2. Another interesting note about the show is the house used as the family’s home. LaRusso during Season 3. sold for $2.4 million in February 2022. Therefore, any scenes in the LaRusso household from now on will likely be filmed elsewhere.


Okinawa, Japan


Why Cobra Kai Season 3 Had To Revisit The Karate Kid Part II And Its Legacy
netflix

Karate Kid Part 2 was supposed to be based here, but the movie was actually shot on the island of Oahu in Hawaii. It was probably easier to stay in the US for the production team and both regions had a similar feel that worked for the film. The second Karate Kid the film starred Ralph Macchio (Daniel), Pat Morita (Mr. Miyagi), Yuji Okumoto (Chosen), and Tamlyn Tomita (Kumiko). Okumoto and Tomita reprized their roles in Cobra Kaiwith Okumoto (as Chosen) looking to play a big part in Season 5. Pat Morita sadly passed away in 2005. The team behind Cobra Kai made the decision to go all the way to Okinawa for a week of filming during Season 3, making this Daniel LaRusso’s first real trip to Okinawa. The landscape scenes between Daniel and Chosen by themselves would have been filmed there. That being said, other scenes, including Kumiko, were actually filmed in Atlanta, but were also described as being in Okinawa.

Related: Cobra Kai Star Teases Kreese’s Revenge In Season 5

The Greater Los Angeles Area, California


Miguel-and-Johnny-in-their-apartment
netflix

A few key locations have been revisited in California to Cobra Kai, including Daniel’s former South Seas apartment complex from the original film in Reseda. Exterior shots of Johnny’s Cobra Kai apartment complex were also filmed in Tarzana, California. However, the main courtyard of the show’s apartment for Johnny and his student Miguel’s apartments are filmed on a soundstage in Georgia. Some Cobra Kai scenes in cars were also shot in California, such as when Johnny first sees Daniel’s car dealership billboard in the show’s first episode and another when Johnny and Miguel are hanging out together. Even with the vast majority of the show filmed in Georgia, California is still the fictional location of competing dojos Cobra Kai, Eagle Fang, and Miyagi-Do each season.



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This banker has 550 trees on his terrace! https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-banker-has-550-trees-on-his-terrace/ MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s. This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. […]]]>

MAngat Singh Thakur, an 80-year-old retired banker from Rohini, Delhi, was in his 40s when bonsai was first introduced to India in the late 1970s.

This, he notes, was thanks to the efforts of Nikunj and Jyoti Parekh, who founded the Bonsai Study Group of the Indo-Japanese Association. A few years later, he says, Dr. Leila Dhanda popularized the art form in the capital by founding the Indian Bonsai Association. “And I was lucky enough to come across a group of women who worked for her, in a vegetable garden that I frequented,” he says.

“I didn’t even know what a bonsai was at the time, and oddly enough, they didn’t really have a clue either. However, they walked me through the basics and I attended my first workshop at the (ITC) Maurya Sheraton soon after. I come from very humble beginnings and was hesitant to even enter the hotel premises. But as I learned more about how to grow bonsai at home, I only became more interested in the art,” he adds.

Despite his inclinations, Mangat’s work and family responsibilities kept him busy until 2001. Then, as a retired man, he was finally able to devote most of his days to perfecting a green thumb and cultivates currently up to 550 bonsai trees on its roof. terrace in Rohini.

“About 35 years ago, I potted my first bonsai, a banyan tree. I still have it today. In the early years, I spent hours meditating on books on bonsai techniques. But of the dozens of books available in my neighborhood libraries, only a few were written in Hindi. I decided that if I ever had the chance, I would write one myself. And now I am, ”says Mangat The best India.

Since 2019, he has also been sharing detailed video tutorials on growing and caring for the exotic plant on Bonsai Factory, his YouTube channel with nearly 9,000 subscribers.

“For the past few years, my main focus has been to bring bonsai techniques to the common man across the country. If we introduce it to marginalized farmers in rural and remote areas, they can make good use of their existing land and resources to establish a highly profitable model. With my videos, [I hope] they can at least discover that they have the possibility to do it and find out how to start,” he adds.

Although Mangat has finished writing his book, he says the accompanying photographs and illustrations are not yet complete, adding that he is planning a release in April next year.

“More a work of art than hard work”

“The best thing about growing bonsai is that you don’t need any special seeds to start with. You can use any plant that has the ability to grow into a tree,” he notes. Here, ‘bon’ means ‘plateau’ and ‘sai’ means ‘tree’, so it is not a separate species, but rather a miniature form of a larger tree. Yet, I find it really fascinating that the fruit of bonsai is the same size as a tree.

“People often make growing bonsai a time-consuming and expensive affair. But it’s more of a work of art than hard work. If you spend time understanding the basics of feeding a bonsai tree, you can make one easily and ensure that it will survive for decades,” he says.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Mangat has also started taking online courses to raise awareness of bonsai cultivation techniques. He says the sessions are priced at Rs 5,000 per participant for a 15-day batch, and they focus only on theoretical concepts for the first 10.

“Even a doctor spends two-thirds of his life buried in books. I don’t claim to be able to make anyone master the subject in two weeks, but enough is learned to pursue it with consideration. I have taught over 150 people so far, from high school students to managers, pilots and engineers. I am proud to do this work at 80 years old,” he shares.

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How to make bonsai soil:

Mangat points out that the first thing to keep in mind when growing bonsai trees is that their maximum height is only three feet. “They are grown in a confined space and in limited soil, so their roots don’t spread like large trees and require more nutrition through the soil,” he says.

“There are a lot of things to consider when preparing the soil. It should be light, but rich in nutrients at the same time,” says Mangat. “For this you can combine 15% nursery soil, 10% manure, 3% neem cake fertilizer, 4-5% chalk, 10% pit sand (badarpur), 5% brick chunks, 5% raw charcoal chunks, 2% ash-based fertilizer, 10% coir dust, 10% bone meal and 15% dry leaves. You can also add a few pieces of rotten wood to spice up the mix.

After mixing these ingredients well, Mangat says, you have to pass the mixture through three types of sieves with different sizes of holes. “After straining the potting mix through the first sieve, any large stones or twigs that remain should be kept separately in a plastic container. This is the first type of soil,” he adds.

After filtering the remaining soil, pass it through the second sieve. Remove the soil that remains in this sieve and store it in another container – this is the second type of soil.

Now the soil you get after sieving through the second sieve should be sieved through the third sieve. Soil that does not filter through the third sieve is the third type of soil. After filtering, the remaining fine soil is the fourth type of soil.

Soils should not be stored in polythene, but rather collected in separate utensils or containers and dried in the sun. “We need thick clay for bonsai. If we keep its floor in polyethylene, then moisture gets in and the floor begins to break. One should also avoid mixing any type of chemicals into the bonsai soil, as this will shorten its lifespan,” Mangat explains.

Before planting bonsai in a pot, you must first put the “thick soil” – the first type of soil. After that, the second type of soil should be added, then the third, and the layers should be pressed tightly with your hands. Do not completely fill the jar.

Now place the bonsai there. Add more soil and press it down using any wood. Now place the bonsai in a tub or bucket filled with water. After leaving it in water for three to four hours, place the bonsai in a shady spot.

Other bonsai care tips:

  • Mangat says that watering bonsai trees is also a work of art. You cannot add as much water to it as other trees. Keep in mind that you are giving water in such a way that it does not stay in the pot at all. Bonsai roots are small, and if there is stagnation of water in the pot, the roots start to get damaged, he notes.
  • Avoid giving any type of chemical fertilizer; it is recommended to use only organic manure in bonsai.
  • Don’t apply too much fertilizer at one time. You can apply small amounts of manure at weekly intervals per month, three to four times. It makes bonsai healthier.
  • The wires are used to make bonsai. Therefore, you should also keep checking if a wire periodically damages the bonsai. If you feel the wire is cutting the bonsai, you can remove the wire and restructure it again.
  • Bonsai need to be pruned and “repotted” regularly, says Mangat.
  • After you start repotting, you don’t need to fertilize the bonsai for about a month, he adds. Then you can give the plant liquid manure, only in the evening. In addition to the roots, the bonsai leaves should also be sprayed.

For more information, you can follow Bonsai Factory.

You can read this story in Hindi here.

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Police union president says Pittsburgh officers’ Taser training ‘one of the best’ News, Sports, Weather, Traffic & Best of Pittsburgh https://rgbonsai.com/police-union-president-says-pittsburgh-officers-taser-training-one-of-the-best-news-sports-weather-traffic-best-of-pittsburgh/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/police-union-president-says-pittsburgh-officers-taser-training-one-of-the-best-news-sports-weather-traffic-best-of-pittsburgh/ Pa. Rep introduces legislation involving malicious use of Apple AirTagsRepresentative John Galloway is expected to formally introduce the legislation soon. 4 hours ago KDKA-TV Morning Forecast (1/25)Get the latest weather updates from meteorologist Ron Smiley! 4 hours ago Activists call for desk duty for officer Robert GowansAn investigation continues into the shooting death of Romir […]]]>

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How the Swiss model of vocational training can create jobs for young people in Kenya https://rgbonsai.com/how-the-swiss-model-of-vocational-training-can-create-jobs-for-young-people-in-kenya/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-the-swiss-model-of-vocational-training-can-create-jobs-for-young-people-in-kenya/ Ideas & Debate How the Swiss model of vocational training can create jobs for young people in Kenya Wednesday 10 November 2021 National Industrial Training Authority director of industrial training William Mwanza (left) and Hilti Foundation CEO Wallner Werner (center) at the launch of a learning project in Nairobi last month. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA […]]]>

Ideas & Debate

How the Swiss model of vocational training can create jobs for young people in Kenya


National Industrial Training Authority director of industrial training William Mwanza (left) and Hilti Foundation CEO Wallner Werner (center) at the launch of a learning project in Nairobi last month. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA | NMG

Zellweger

Summary

  • One of the most important conversations taking place in Kenya right now is about how to create more and better economic opportunities for young Kenyans who have completed their formal education and now want a job.
  • An ambitious new project recently launched by Swisscontact and the Hilti Foundation will explore the potential of the Swiss vocational training model for the Kenyan market.

One of the most important conversations taking place in Kenya right now is about how to create more and better economic opportunities for young Kenyans who have completed their formal education and now want a job.

An ambitious new project recently launched by Swisscontact and the Hilti Foundation will explore the potential of the Swiss vocational training model for the Kenyan market. The first indications are promising.

In education, as in many other fields, nations have an interest in studying what others have done to solve problems similar to those they face. And after such a study, they can then select from among the successful models, a few ideas that can be transplanted to meet the unique challenges of each country.

I think there may be useful lessons for Kenya in how the Swiss apprenticeship system has evolved over the years, to become one of the pillars of our economic success, as well as a mechanism for social inclusion.

Kenya faces a major challenge in creating enough jobs for its young people. Like many countries, Kenya has many highly qualified students but not enough employment opportunities.

One thing Switzerland is well known for is its pragmatism. We Swiss have the advantage of living in a country that constantly seeks the right balance between theory and practice, in order to allow all sections of society to prosper. This characteristic is one of the pillars of the stability of the Swiss political system.

Education and training in Switzerland are also good examples of this pragmatic attitude. Indeed, Switzerland has a flexible and dynamic education system, offering different avenues to young students, taking into account their skills and interests, but also the needs of the economy.

Let me briefly describe how this system works.

In Switzerland, education is administered by the cantons, the equivalent of counties in Kenya, and not by the central government. However, the system is to a large extent harmonized and similar across the country. It cannot in any case be said that a certain canton offers a higher quality of education than others.

Compulsory education generally consists of eight years of primary school and three years of college. Then, when the students are about 15 years old, they can choose between several possibilities. They have two main options.

The first is the classic high school route to continue the general studies course. This option usually leads to university studies. The second option is to do an apprenticeship, which is more practical and aims to allow the student to learn a specific trade, and thus to offer a direct path to a career in this field.

The apprenticeship is said to be alternating because the training takes place both at school and at work. While the work-related part is carried out at the workplace of the company which employs him, the apprentice also continues to follow theoretical training in the classroom.

In a typical example, an apprentice would spend two days a week at school and three days at work.

The five most popular occupations for vocational training are sales clerk, health worker, retail clerk, social worker, and computer technician.

The dual system has two particularities, all the more important as they mark the specificity of the Swiss system and are at the heart of its success.

First, the system is very flexible. The choices of 15-year-olds are not necessarily final, as there are many ways to change course afterwards.

Even if someone does an apprenticeship as an electrician, they still have the option of going to college without having to start all over again. This is crucial, because it takes the pressure off young students to have to make a final choice. It also encourages them to choose the path of learning. Honestly, who among us knew exactly what he wanted to do for the rest of his life at the age of 15?

The second particularity of the Swiss dual system is that apprenticeship is an integral part of the Swiss education system. They are highly regarded in Swiss society and are not seen as the “little sister” of an academic career. This respect is also reflected economically. Apprenticeship offers employment opportunities with good working conditions, including in terms of wages.

And let me stress that the high value attached to vocational training both socially and economically is absolutely crucial for its success.

The value of apprenticeship in Switzerland can be demonstrated statistically. Today, more than two-thirds of Swiss students choose apprenticeship after compulsory schooling instead of traditional high school.

Many high-level businessmen and political leaders in Switzerland are former apprentices. Sergio Ermotti, until recently CEO of UBS, the country’s largest bank, was an apprentice and did not go to high school. The same goes for Ueli Maurer, the Swiss Minister of Finance and President of the country in 2019.

Successful apprenticeship enables young people to acquire practical skills, in addition to general knowledge, and to be ready for the job market. This success is reflected in particular by the fact that Switzerland has one of the lowest youth unemployment rates in the world.

There is also an added value in the dual apprenticeship program. It can be clearly demonstrated that the economic value of the work performed by apprentices far exceeds the costs of their training.

In short, it means that the system benefits businesses in real terms. Not only in the long term, but even during the very years they are training their apprentices.

Dr Zellweger is the Swiss Ambassador to Kenya

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Do It Big, But Still Feel Small: Top Charts Rapper Lute Speaks About Mental Health | DFA 90.7 https://rgbonsai.com/do-it-big-but-still-feel-small-top-charts-rapper-lute-speaks-about-mental-health-dfa-90-7/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/do-it-big-but-still-feel-small-top-charts-rapper-lute-speaks-about-mental-health-dfa-90-7/ This is an extra-special episode of the WFAE amplifier. It’s special in that it was recorded at GrindHaus Studios in Charlotte, owned by former student of the Amplifier podcast Jason Jet. And it’s also special in that it’s Amplifier’s 100th episode. For this milestone achievement, Amplifier welcomes the aspiring rapper Lute, which embodies “Charlotte’s musical […]]]>

This is an extra-special episode of the WFAE amplifier.

It’s special in that it was recorded at GrindHaus Studios in Charlotte, owned by former student of the Amplifier podcast Jason Jet. And it’s also special in that it’s Amplifier’s 100th episode.

For this milestone achievement, Amplifier welcomes the aspiring rapper Lute, which embodies “Charlotte’s musical dream”. Lamar.

More than praise, Lute worked through personal grief and self-doubt to bring his verses to life, never forgetting his Charlotte roots and the people who supported him along the way – from his mixtape. self-released from 2012 until her full 2021 -long debut studio album.

“When I first started I thought success meant meeting J. Cole. Now I see my success differently. I didn’t graduate from high school, so I never graduated. the Sun “(with J. Cole, DaBaby and Kendrick Lamar), I finally had something with my name on it so I could hang it on the wall.”

– Grammy-nominated rapper Charlotte Lute signed to Dreamville Records

Interview highlights:

On his first musical memories:

Charlotte’s West Side was full of culture when I was growing up. I remember when Jay Z came over to the neighborhood record store called Willie’s, and everyone was jumping in their cars and running over to Willie’s to see him.

I remember when Tupac was killed. One of my neighbors had a model large screen TV on the floor. He pushed her over to the window, and everyone was standing outside on their porch watching the news. I will never forget him.

Back then, in the 90s and early 2000s, my brothers put me on all types of music. I have a brother where genres are not a thing. He has no barriers, so he listens to everything, including country. He really showed me a lot of different music. My other brother was more into hip-hop, and he put me on Goodie Mob, OutKast, and A Tribe Called Quest. And my other brother made me play the piano. Music has played a very important role in my life. The more music I heard, the more I became interested and wanted to make my own music. I started doing nursery rhymes when I was 10 years old. It was garbage, but it was a start.

On his first mixtape “West 1996:

It was basically me trying to show the world what life was like on Charlotte’s West Side. The reason I chose a rendition of the NAS album cover art for my mixtape cover was to show everyone that this was my neighborhood ‘Illmatic’ powered by music from 1996 style.

I don’t have the most orthodox way of writing music. I know a lot of people go into the cabin and freestyle and let it go, but I’m not that type of guy. I can freestyle here and there, and I like to do it for Instagram every now and then, but writing is therapeutic for me. It helps with my anxiety. Writing songs is like a journal for me, and my verses are journal entries. Sometimes I go back to the songs to see where I was in that place and in that space.

After being signed to J. Cole Dreamville Records label:

To this day, I still don’t know how it happened. I used to work at Walmart, and J. Cole contacted a friend of ours, and this friend contacted me. I thought my friend was joking, because I’m at work, and I almost got fired the day before. So I ended up following J. Cole on Twitter, and he followed me right away and told me he was at the Fillmore in Charlotte for the CIAA tournament, and he invited me. This is how we bonded for the first time. And that blew me away at the time.

Fast forward years later with J. Cole’s compilation album “Revenge of the Dreamers II”, and he put my song “Still Slummin ‘” on the record. I went to Best Buy to buy three copies of the album. I gave one to my mom, kept one in the plastic for myself, and opened the other and listened to the other all day as I walked around town. I went downtown, looked at Charlotte’s skyline and thought to myself, “Dude, my song is here! My name is on the back of a CD! It was a turning point for me.

On the meaning of his first studio release in 2021 “Mouf d’or:

Have you ever seen “The Nutty Professor?” Gold Mouf is to me what Buddy Love is to Professor Klump. So, me facing my anxiety, Gold Mouf is my confidence. I have this joke going on on Instagram where I post pictures of myself and I call it “Big Ugly” which is my low self esteem. But Gold Mouf, it’s the opposite, when I’m at the highest level of confidence. Gold Mouf debuted in Atlanta for the Dreamville sessions. I did six songs one night, and a manager gave me the nickname Gold Mouf because I broke my social barrier and my introverted nature. We all have these masks and affirmations that we use for our sanity and our self-confidence.

On managing anxiety and depression:

It’s hard to make music. I created “Gold Mouf” while dealing with all types of mental health issues. I didn’t know how I was going to finish this album. If you ask any of my friends they will tell you that at some point I thought this would be my last album. I fell in love with music. So it was hard for me to log in and go to the studio every day when I just wanted to come home and lay down and do nothing. It was hard to get through, but I had to come to terms with myself and realize that I had to be open and vulnerable about what I was going through. And once I became more open and more vulnerable about what I was writing, it all started to fall into place.

I had been working on their album for two and a half years, and my forties ruined me. There came a time when I had to see a therapist, and she made me realize that I am not only dealing with anxiety but also depression. And the way I dealt with anxiety didn’t work with depression. This project has therefore literally been my diary for two and a half years.

On the definition of success:

When I first started I thought success meant meeting J. Cole. Now I look at my success differently. I didn’t graduate from high school or anything so I never graduated or had anything with my official name on it except bills. So when I got the platinum plate for “Under the sun” (with J. Cole, DaBaby and Kendrick Lamar) I finally had something with my name on it so I could hang it on the wall.

Being from Charlotte:

Being from here, Charlotte’s music means a lot to me. I don’t grow plants, but when you see people tending a bonsai, that’s how Charlotte grew me. It’s me. I am, and it is me. For any other Charlotte artist, where we come from is what we embody in our music. Without Charlotte, there wouldn’t be me. We watched each other grow up.

Charlotte is a melting point, and we don’t have a definitive sound. We can tell you about our side of town and so many different genres. It’s not like a private school where everyone wears the same thing. We don’t need to sound the same and hold hands; I think it’s weird. I love that we can be individuals and not look like someone else to be on a big platform. It’s about amplifying yourself by being yourself.

Music presented in this chat #WFAEAmplifier:

Lute – “Carolina Folks”
Lute – “Flossin” feat. Boogie
Lute – “This is how it goes”
Lute – “Queen City Slummin ‘”
Lute – “Always Slummin ‘”
Lute – “Myself” with DEVN
J. Cole and Lute – feat “Under the Sun”. DaBaby and Kendrick Lamar
Lute – “Eye to Eye” with Cozz
Lute – “Agree”
Lute – “Ghetto Love” feat. Blakk Soul and Ari Lennox
Lute – “Crash”

Stay connected:

Click on here to subscribe to the Amplifier podcast (and to rate / review the podcast in your favorite podcast app).

Click on here to discover your next favorite Charlotte musician on our Amplifier Spotify playlist. Do you like what you hear ? Let us know on social media!

Talk with Joni Deutsch and tag WFAE on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Norwin resident seeks racial sensitivity and diversity training for school staff after students wear Confederate flag clothing https://rgbonsai.com/norwin-resident-seeks-racial-sensitivity-and-diversity-training-for-school-staff-after-students-wear-confederate-flag-clothing/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/norwin-resident-seeks-racial-sensitivity-and-diversity-training-for-school-staff-after-students-wear-confederate-flag-clothing/ A Norwin resident upset by two high school students wearing Confederate flag attire last week wants the district to consider implementing racial sensitivity and diversity inclusion training programs. LaSchalle Armstrong of North Huntingdon asked school officials on Monday to consider running racial sensitivity training for staff, who oversee school buildings, as well as training on […]]]>

A Norwin resident upset by two high school students wearing Confederate flag attire last week wants the district to consider implementing racial sensitivity and diversity inclusion training programs.

LaSchalle Armstrong of North Huntingdon asked school officials on Monday to consider running racial sensitivity training for staff, who oversee school buildings, as well as training on including diversity in every school. Armstrong offered to help with this training or provide referrals.

Per meeting procedures, neither trustees nor school board members responded to Armstrong at the meeting.

Board Chairman Brian Carlton declined to comment on the request afterward.

Superintendent Jeff Taylor could not be reached for comment.

“This Confederate flag symbolizes a statement of racism. This flag is used by white supremacists and used for a racial bullying factor,” Armstrong said during a public commentary portion of the virtual school board meeting. The flag symbolizes a South that fought to maintain slavery, she noted.

She could not be reached for further comment.

Armstrong said it was his daughter who told the administration on Oct. 11 that two students wore the clothes on ‘Merica Monday as part of Norwin’s Homecoming Week celebrations. The students had been encouraged to wear red, white and blue to show their support for the United States. Taylor said the administration responded quickly and the students changed their clothes.

Photos of the students wearing Confederate flag-style clothing circulated on social media and were sent to Pittsburgh-area newspapers and television stations.

An opposing view was offered by Deanna Betras of North Huntingdon, who told the council she was protesting what she saw as unequal treatment of students “who seek to express themselves and their beliefs through the clothes they wear.

These students have been singled out, while other students are allowed and encouraged to wear clothes that are political and offensive to others, Betras said. She criticized the district for sending what she called a “mixed message” and unfairly applying arbitrary rules.

“The Confederate flag is offensive to some. The BLM (Black Lives Matter) banner is offensive to some. God is offensive to some. Atheists are offensive to some,” Betras said.

Either the school district should ban all clothing with political symbolism or allow students to wear such clothing, Betras said.

It’s not the school district’s job “to determine what constitutes an offensive political position,” Betras said.

Joe Napsha is a staff writer for Tribune-Review. You can contact Joe at 724-836-5252, jnapsha@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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Make the beauty of bonsai permanent https://rgbonsai.com/make-the-beauty-of-bonsai-permanent/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/make-the-beauty-of-bonsai-permanent/ COLTS NECK – Rich Taylor grew up seeing his father’s interest in bonsai. They also piqued his interest. It won’t be long before Taylor incorporates his own adaptation, called Agapi Trees. “I’ve always had this fascination with them,” Taylor said, referring to bonsai, a Japanese art form that actually creates miniature trees. “My father was […]]]>

COLTS NECK – Rich Taylor grew up seeing his father’s interest in bonsai. They also piqued his interest. It won’t be long before Taylor incorporates his own adaptation, called Agapi Trees.

“I’ve always had this fascination with them,” Taylor said, referring to bonsai, a Japanese art form that actually creates miniature trees. “My father was passionate about bonsai and I watched him buy and handle them. As they grew and evolved he would work with them and go through the whole process, always bringing it to fruition. It has always been a daily regimen and it takes a lot of time and effort.

Taylor honed his artistic side at a young age in school.

“In high school, I won with a lot of art lessons,” Taylor said. “I then went on to study architecture at the University of Houston in Houston, Texas, where I grew up and lived most of my life. I quickly learned that I was not the best student in school, but I always had an affinity for art and I loved doing it.

Richard Taylor, artist and owner of Agapi Tree, a Colts Neck-based company that creates and sells bonsai-style tree sculptures, talks about his craft and business in his studio on Wednesday, August 4, 2021.

“The most amazing part for me was the design and concept aspect of it,” Taylor said. “Unfortunately, I quickly realized that finishing it just wasn’t in my cards and gave up after a short time there.”

Colts Neck Company:Source Brewing has its roots on a farm in NJ. Now it extends to Philly’s Fishtown

Moving to the East Coast

While studying there, Taylor worked for a time in the mailroom of an accounting firm, where he ended up meeting his future wife.

]]> America’s youngest bonsai master flourishes in native soil https://rgbonsai.com/americas-youngest-bonsai-master-flourishes-in-native-soil/ Thu, 01 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/americas-youngest-bonsai-master-flourishes-in-native-soil/ Bjorn Bjorholm, 34, zooms in from his home near Nashville, Tenn. It’s February, a deep winter, and her skin looks pale surrounded by bare white walls. Outside, an unusual cold snap has closed the town and its Eisei-en bonsai nursery sits under a thick blanket of snow. “Dreary” would be the best word, ”he says […]]]>

Bjorn Bjorholm, 34, zooms in from his home near Nashville, Tenn. It’s February, a deep winter, and her skin looks pale surrounded by bare white walls. Outside, an unusual cold snap has closed the town and its Eisei-en bonsai nursery sits under a thick blanket of snow. “Dreary” would be the best word, ”he says to describe the space. “Which is always the case in winter.”

Bjorholm, from Knoxville, Tenn., Explains the name of his dormant business: “Evergreen garden,” roughly translated from Japanese; the one that is always in bloom. “But it also has some deeper meanings,” he continues. “Forever young”, or having an open mind, ready to learn. “And that can also translate to ‘always green’, like always making money,” he laughs. “My wife made it up.”

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Called the “Brad Pitt of bonsai,” the six-foot-six Bjorholm is a house of mirrors when juxtaposed with his chosen contraption. With the muscular construction of a tight end, in good weather he towers over miniature trees which he bends, tears and cuts. He was even more visible during his nine years in Kyoto, Japan after college, most of which was spent in the routine of learning bonsai seven days a week from sunrise to sunset. He was an anomaly, “a novelty,” he says of his apprenticeship under the guidance of elder Keiichi Fujikawa. Despite the master’s initial reluctance to hire an apprentice, let alone a foreigner, Bjorholm came to be treated like a son as well as some sort of local celebrity. Customers in their forties, depositing their trees at the nursery for annual maintenance, would seek his hand rather than that of the owner. “I like to think it was because I was good,” he said, “but I think it was because they wanted to brag to their friends that a Westerner had styled their tree.”

But as infatuated as he was with Japanese culture, which led him to make the decision to emigrate, the great American quickly left his tourist mentality behind and became one with the land itself. (After all, after a decade very few people still feel like a foreigner.) One of his greatest lessons: patience, a virtue he believes most North Americans don’t understand. “Say, for example, that you remove a large branch from a tree,” he says. “You want that wound to heal in four, five, six years, so in 20 years it’s imperceptible on the trunk of the tree. You must therefore know the right technique and apply it now to be able to achieve this result in 20 years. These are all things that I think about much more deeply from my learning in Japan. “

Contrary to the understanding of many in America, bonsai is not a species of tree but a style of cultivation, in which specific trees, selected by the merits of their curvature, the size of their leaves and their adaptability. , are established in small pots and trained to grow. in certain curves and planes. In a field, they can grow to 40 feet or more, but with precise pruning, dressage wires, and shallow dishes, they live their hundreds of years in miniature. Another detail that goes against popular belief: while bonsai training can be gradual, for young trees it is often violent, with pruned branches and sheared taproots. Any action plan, fast or slow, is obtained by a spirit of decision turned towards the future. Cuts are made to focus the blossoming. “It totally changed my perspective on work, on life, on thinking about the future, on culture, on everything,” says Bjorholm.

In Japan, bonsai, like sumo and sushi, is a subculture in itself that far exceeds the surface knowledge of the United States. with pages in glossy magazines and portraits sewn onto handkerchiefs. “There are 50 to 60 trees in Japan that everyone knows. And of those 50 or 60 trees, there are probably four or five that will forever be considered the best bonsai in the history of the world, ”he says. “So, yeah, seeing these in person was crazy.”

Bjorholm looks like an American when he talks about the awe he felt walking through these exhibition halls with his head and shoulders higher than the native population and speechless from his poor Japanese and the effects of ‘be struck by the stars. But his actions were anything but stereotypical American during the long hours of a six-year apprenticeship, which could include repotting hundreds of trees and then walking through town to help Fujikawa-sensei’s parents pull vegetables from them. their garden. Under the guidance of his teacher, he grew up, and after graduating from the program, he remained working in the same nursery while traveling within the country. He and his wife, a Chinese national he met during a study abroad program in his last year, considered staying in Japan, but immigration restrictions meant they would have to still a decade before they can start their own nursery. In the long run, it was a bad future, and so Bjorholm made a decision, returning to the United States in 2017 and relocating to Nashville, where he believed he would find the most fertile ground to develop his own business.

Bonsai has been in the United States for decades, although it is largely a japonophile hobby. Bonsai techniques were passed on from first generation Japanese immigrants to other Americans, who then passed them on to young people like Bjorholm. In this generational transfer, Asian trees had become orthodoxy. “It was the Japanese species,” he recalls. “It has never been so cool working with native stuff until I come back from Japan and realize how good the base material is here.”

While he had experimented with American flora as a high school student – after all, it’s cheaper to dig up a tree in a field than to buy a seedling from a garden center – red cedars and Virginia pines didn’t hold the mystery of a Japanese Maple. But after nearly a decade in Japan, with mystery replaced by practicality, Bjornholm began to soberly appraise New World wood, and what he found was promising.

“When [the Japanese] see our native material here, they are very jealous, ”he says, explaining that in Japan, the overexploitation of wild trees from the 70s adapted to bonsai, or yamadori, led to the scarcity of wild nature, and since then the collection has been prohibited. At the same time, a growing and affluent Chinese market buys heritage trees, a second deforestation. “All that is bonsai in Japan is all they have,” he said, “so there are fewer and fewer good trees in Japan. Here there is an almost endless supply.

Bjorholm has not only become a pioneer and advocate for North American species adapted to bonsai, but he is also a leading educator in the United States. Thanks to his YouTube channel, which he films and edits himself, he has already amassed over 150,000 subscribers, which is no small feat for what many consider a niche hobby. For subscribers, part of the attraction is its natural magnetism; minimalist and refined sets; and clear instructions. But a lot can also be attributed to the influx of bonsai researchers in 2020, during which any socially remote activity that state governments have not restricted, from houseplants to bicycles, has seen unprecedented demand. .

“Right now in the United States, bonsai is booming,” he says. “Plus, the ability to work with native material and do unique and interesting things that have never been done before has all happened before us.”

The late winter season, which he calls “the calm before the storm,” offers a brief respite. Its workshop and cold frame are filled with trees stacked on all surfaces to protect them from single-digit temperatures, which are extreme even for hardy trees, and the outdoor benches they are typically displayed on are buried under six inches of height. ice and snow.

But spring is coming.

With temperatures forecast to reach the 60s in the coming week, Bjorholm can already see into the future. Over the next few days, this snow-covered space will melt on the bare wood shelves, and it will slowly move the trees towards the sun. In March, the bare brown and gray branches will swell with green buds before the reds of the freshly foliated deciduous trees, the chartreuse feathers of the juniper branches and the pale blossoms of the cherry trees will dot the space. Customers will drive, lay down their overwintered trees for annual maintenance, prune new growth, and rewire branches and trunks. And at the end of April, his wife will give birth to their first child, a daughter.

We talk a little more about the North American wild species that he collects to learn about a new culture. The agents he works with in Colorado scour the backcountry looking for the right trees to carefully remove and return to Eisei-en and a new home in the south.

“These plants, in their natural environment, survive. That’s why they all look twisted and gnarled, ”says Bjorholm, owner of the evergreen garden. “Our goal is to make them prosper.

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Free training program launched in Pittsburgh for people looking for tech jobs https://rgbonsai.com/free-training-program-launched-in-pittsburgh-for-people-looking-for-tech-jobs/ Mon, 08 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/free-training-program-launched-in-pittsburgh-for-people-looking-for-tech-jobs/ A nationally recognized technology training provider will launch operations in Pittsburgh and offer free training to its local first class in March. When the first class of 30 people complete the 12- to 15-week program, they will be prepared for entry-level programming work that pays between $ 50,000 and $ 60,000 per year, according to […]]]>

A nationally recognized technology training provider will launch operations in Pittsburgh and offer free training to its local first class in March.

When the first class of 30 people complete the 12- to 15-week program, they will be prepared for entry-level programming work that pays between $ 50,000 and $ 60,000 per year, according to Plinio Ayala, president and chief. from the New York branch. based By Scholas.

The company is in partnership with TEKsystems, a technology services provider, to provide training with funding from grants and support from foundations in the Pittsburgh area, said Ayala.

Pittsburgh will become the 14th city with a Per Scholas location. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, initial training sessions will be virtual, but Per Scholas will also be looking for a physical location in the city.

The offer was announced at a virtual press conference on Monday coordinated by the Allegheny Conference on Community Development.

Per Scholas’ track record of training people from diverse backgrounds for tech jobs has been touted by officials in the region’s workforce development agencies, including InnovatePGH, Partner4Work and the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance.

There are talented people everywhere, but not everyone has access to the training opportunities offered by Per Scholas, Ayala said.

“I think the opportunity in Pittsburgh is huge,” he said.

The city’s booming tech industry is full of available jobs, and business development groups have long struggled to find ways to develop local talent and keep people in Pittsburgh, said Earl Buford, CEO of the non-profit organization for workforce development Partner4Work.

Per Scholas has a proven track record in training minorities, women and young adults, said Jack Mills, Director of Strategy and Innovation at Partner4Work.

About 87 percent of participants and graduates of Per Scholas’ training are people of color, one-third of participants are women, and one-third of participants are young adults, Mills said.

“We are proud to welcome this organization to the Pittsburgh marketplace and advance economic equity through training that can lead to long-term careers,” said Buford.

Per Scholas is accepting applications until the end of February for his first course, which will start on March 15.

The initial course is intended for a Java developer. Participants will learn to code using the Java programming language.

The only qualification that prospective students must have is a high school diploma or the GED equivalent. To apply, Click here and choose Pittsburgh as the location.

Tom Davidson is Editor-in-Chief of Tribune-Review. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, tdavidson@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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Dog training and daycare continues after death of ‘taranto dog whisperer’ Bruce Ringer https://rgbonsai.com/dog-training-and-daycare-continues-after-death-of-taranto-dog-whisperer-bruce-ringer/ Thu, 24 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/dog-training-and-daycare-continues-after-death-of-taranto-dog-whisperer-bruce-ringer/ Bruce D. Ringer’s love for dogs and his wife was overt and unsurprisingly intertwined. Longtime legendary dog ​​trainer Ringer, 63, of Taranto, died of colon cancer on December 20. He has been a dog trainer for over 35 years and opened the first dog daycare center in Allegheny County. Ringer was the first nationally certified […]]]>

Bruce D. Ringer’s love for dogs and his wife was overt and unsurprisingly intertwined.

Longtime legendary dog ​​trainer Ringer, 63, of Taranto, died of colon cancer on December 20.

He has been a dog trainer for over 35 years and opened the first dog daycare center in Allegheny County. Ringer was the first nationally certified professional dog trainer, according to his family, and the first certified “dog nose job” instructor in western Pennsylvania.

He was involved in the search at the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville after the September 11 attacks.

“We met over a German Shepherd puppy,” said Kim Ringer, his 37-year-old wife.

It was in 1977 that the couple met at the corner of Morgan Street and Ninth Avenue in Brackenridge when Bruce was out with his puppy.

“Is it a sheepdog?” Kim knowingly asked Bruce.

“Do you know that’s a sheepdog?” he said.

The couple never stopped talking and loving dogs.

“We always had one – if not 10 – shepherds at a time,” she said. “Dogs are our children.”

An Army veteran, Ringer was a certified welder and sheet metal worker.

But the couple opened Ringer’s Pet Dog Training in Taranto in 1996, then a second location in Harrison’s Natrona Heights.

“He was a caring soul who loved dogs, and we had to do what we loved,” Ringer said.

“It’s a 24/7 job,” said Ringer, who is also a certified dog trainer. She plans to continue classes and dog daycare.

An outpouring of grief came in the hundreds of internet posts, as nearly 500 people sent their condolences Thursday afternoon to the Ringers Dog Pet Training Facebook page. A local customer wrote: “Bruce was a wonderful man. We have always considered him the “dog whisperer of Taranto”. ”

Ringer graduated in 1975 from Highlands High School. He is survived by his wife, Kim; his four dogs and many care dogs who were like family; his mother, Dorothy Ringer; sister, Barbara Cranfill, of Lakeland, Florida; brother, Andrew Brian Ringer, of Anchorage, Alaska; nine nieces and nephews, and nine great-nieces and nephews.

In accordance with Bruce Ringer’s wishes, there will be no public viewing. Robert Peters Funeral Home in Harrison is making arrangements. Condolences can be submitted online at Peters Funeral Home.

Memorial contributions for Bruce’s medical expenses can be mailed to Kim Ringer, 3041 Freeport Road, Natrona Heights, PA 15065, or via Ringer’s Pet Dog Training Facebook page.

Kim Ringer created a post on Facebook and GoFundMe account seeking $20,000 in donations to pay her husband’s medical bills. By Thursday afternoon, nearly $7,000 had been raised.

Mary Ann Thomas is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Mary at 724-226-4691, mthomas@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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