miniature trees http://rgbonsai.com/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 19:32:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png miniature trees http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Bonsai Show returns to NC Research Campus | Local News https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-show-returns-to-nc-research-campus-local-news/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/bonsai-show-returns-to-nc-research-campus-local-news/ In addition to the top-quality bonsai on display, those who want to get started in bonsai as well as experienced hobbyists can visit more than 50 tables of pre-bonsai planting material and bonsai supplies for sale at the show. Exceptional bonsai pots will also be sold. Bonsai is an ancient art form, originating in China […]]]>

In addition to the top-quality bonsai on display, those who want to get started in bonsai as well as experienced hobbyists can visit more than 50 tables of pre-bonsai planting material and bonsai supplies for sale at the show. Exceptional bonsai pots will also be sold.

Bonsai is an ancient art form, originating in China and later adopted by the Japanese. The word bonsai, in Japanese, means “tree in a pot”. The oldest trees in the United States were a gift from Japan during the country’s bicentennial (1976). A tree, still on display at the National Arboretum, dates from before Christopher Columbus discovered America and was a gift from the Japanese government to the United States on our 200th anniversary.






High: With the exception of tropical bonsai trees, such as fig trees, bonsai trees must be kept outdoors to live. Law: The Winter Silhouette Bonsai Show is coming to Kannapolis. A small bonsai exhibit is held in June in Kannapolis and an annual exhibit is held at the NC Arboretum in Asheville.


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Why would anyone choose bonsai as a hobby? It is a mixture of sculpture and gardening. Trees get better the more you work on them, so patience is a virtue. Bonsai trees are normal trees that are styled by wiring their branches to create the image of an old tree, and they are kept small by root pruning. These trees could grow in a yard to their full size if allowed.

Only tropical bonsai (like figs) can be kept indoors; most bonsai must be kept outdoors to survive. The art of bonsai is to make trees appear like old miniature trees. On display at the show: isolated trees as well as groups of trees that will remind you of past hikes in the forest.

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Man’s ‘Pride and Joy’ Bonsai Worth Thousands Stolen From His Garden https://rgbonsai.com/mans-pride-and-joy-bonsai-worth-thousands-stolen-from-his-garden/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/mans-pride-and-joy-bonsai-worth-thousands-stolen-from-his-garden/ Provided The grower, a 68-year-old man from Mount Albert, is “heartbroken” to have lost his plants. An Auckland man has lost ‘years of his heart and soul’ after more than 40 of his bonsai trees were stolen from his Mount Albert home. The man’s son, Nick Yu, appeals to the public to help find the […]]]>
The producer, a 68-year-old man from Mount Albert, is "sorry" have lost their plants.

Provided

The grower, a 68-year-old man from Mount Albert, is “heartbroken” to have lost his plants.

An Auckland man has lost ‘years of his heart and soul’ after more than 40 of his bonsai trees were stolen from his Mount Albert home.

The man’s son, Nick Yu, appeals to the public to help find the miniature trees, which are worth thousands of dollars to buy, but worth even more to the dedicated and heartbroken grower.

In a public Facebook post, Yu, who lives in Melbourne, Australia, said 29 plants were stolen in the early hours of Sunday morning. The thieves returned the next day and took about 15 more.

Yu said his 68-year-old father had been “a keen student of the art of bonsai for over 30 years.”

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“He cared for these miniature trees on a daily basis as if they were his own children. Watching them grow inch by inch and slowly carve them over the years.

“He displayed them proudly around the house and invited friends and families to enjoy them.

“They were his pride and his joy, masterpieces that took him decades to grow. They had also brought him joy and [a] sense of accomplishment in these difficult times of covid lockdowns.

The owner's son says his father "nurtured these miniature trees every day as if they were her own children".

Provided

The owner’s son recounts that his father “maintained these miniature trees daily as if they were his own children”.

Yu said his parents were not materialistic people.

“The house has been broken into several times, and they don’t think about it,” he said. “But these trees mean a lot to my father. I am absolutely heartbroken for their loss.

He said the thieves knew exactly what they were looking for and chose the most prized plants.

The Mount Albert man has been studying the art of bonsai for over 30 years.

Provided

The Mount Albert man has been studying the art of bonsai for over 30 years.

It was “years of his heart and soul taken overnight because of someone’s senseless greed”.

“My dad is a person who lives half full – he always teaches me to look on the bright side. He said to me, ‘At least they didn’t take it all’ and showed me some beautiful plants that have remained.

Moira from the Auckland Bonsai Society said theft was a “real problem for all bonsai growers”. She did not want to give her last name for security reasons and advised other growers to make sure their plants were not visible from the street.

JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/STUFF

Forty-six bonsai plants, along with pots and pumps, were stolen from a Christchurch garden center on Boxing Day.

“We feel so bad for him,” she said. “It will be his life’s work. He took care of them for 20, 30 years.

“I really hope someone is good enough to return them to good condition.”

New Zealand gardener Jo McCarroll, editor, said bonsai “regularly change hands for hundreds or even thousands of dollars”.

“”It’s terrible to think that someone just walked away with all those years of meticulous care.”

Police confirmed they had received a burglary report and were investigating.

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Make the beauty of bonsai permanent https://rgbonsai.com/make-the-beauty-of-bonsai-permanent/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/make-the-beauty-of-bonsai-permanent/ COLTS NECK – Rich Taylor grew up seeing his father’s interest in bonsai. They also piqued his interest. It won’t be long before Taylor incorporates his own adaptation, called Agapi Trees. “I’ve always had this fascination with them,” Taylor said, referring to bonsai, a Japanese art form that actually creates miniature trees. “My father was […]]]>

COLTS NECK – Rich Taylor grew up seeing his father’s interest in bonsai. They also piqued his interest. It won’t be long before Taylor incorporates his own adaptation, called Agapi Trees.

“I’ve always had this fascination with them,” Taylor said, referring to bonsai, a Japanese art form that actually creates miniature trees. “My father was passionate about bonsai and I watched him buy and handle them. As they grew and evolved he would work with them and go through the whole process, always bringing it to fruition. It has always been a daily regimen and it takes a lot of time and effort.

Taylor honed his artistic side at a young age in school.

“In high school, I won with a lot of art lessons,” Taylor said. “I then went on to study architecture at the University of Houston in Houston, Texas, where I grew up and lived most of my life. I quickly learned that I was not the best student in school, but I always had an affinity for art and I loved doing it.

Richard Taylor, artist and owner of Agapi Tree, a Colts Neck-based company that creates and sells bonsai-style tree sculptures, talks about his craft and business in his studio on Wednesday, August 4, 2021.

“The most amazing part for me was the design and concept aspect of it,” Taylor said. “Unfortunately, I quickly realized that finishing it just wasn’t in my cards and gave up after a short time there.”

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Moving to the East Coast

While studying there, Taylor worked for a time in the mailroom of an accounting firm, where he ended up meeting his future wife.

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How to get started with the best bonsai trees for beginners https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-get-started-with-the-best-bonsai-trees-for-beginners/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/how-to-get-started-with-the-best-bonsai-trees-for-beginners/ Photo: TONG2519 (Shutterstock) When you hear the phrase “a bonsai” you are probably thinking of these tiny, ornate trees that people often keep as a kind of desktop ornament. But In fact, Bonsai is not a type of tree at all – the “B” wordonsai” refers to art form and horticultural method of growing miniature […]]]>

Image for article titled How to get started with bonsai trees without killing them

Photo: TONG2519 (Shutterstock)

When you hear the phrase “a bonsai” you are probably thinking of these tiny, ornate trees that people often keep as a kind of desktop ornament. But In fact, Bonsai is not a type of tree at all – the “B” wordonsai” refers to art form and horticultural method of growing miniature landscapes. The art of bonsai native China and evolved when Japan Shrunk the technique focus on miniature trees rather than whole trees gardens.

bonsai cultivation has become a trend which spread to the United States in the years following World War II and is now practiced in homes around the world. Cultivation method requires clarification carve and carve plant care to keep delicate trees alive and maintain their small structure. For novice growers, this process involves bit of a learning curve, but mental health benefits maybe deep. Here are three types of plants that help beginners master the art of bonsai.

What are the benefits of Bonsai gardening?

Bonsai trees are also known as the “tree of life”. They say take care of them reduce stresspromote concentration, and help relieve the symptoms of depression. Less concretely, some believe miniature trees lend a magical properties of the house and their care can bestow prosperity and good luck. It’s a surprisingly deep hobby that you can learn with low initial investment—just a plant and a pair of cubs the shears will get you started. (Of course, as with any other steptime, you can also pay a parcel silver in art.)

How to care for different types of bonsai

Magical thinking aside, tThe plants themselves require no unusually heavy care. Depending on the variety, ththey need very little light, which, coupled with their small size means you put them almost anywhere in your home. With proper attention, unique trees thrive as houseplants.

With all plants, some are more complicated than others. Because bonsai is an art form, different styles of plants require specific care. As a beginner, most of all you want the plant to live while you learn the ropes.

How to keep a ficus bonsai alive

The ficus bonsai is an upright style of tree with flat glossy green leaves. Although bonsai trees can survive in low light conditions, this should be placed near a bright area in your house where he can get at least a few moments of sunshine. Ficus are usually ttropical plants that are accustomed to a humid climate, but these resistant specimens only needs watering once a week, and enjoy from time to time light mist. Most bonsai require similar soil types including lava stone, pumice stone or organic soil. These soils provide good drainage and good moisture retention. Bonsai soil can be purchased at most garden stores and will cost anywhere between $9 and $15 or a bag (depending on type.)

Pruning requires cutting off old leaves after new growth has reached 7 to 10 cm. You will be want to cut the oldest, yellow leaves before they drop to make way for new growth and keep the plant’s miniature size and shape intact. A ficus will usually run you $20 for $60according to the seller and the initial Cut. Ficus are fairly self-sufficient and will remain quite small (varies with their pot size)making them perfect for the beginner still developing their bonsai skills.

How to Grow a Chinese Elm Bonsai

Chinese elm Bonsai has a unique shape, with a twisted trunk that grows straight and produces small dark green leaves. these slow-grow plants give the beginner planter plenty of time to try out his technique. Chinese elm trees like direct sunlight in the spring, but the summer sun is overwhelming, so kkeep them in a bright place area of ​​your home, but remember to shade them during the summer months. Watering is quite simple-tThey don’t require a lot of moisture, so overwatering could lead to root rot. the to place Bonsai Gardener advise: “Check it every few days, [and] water when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch.

Size is only necessary during the spring months, promote germination during the growing season and help the tree keep its small shape. The Chinese elm needs little wiring (the name of process used to shape bonsai trees); prunning alone will keep their shape. Since these trees are popular for their uniqueness look, they can be a bit more expensive, ranging from $35 to $100+. For less than $100, bbeginners can buy one starter kit with everything from pruning shears to fertilizer to start their travel.

How to take care for a jade bonsai

One of the easiest Bonsai to maintain is the variety of jade. Because jade trees are succulents, they require very little attention, but have an unusual and attractive look and feel. They grow upright and their small, fleshy green leaves grow along the stem. They can be treated as a succulent, requiring very little water but an excellent evacuation system. Water them around every 10 at 20 days. Unlike other varieties of bonsai, yYou will want to place them in a dry, warm location with plenty of sun to mimic the desert conditions in which they thrive.

Trimming a jade plant is fun because you can’t really go wrong. You can cut it down to its stems without killing it. Cut keeps the plant small, promotes new growth and thickens its trunk. Jade plants adapt easily to wiring, allowing you to shape the small plants in any direction, making their one of the most durable Bonsai for beginners.

Jade plants are not the cheapest variety of bonsai, but they are mmore affordable than Chinese elms. A jade Bonsai will cost you anywhere from $45 for $80depending on the size. You can practice pruning as you like, and if you forget to water them, it’s OK—they can easily be revived with a little the water.

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America’s youngest bonsai master flourishes in native soil https://rgbonsai.com/americas-youngest-bonsai-master-flourishes-in-native-soil/ Thu, 01 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/americas-youngest-bonsai-master-flourishes-in-native-soil/ Bjorn Bjorholm, 34, zooms in from his home near Nashville, Tenn. It’s February, a deep winter, and her skin looks pale surrounded by bare white walls. Outside, an unusual cold snap has closed the town and its Eisei-en bonsai nursery sits under a thick blanket of snow. “Dreary” would be the best word, ”he says […]]]>

Bjorn Bjorholm, 34, zooms in from his home near Nashville, Tenn. It’s February, a deep winter, and her skin looks pale surrounded by bare white walls. Outside, an unusual cold snap has closed the town and its Eisei-en bonsai nursery sits under a thick blanket of snow. “Dreary” would be the best word, ”he says to describe the space. “Which is always the case in winter.”

Bjorholm, from Knoxville, Tenn., Explains the name of his dormant business: “Evergreen garden,” roughly translated from Japanese; the one that is always in bloom. “But it also has some deeper meanings,” he continues. “Forever young”, or having an open mind, ready to learn. “And that can also translate to ‘always green’, like always making money,” he laughs. “My wife made it up.”

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Called the “Brad Pitt of bonsai,” the six-foot-six Bjorholm is a house of mirrors when juxtaposed with his chosen contraption. With the muscular construction of a tight end, in good weather he towers over miniature trees which he bends, tears and cuts. He was even more visible during his nine years in Kyoto, Japan after college, most of which was spent in the routine of learning bonsai seven days a week from sunrise to sunset. He was an anomaly, “a novelty,” he says of his apprenticeship under the guidance of elder Keiichi Fujikawa. Despite the master’s initial reluctance to hire an apprentice, let alone a foreigner, Bjorholm came to be treated like a son as well as some sort of local celebrity. Customers in their forties, depositing their trees at the nursery for annual maintenance, would seek his hand rather than that of the owner. “I like to think it was because I was good,” he said, “but I think it was because they wanted to brag to their friends that a Westerner had styled their tree.”

But as infatuated as he was with Japanese culture, which led him to make the decision to emigrate, the great American quickly left his tourist mentality behind and became one with the land itself. (After all, after a decade very few people still feel like a foreigner.) One of his greatest lessons: patience, a virtue he believes most North Americans don’t understand. “Say, for example, that you remove a large branch from a tree,” he says. “You want that wound to heal in four, five, six years, so in 20 years it’s imperceptible on the trunk of the tree. You must therefore know the right technique and apply it now to be able to achieve this result in 20 years. These are all things that I think about much more deeply from my learning in Japan. “

Contrary to the understanding of many in America, bonsai is not a species of tree but a style of cultivation, in which specific trees, selected by the merits of their curvature, the size of their leaves and their adaptability. , are established in small pots and trained to grow. in certain curves and planes. In a field, they can grow to 40 feet or more, but with precise pruning, dressage wires, and shallow dishes, they live their hundreds of years in miniature. Another detail that goes against popular belief: while bonsai training can be gradual, for young trees it is often violent, with pruned branches and sheared taproots. Any action plan, fast or slow, is obtained by a spirit of decision turned towards the future. Cuts are made to focus the blossoming. “It totally changed my perspective on work, on life, on thinking about the future, on culture, on everything,” says Bjorholm.

In Japan, bonsai, like sumo and sushi, is a subculture in itself that far exceeds the surface knowledge of the United States. with pages in glossy magazines and portraits sewn onto handkerchiefs. “There are 50 to 60 trees in Japan that everyone knows. And of those 50 or 60 trees, there are probably four or five that will forever be considered the best bonsai in the history of the world, ”he says. “So, yeah, seeing these in person was crazy.”

Bjorholm looks like an American when he talks about the awe he felt walking through these exhibition halls with his head and shoulders higher than the native population and speechless from his poor Japanese and the effects of ‘be struck by the stars. But his actions were anything but stereotypical American during the long hours of a six-year apprenticeship, which could include repotting hundreds of trees and then walking through town to help Fujikawa-sensei’s parents pull vegetables from them. their garden. Under the guidance of his teacher, he grew up, and after graduating from the program, he remained working in the same nursery while traveling within the country. He and his wife, a Chinese national he met during a study abroad program in his last year, considered staying in Japan, but immigration restrictions meant they would have to still a decade before they can start their own nursery. In the long run, it was a bad future, and so Bjorholm made a decision, returning to the United States in 2017 and relocating to Nashville, where he believed he would find the most fertile ground to develop his own business.

Bonsai has been in the United States for decades, although it is largely a japonophile hobby. Bonsai techniques were passed on from first generation Japanese immigrants to other Americans, who then passed them on to young people like Bjorholm. In this generational transfer, Asian trees had become orthodoxy. “It was the Japanese species,” he recalls. “It has never been so cool working with native stuff until I come back from Japan and realize how good the base material is here.”

While he had experimented with American flora as a high school student – after all, it’s cheaper to dig up a tree in a field than to buy a seedling from a garden center – red cedars and Virginia pines didn’t hold the mystery of a Japanese Maple. But after nearly a decade in Japan, with mystery replaced by practicality, Bjornholm began to soberly appraise New World wood, and what he found was promising.

“When [the Japanese] see our native material here, they are very jealous, ”he says, explaining that in Japan, the overexploitation of wild trees from the 70s adapted to bonsai, or yamadori, led to the scarcity of wild nature, and since then the collection has been prohibited. At the same time, a growing and affluent Chinese market buys heritage trees, a second deforestation. “All that is bonsai in Japan is all they have,” he said, “so there are fewer and fewer good trees in Japan. Here there is an almost endless supply.

Bjorholm has not only become a pioneer and advocate for North American species adapted to bonsai, but he is also a leading educator in the United States. Thanks to his YouTube channel, which he films and edits himself, he has already amassed over 150,000 subscribers, which is no small feat for what many consider a niche hobby. For subscribers, part of the attraction is its natural magnetism; minimalist and refined sets; and clear instructions. But a lot can also be attributed to the influx of bonsai researchers in 2020, during which any socially remote activity that state governments have not restricted, from houseplants to bicycles, has seen unprecedented demand. .

“Right now in the United States, bonsai is booming,” he says. “Plus, the ability to work with native material and do unique and interesting things that have never been done before has all happened before us.”

The late winter season, which he calls “the calm before the storm,” offers a brief respite. Its workshop and cold frame are filled with trees stacked on all surfaces to protect them from single-digit temperatures, which are extreme even for hardy trees, and the outdoor benches they are typically displayed on are buried under six inches of height. ice and snow.

But spring is coming.

With temperatures forecast to reach the 60s in the coming week, Bjorholm can already see into the future. Over the next few days, this snow-covered space will melt on the bare wood shelves, and it will slowly move the trees towards the sun. In March, the bare brown and gray branches will swell with green buds before the reds of the freshly foliated deciduous trees, the chartreuse feathers of the juniper branches and the pale blossoms of the cherry trees will dot the space. Customers will drive, lay down their overwintered trees for annual maintenance, prune new growth, and rewire branches and trunks. And at the end of April, his wife will give birth to their first child, a daughter.

We talk a little more about the North American wild species that he collects to learn about a new culture. The agents he works with in Colorado scour the backcountry looking for the right trees to carefully remove and return to Eisei-en and a new home in the south.

“These plants, in their natural environment, survive. That’s why they all look twisted and gnarled, ”says Bjorholm, owner of the evergreen garden. “Our goal is to make them prosper.

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The ancient history and symbolic meaning of bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/the-ancient-history-and-symbolic-meaning-of-bonsai/ Sat, 06 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/the-ancient-history-and-symbolic-meaning-of-bonsai/ Photo: Photos by Thanun Patiparnthada/Shutterstock Bonsai trees have a strong association with Japan. But did you know that the art of growing miniature trees actually originated in ancient China? In 700 CE, the Chinese used special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers. The practice became known as “pun-sai” (or “penzai”) and was originally cultivated […]]]>

Photo: Photos by Thanun Patiparnthada/Shutterstock

Bonsai trees have a strong association with Japan. But did you know that the art of growing miniature trees actually originated in ancient China? In 700 CE, the Chinese used special techniques to grow dwarf trees in containers. The practice became known as “pun-sai” (or “penzai”) and was originally cultivated only by the elite of society. It was not until the Kamakura period (1185 to 1333) that the cultivation of miniature trees in pots was introduced to Japan. And today, even western nature lovers grow and care for bonsai like living works of art.

Read on to learn the history and meaning of these special trees.

a bonsai

A Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) bonsai, China Collection 111, on display at the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in the United States National Arboretum. (Photo: WikimediaCommons (CC BY-SA 3.0))

What is the meaning of the term bonsai?

Bonsai is a Japanese word meaning “tree in a pot”. However, the term originally comes from the Chinese word “pun-sai” or “penjing”. In Chinese, “pen” means pot and “jing” means decor or landscape.

Bonsai trees are meant to be a miniature representation of nature, planted in decorative containers.

What does bonsai symbolize?

When bonsai trees were first introduced to China over 1,300 years ago, they were considered a status symbol among the elite of society. Today, however, bonsai trees are enjoyed by people all over the world.

Depending on a person’s culture or beliefs, bonsai trees are considered symbols of harmony, balance, patience, or even luck. Many people simply use potted trees as living ornaments for interior decoration, while others – Zen Buddhists for example – think of bonsai as an object of meditation or contemplation.

The history of bonsai in China

a bonsai

Penzai mural in the Tang dynasty tomb of Prince Zhanghuai, 706 AD (Photo: WikimediaCommons Public Domain)

In ancient China, early explorers were probably the first to discover miniature trees growing high in the mountains. This climate saw harsh conditions where growth was difficult, so the prized dwarf trees were particularly gnarled in appearance. As early as the 4th century BCE, Taoists believed that recreating aspects of nature in miniature allowed people to access their magical properties. Hence, penjing was born. It involved creating miniature landscapes displayed on earthenware.

In an effort to recreate the natural trees they found in the mountains, the Chinese developed pruning and binding techniques that gave plants twisted shapes and an aged look. Some historians believe that the Taoists shaped the branches and trunks of miniature trees to resemble animals from Chinese folklore, such as dragons and snakes. Others believe that the distorted plant formations resemble yoga positions.

The first pictorial evidence of artistically formed miniature trees appeared in 706 CE in the tomb of Prince Zhang Huai. Upon entering, archaeologists discovered murals depicting servant girls wearing penjing, which contained miniature trees and rocks.

The history of bonsai in Japan

a bonsai

Japanese woodblock print by Keisai Eisen, 1848 (Photo: WikimediaCommons (CC0 1.0))

During the reign of the Hang dynasty, Chinese monks migrated to Japan and other parts of Asia, taking with them examples of penzai. Japanese Zen Buddhist monks learned the techniques needed to make miniature trees, later known as bonsai. The Japanese developed their own methods for creating dwarf trees, resulting in different styles compared to Chinese penzai.

Japanese bonsai trees were usually about one to two feet tall and required many years of expert care. The branches, trunks and roots got their twisted look by maintaining the desired shape – using bamboo and wire – as the tree grew. And to achieve a particular shape, artists often grafted new branches onto existing ones. Some species even bore fruit, while others bloomed leaves and flowers. By the 14th century bonsai trees were considered a highly respected art form. Prized plants quickly made their way from monasteries to the king’s houses. Just like in China, trees have become symbols of status and honor.

In the early 1600s, Japanese bonsai evolved again. Skilled artists began to use special pruning techniques to remove all but essential parts of plants. This created a minimalist look, which reflects the Japanese philosophy and belief that “less is more”. In medieval times (1185 to 1603), bonsai became accessible to people of all social classes. The increased demand meant that more people had to learn the art of bonsai, and soon miniature trees were commonplace in almost every Japanese home.

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Retired IPS officer complains about the theft of rare bonsai plant from his home https://rgbonsai.com/retired-ips-officer-complains-about-the-theft-of-rare-bonsai-plant-from-his-home/ Tue, 12 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/retired-ips-officer-complains-about-the-theft-of-rare-bonsai-plant-from-his-home/ The 15-year-old miniature tree was reportedly stolen from the home of retired DGP V Appa Rao A bonsai plant was reportedly stolen from the residence in Jubilee Hills of retired IPS agent V Appa Rao. Rao’s wife Sridevi has filed a complaint that among their vast collection of bonsai in their garden, a 15-year-old Saru […]]]>

The 15-year-old miniature tree was reportedly stolen from the home of retired DGP V Appa Rao

A bonsai plant was reportedly stolen from the residence in Jubilee Hills of retired IPS agent V Appa Rao. Rao’s wife Sridevi has filed a complaint that among their vast collection of bonsai in their garden, a 15-year-old Saru Casuarina bonsai was found missing by their gardener. The police filed an FIR under section 379 of the IPC and began to investigate the complaint.

The complaint filed by Rao’s wife V Sridevi says the bonsai tree that was placed near the southeast door of the house was there when their gardener, Devender, watered the plants three days ago, but was found missing when he searched for it. The bonsai is said to have disappeared on Sunday and the complaint was lodged with Jubilee Hills Police on Monday.

The residence has two CCTV cameras, but both have apparently not been functioning for several months now. The police are investigating the complaint by questioning residents of the neighborhood.

According to reports, another bonsai plant, a jade variety, was stolen from the same residence. Bonsai is a Japanese art of growing miniature trees in shallow trays and is usually expensive because it takes time and effort to grow into a well-formed tree. Saru Casuarina is a kind of Australian pine and is often used in bonsai making because of its sturdy stems and long, pointed foliage. The cost of bonsai often depends on its age and the quality of its form.

Appa Rao had served as a DGP in undivided Andhra Pradesh and had retired over 20 years ago.

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Lord of the Little Things: Growing One Bonsai at a Time | News from Meerut https://rgbonsai.com/lord-of-the-little-things-growing-one-bonsai-at-a-time-news-from-meerut/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/lord-of-the-little-things-growing-one-bonsai-at-a-time-news-from-meerut/ MEERUT: For this close-knit urban group, Bonsai is more than just growing miniature plants. What started as a simple pastime for an individual has now turned into a kind of meditation for the whole group, which teaches the value of patience and the flow of life. The term bonsai suggests growing trained trees in small […]]]>
MEERUT: For this close-knit urban group, Bonsai is more than just growing miniature plants. What started as a simple pastime for an individual has now turned into a kind of meditation for the whole group, which teaches the value of patience and the flow of life.
The term bonsai suggests growing trained trees in small containers. For this group of doctors, teachers and housewives, it’s about patiently and dedicatedly cultivating miniature wonders in their own backyards. This includes jade, ficus, jamun, candle tree and others. Bonsai cultivation has become an inseparable part of their life for them.
Dr Shanti Swarup, practicing surgeon and certified bonsai artist who is the mastermind behind the group, said, “Bonsai is a living art that requires a lifelong commitment. The artist is nothing less than a monk in constant prayer. The culture has its roots in China where people began to erect trees 2,000 years ago. Called Penjing, these miniature trees were made as a souvenir. Later the art traveled to Japan where it was refined and became known as bonsai.
A resident of Meerut, Swarup founded the group, known as the Vanulee Study Group, several years ago and gives free bonsai lessons to around 20 students. The group meets once a month. He said, “The first thing I teach my students is patience. The hobby requires the utmost attention at every step. Since we shape trees in small containers compared to their counterparts, they require special handling. “The process begins with transplanting a small plant into shallow trays providing it with a specially designed soil mix. Then begins the bending and pruning of the branches using ancient tools and techniques. The most crucial part is wrapping the wires around the branches to reposition them. Care must be taken not to let the wires dig into the branches as this will leave marks. They must be removed in good time. Wiring is to a bonsai artist what a brush is to a painter. The whole process takes years. The ultimate goal is to shape the tree into its most natural yet miniature form,” he added.
Swarup has nearly 200 bonsai trees in his Defense Colony home and devotes 2-3 hours a day to maintaining them.
One of his students, Deepti Agarwal, who joined his study group about eight years ago, said: “There was a big neglected lawn here and as a housewife I started to interested in its development. It was then that I met Dr. Swarup who encouraged me to pursue art. Her meticulous way of teaching helped me learn quickly. I have 50 plants in my house now.
Another student, Supriya Sondhi, 58, said: “I joined it ten years ago. Although he is strict, he is also the best teacher. Today, I have a hundred Bonsai that adorn my house.
Revealing the origin of his passion, Swarup recalls: “It all started in the mid-80s when I was pursuing post-graduate studies in surgery at Jhansi Medical College. I heard about this new concept of raising trees on shallow plateaus. I managed to buy a book from an old bookstore for Rs 60 and it became my Bonsai Bible. Since then, I’ve been constantly learning the art, developing it, and even helping others master it.
He summarizes: “It’s like a micro-surgery at home but the duration is long, very long.”
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This Kumta Tree Maker Has Hundreds of Bonsai Beauties – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection. Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a […]]]>

Express press service

KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection.

Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a philosophy, of nature itself. Bonsai is the art of growing miniature trees in pots, where the plants take on the shape and scale of a full-sized tree. This art was developed by the Japanese. People, especially those who face a lack of space in their homes and cannot grow large trees like the banyan tree, have opted for bonsai trees which can be grown in small pots on their patios, outdoors. inside or outside their homes, or even on the stairs. These bonsai trees can be kept alive for over a hundred years. There are those that are over 1,000 years old in the world.

Lakshminarayana R Hegde, 62, the rangeland forest officer, retired from the forest service about four years ago. Before that, he had planned to spend his retirement life setting up a small bonsai garden in his home. And since then, he began to soak up information about growing bonsai in order to fulfill his dream.

After his retirement, he settled in his village of Kallabbe, located about 11 km from the town of Kumta, Uttara Kannada. Next to his house, on a small plot, he developed a bonsai garden named “Kubjavruksha Kalaniketana”. The garden has 36 types of more than 220 bonsai trees.

Hegde says many people dream of having their own garden or a plantation of tall trees near their house. Due to a space problem, they are forced to give up. “Therefore, I decided to use my knowledge of tree conservation that I acquired during my service as a forest officer and educate people on how to grow bonsai at home. Keeping green in and around the house is also good for people and nature,” he says.

He also leads workshops in schools and colleges on the different techniques. ), apart from the cultivation of medicinal and commercial plants. He suggests people grow bonsai according to their zodiac sign as it is widely believed that it will give them good health.

In his garden, the miniature trees have formal and informal shapes, vertical, inclined, etc. Some trees look like groves and others cascade. He gave his trees the shape of a heart, an animal, a human, Lord Ganesha, etc. Most of them are banyan trees. After collecting trees from various places, such as old buildings or forest areas, he cuts the roots and branches to shape them. Over a period of time, the bonsai grows in shape and attracts people. There is a huge market for these trees.
He believes bonsai cultivation is not just a science, it’s an art. “We have to provide water, fertilizer and follow the scientific growth of the trees. At the same time, you can shape trees, so it’s an art,” he says.

MAKING PANS
Hegde does not buy the necessary pots for growing bonsai. He makes his own pots using household items like a bucket, containers, and sometimes cement. He says he hardly invests in any hardware. Its pots vary in shapes like round, square, triangle, hexagon, a boat, etc. He says he must spend a lot of money if he had to buy such different shaped pots and carry them home.

BECOMING ORGANIC
Kallabbe is surrounded by forests in the Western Ghats. This is why Hegde collects the dry leaves and prepares organic fertilizers. He did not use any chemical fertilizers for the bonsai. He advocates organic fertilizers because they give lasting strength to any plant. He spends about 4 hours a day to make and maintain his garden.

HIS COLLECTION
Some bonsai garden trees Calotropis procera, Ficus religiosa, Achyranthes aspera, Ficus racemosa, Butea monosperma, Acacia catechu, Cynodon dactylon, Prosopis cenneraria, Imperata cylindrica

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Maine Gardener: Bonsai Requires Patience and Skill https://rgbonsai.com/maine-gardener-bonsai-requires-patience-and-skill/ Sun, 13 Dec 2015 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/maine-gardener-bonsai-requires-patience-and-skill/ Bonsai cultivation is complicated. It can take six years or more to create a bonsai from a tree purchased from a nursery or scavenged from the wild. But after all this work and time, some trees grow and die for no apparent reason. In bonsai, an art originating in China over 1,000 years ago, trees […]]]>

Bonsai cultivation is complicated. It can take six years or more to create a bonsai from a tree purchased from a nursery or scavenged from the wild. But after all this work and time, some trees grow and die for no apparent reason.

In bonsai, an art originating in China over 1,000 years ago, trees that normally grow up to 100 feet tall are pruned and trained to grow in a container to a height of about 1 foot. These very neat miniature trees can sell for thousands of dollars.

Colin Lewis has written several bonsai books, judges national shows and is the owner of the Ho Yoku School of Bonsai in Biddeford Pool. He views his bonsai trees as works of art, not just dwarf plants, and his are valued that way as well.

“What you see at garden centers, fairs and malls is to bonsai what cartoon greeting cards are to fine art,” he said. He showed me a 6 inch pine he had just sold for $325.

Lewis works with temperate plants – any that can survive outdoors in Maine’s climate – although he protects most of his bonsai trees in an unheated greenhouse or unheated garage during the winter. Native plants that work particularly well are red spruce, balsam fir and tamaracks, he said, adding that tamaracks are now all the rage.

Bonsai is an art form for the patient gardener. Lewis has a potted yew in his garage that he took – with his permission – from a Kennebunkport lawn three years ago. Now that the yew has finally acclimated to its pot, it will spend the next three years training, pruning branches and pruning roots to create a bonsai tree.

The most important part in plant breeding is the trunk, Lewis said. With deciduous plants, he can cut off all the leaves and branches and new branches will sprout, which he can then form.

If he cuts all the branches from an evergreen, it will die, so he must instead shape some of the existing branches. Sometimes he will cut a branch almost completely to shape it. More than that, he said, and the tree would die.

Lewis has a hornbeam bonsai that was 6 feet tall when he brought it home. He cut the branches, hollowed out the trunk to make it look like it had been struck by lightning, and formed it into a striking little tree 12 inches tall.

Timing is everything, Lewis said. With a larch, there are only two weeks a year where you can prune the roots without killing the plant. For other varieties, he can prune the roots for four to six weeks.

You can reach Lewis, an Englishman who moved to the United States in 2001, at colinlewisbonsai.com.

Ernie Glabau of Entwood Bonsai in Burnham has been growing and selling bonsai trees since the 1990s. He is at the other end of the bonsai spectrum.

About 70% of the plants he works with are tropical, which won’t survive Maine’s winters, but can be displayed indoors year-round.

The tropical plants he most often uses to create bonsai are jade plants and ficus, temperate plants are pines and junipers. He typically charges $20 to $25 for his bonsai, he said, selling some on his farm but most of it at fairs and craft shows across the state.

In his experience, most people who have some sensitivity towards plants and are willing to read a little can deal with bonsai. But they have to expect some plants to die. “Anyone who grows bonsai gets used to killing a tree once in a while,” Glabau said.

Find information about Entwood Bonsai at uniquemainefarms.com/uniquemainefarms.com/Entwood_Bonsai.html.

Sue Howard from Scarborough has been taking lessons from Lewis and has been growing bonsai for about three years. She had scheduled an organizational meeting to form a bonsai club for today. But she canceled the meeting a few days ago for lack of response. She asked bonsai enthusiasts reading this story who are interested in forming a club to get in touch: [email protected] Lewis, for his part, hopes they will. A local club, he said, could bring more interest to what he sees as an underrated art form.

Tom Atwell has been writing the Maine Gardener column since 2004. He is a freelance writer who gardens in Cape Elizabeth and can be reached at 767-2297 or [email protected].


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