small trees http://rgbonsai.com/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 04:06:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rgbonsai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png small trees http://rgbonsai.com/ 32 32 Master Gardener: Pomegranates, the Ancient Snack https://rgbonsai.com/master-gardener-pomegranates-the-ancient-snack/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 06:27:08 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/master-gardener-pomegranates-the-ancient-snack/ February 9—Pomegranates are an exotic fruit that dates back to ancient times. In Persia they were used as a carpet dye and in India they were considered a symbol of fertility, probably because the fruit is filled with hundreds of small fruits inside the membrane. In fact, the scientific name, Punica granatum, translates to “seeded […]]]>

February 9—Pomegranates are an exotic fruit that dates back to ancient times. In Persia they were used as a carpet dye and in India they were considered a symbol of fertility, probably because the fruit is filled with hundreds of small fruits inside the membrane. In fact, the scientific name, Punica granatum, translates to “seeded apple”, the name given to the fruit in the Middle Ages. Spanish settlers and missionaries brought pomegranates to California.

Pomegranates make an excellent ornamental landscape tree in the San Joaquin Valley. They are very heat tolerant and can survive in alkaline soils which would kill many plants. They have many uses, such as hedges, shade trees, fruit trees, potted plants, and even bonsai. There are many cultivars to choose from, whether you need them for a container or a full-sized tree. What if you don’t want to deal with fruit? They have that covered too. There are beautiful pomegranates with double flowers that do not fruit.

Standard pomegranates form round deciduous shrubs or multi-branched trees up to 20 feet tall. While the proven varieties are ‘Wonderful’ and ‘Granada’, there are now many new varieties for sale that are marketed as ‘seedless’ or ‘soft-seeded’. Although they still have seeds, they are very soft and edible. The new varieties should be available at your favorite nursery. If not, ask them to order them for you. The University of California for Agriculture and Natural Resources has a pomegranate resource page, with a list of suggested varieties for the backyard orchard here: https://homeorchard.ucanr.edu/Fruits_&_Nuts/Pomegranate/

Dwarf pomegranates make excellent container plants and can be used as bonsai trees. There are several varieties, such as ‘Chico’, which are unsuccessful. ‘Nana’ and ‘Purple Sunset’ will bear small fruits that can be used in many arts and crafts projects.

Non-fruiting pomegranate varieties are ‘California Sunset’ with double coral flowers, ‘Toyosho’ with double peach flowers, and ‘Noshi Shibari’ with double white flowers. These are all very showy, and because they don’t set fruit, the flowering time is much longer. I have California Sunset, and I must add that the flowers are huge and the hummingbirds love it.

Plant pomegranates in the warmest, sunniest location for the best, sweetest fruit, but they will also survive partial shade. New trees should be cut to a foot tall when they are about two feet tall. From this point, allow 4-5 shoots to develop, which should be evenly distributed around the short trunk to keep the tree well balanced. Since the fruits are only borne at the tips of new shoots, it is recommended to shorten the branches every year for the first 3 years. This will encourage the maximum number of new growth from all sides and help develop a strong framed tree. After the third year, only suckers and dead branches are removed.

New trees need enough water to establish themselves. Regular watering promotes fruit development and reduces thorns. Mature trees only need to be watered once every 2-3 weeks during the summer, and if it rains in the winter, there is no need to water at all during the winter. The flowers develop on new shoots each spring and the fruits ripen in the fall.

Pomegranates have the usual problems with aphids, whiteflies and mealy bugs; however, lady beetles and predatory lacewings also lay their eggs on the leaves, helping to control these pests. A moth called the omnivorous leaf roller may be a pest in our area. The larvae feed on the crust, causing damage. After entering the fruit, they feed on the seeds until pupation. Weed control can reduce the insect population, and spraying with Bacillus thuringiensis (a biological pesticide that targets worms) also helps. Fortunately, there is usually enough fruit for both the home gardener and the moth to enjoy.

Pomegranate is self pollinated as well as insect pollinated. Cross-pollination increases fruit set, so encourage any birds, bees and butterflies that are attracted to these bright scarlet flowers by not spraying pesticides unless absolutely necessary.

So this is it. Large ornamental small trees that like the sun and the heat, have scarlet flowers to attract birds in summer, and autumn colors and fruits in addition.

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Master Gardener: Pomegranates, the ancient snack | Food and cooking https://rgbonsai.com/master-gardener-pomegranates-the-ancient-snack-food-and-cooking/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 17:09:49 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/master-gardener-pomegranates-the-ancient-snack-food-and-cooking/ The pomegranate is an exotic fruit that dates back to antiquity. In Persia they were used as a carpet dye and in India they were considered a symbol of fertility, probably because the fruit is filled with hundreds of small fruits inside the membrane. In fact, the scientific name, Punica granatum, translates to “seeded apple”, […]]]>

The pomegranate is an exotic fruit that dates back to antiquity. In Persia they were used as a carpet dye and in India they were considered a symbol of fertility, probably because the fruit is filled with hundreds of small fruits inside the membrane. In fact, the scientific name, Punica granatum, translates to “seeded apple”, the name given to the fruit in the Middle Ages. Spanish settlers and missionaries brought pomegranates to California.

Pomegranates make an excellent ornamental landscape tree in the San Joaquin Valley. They are very heat tolerant and can survive in alkaline soils which would kill many plants. They have many uses, such as hedges, shade trees, fruit trees, potted plants, and even bonsai. There are many cultivars to choose from, whether you need them for a container or a full-sized tree. What if you don’t want to deal with fruit? They have that covered too. There are beautiful pomegranates with double flowers that do not fruit.

Standard grenades form round shrubs deciduous or multi-branch trees up to 20 feet tall. While the varieties tested are “Wonderful” and “Granada”, there are now many new varieties for sale that are marketed as “seedless” or “soft seeds.” Although they still seeds, they are very soft and edible. The new varieties should be available in your favorite nursery. If it does not, ask them to order it for you. The University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources has a page of resources on the grenade, with a list of varieties suggested for backyard orchard here: https://homeorchard.ucanr.edu/Fruits_&_Nuts/Pomegranate/

Dwarf pomegranates make excellent container plants and can be used as bonsai trees. There are several varieties, such as ‘Chico’, which are unsuccessful. ‘Nana’ and ‘Purple Sunset’ will bear small fruits that can be used in many arts and crafts projects.

Non-fruiting pomegranate varieties are ‘California Sunset’ with double coral flowers, ‘Toyosho’ with double peach flowers, and ‘Noshi Shibari’ with double white flowers. These are all very showy, and because they don’t set fruit, the flowering time is much longer. I have California Sunset, and I must add that the flowers are huge and the hummingbirds love it.

Plant pomegranates in the warmest, sunniest location for the best, sweetest fruit, but they will also survive partial shade. New trees should be cut to a foot tall when they are about two feet tall. From this point, allow 4-5 shoots to develop, which should be evenly distributed around the short trunk to maintain the balance of the tree. Since the fruits are only borne at the tips of new shoots, it is recommended to shorten the branches every year for the first 3 years. This will encourage the maximum number of new growth from all sides and help develop a strong framed tree. After the third year, only suckers and dead branches are removed.

New trees need enough water to establish themselves. Regular watering promotes fruit development and reduces thorns. Mature trees only need to be watered once every 2-3 weeks during the summer, and if it rains in the winter, there is no need to water at all during the winter. The flowers develop on new shoots each spring and the fruits ripen in the fall.

Pomegranates have the usual problems with aphids, whiteflies and mealy bugs; however, lady beetles and predatory lacewings also lay their eggs on the leaves, helping to control these pests. A moth called the omnivorous leaf roller may be a pest in our area. The larvae feed on the crust, causing damage. After entering the fruit, they feed on the seeds until pupation. Weed control can reduce insect population and spraying Bacillus thuringiensis (an organic pesticide that targets worms) also helps. Fortunately, there is usually enough fruit for both the home gardener and the moth to enjoy.

Pomegranate is self pollinated as well as insect pollinated. Cross-pollination increases fruit set, so encourage any birds, bees and butterflies that are attracted to these bright scarlet flowers by not spraying pesticides unless absolutely necessary.

So this is it. Large ornamental small trees that like the sun and the heat, have scarlet flowers to attract birds in summer, and autumn colors and fruits in addition.

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Pomegranates for Ornamental Landscaping – The Sun-Gazette Newspaper https://rgbonsai.com/pomegranates-for-ornamental-landscaping-the-sun-gazette-newspaper/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/pomegranates-for-ornamental-landscaping-the-sun-gazette-newspaper/ Standard pomegranates form round deciduous shrubs or multi-branched trees up to 20 feet tall. While the proven varieties are ‘Wonderful’ and ‘Granada’, there are now many new varieties for sale that are marketed as ‘seedless’ or ‘soft-seeded’. Although they still have seeds, they are very soft and edible. The new varieties should be available at […]]]>

Standard pomegranates form round deciduous shrubs or multi-branched trees up to 20 feet tall. While the proven varieties are ‘Wonderful’ and ‘Granada’, there are now many new varieties for sale that are marketed as ‘seedless’ or ‘soft-seeded’. Although they still have seeds, they are very soft and edible. The new varieties should be available at your favorite nursery. If not, ask them to order them for you. The University of California for Agriculture and Natural Resources has a pomegranate resource page, with a list of suggested varieties for the backyard orchard here: homeorchard.ucanr.edu/Fruits_&_Nuts/Pomegranate.

Dwarf pomegranates make excellent container plants and can be used as bonsai trees. There are several varieties, such as ‘Chico’, which are unsuccessful. ‘Nana’ and ‘Purple Sunset’ will bear small fruits that can be used in many arts and crafts projects.

Non-fruiting pomegranate varieties are ‘California Sunset’ with double coral flowers, ‘Toyosho’ with double peach flowers, and ‘Noshi Shibari’ with double white flowers. These are all very showy, and because they don’t set fruit, the flowering time is much longer. I have California Sunset, and I must add that the flowers are huge and the hummingbirds love it.

Plant pomegranates in the warmest, sunniest spot for the best, sweetest fruit, but they will also survive partial shade. New trees should be cut to a foot tall when they are about two feet tall. From this point, allow four or five shoots to develop, which should be evenly distributed around the short trunk to keep the tree well balanced. Since the fruits are only borne at the tips of new shoots, it is recommended to shorten the branches every year for the first three years. This will encourage the maximum number of new growth from all sides and help develop a strong framed tree. After the third year, only suckers and dead branches are removed.

New trees need enough water to establish themselves. Regular watering promotes fruit development and reduces thorns. Mature trees only need to be watered once every two to three weeks during the summer, and if it rains in the winter, there is no need to water at all during the winter. The flowers develop on new shoots each spring and the fruits ripen in the fall.

Pomegranates have the usual problems with aphids, whiteflies and mealy bugs; however, lady beetles and predatory lacewings also lay their eggs on the leaves, helping to control these pests. A moth called the omnivorous leafroller can be a pest in our area. The larvae feed on the crust, causing damage. After entering the fruit, they feed on the seeds until pupation. Weed control can reduce the insect population, and spraying with Bacillus thuringiensis (a biological pesticide that targets worms) also helps. Fortunately, there is usually enough fruit for both the home gardener and the moth to enjoy.

Pomegranate is self pollinated as well as insect pollinated. Cross-pollination increases fruit set, so encourage any birds, bees and butterflies that are attracted to these bright scarlet flowers by not spraying pesticides unless absolutely necessary.

So this is it. Large ornamental small trees that like the sun and the heat, have scarlet flowers to attract birds in summer, and autumn colors and fruits in addition.

The Master Gardeners will be live to answer your questions on Saturday, February 19 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Visalia Farmers Market in the southwest parking lot of the Sequoia Mall in Visalia. You can also contact them at 559-684-3325, or visit their website at ucanr.edu/sites/UC_Master_Gardeners.

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An Easy Guide to Ficus Ginseng, aka Bonsai https://rgbonsai.com/an-easy-guide-to-ficus-ginseng-aka-bonsai/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/an-easy-guide-to-ficus-ginseng-aka-bonsai/ Ginseng ficus trees are tiny trees steeped in history and make great additions to your houseplant collection. If you are interested in the ancient Japanese art of bonsai, this is the perfect starter plant. It requires minimal care compared to other bonsai trees, making it a great entry-level option. You can start learning the art […]]]>

Ginseng ficus trees are tiny trees steeped in history and make great additions to your houseplant collection. If you are interested in the ancient Japanese art of bonsai, this is the perfect starter plant. It requires minimal care compared to other bonsai trees, making it a great entry-level option. You can start learning the art of bonsai and creating your own Zen garden in no time.

What is a Ficus ginseng and where does it come from?

Ficus ginseng grows in all tropical regions of the world and is native to Southeast Asia. They have narrow, raised roots with a trunk that often resembles legs. The miniature tree has tiny leaves protruding from the crown of the plant, giving it an interesting look.

The art of bonsai uses techniques of growing and training small trees. With lots of practice, root pruning, crown pruning, and root containment, Bonsai artists can create small trees that actually look like their full-size versions.

Ginseng is a Chinese word meaning roots. Thus, the Ficus ginseng is named because of its unique roots and shape. Generally, if you were to purchase one, your plant will already be quite mature as popular bonsai will need tending before their thick trunks grow.

Ficus ginseng at a glance

botanical name: Ficus ginseng, Ficus retusa and Ficus microcarpa.

Other names: Ginseng Ficus, Bonsai, Ficus Bonsai.

Height and growth rate: Adult height is 31-61cm. Slow growth.

Light: Direct sun.

watering: Water when the soil dries out slightly.

Temperature: Indoor domestic temperatures.

Pet Toxicity: Toxic to pets.

Plant parent level: Beginner level.

How to take care of your Ficus ginseng

Light

Ficus ginseng is slow growing and really depends on a good amount of light to thrive. Placing the plant on a windowsill is a great option as long as it is filled with bright, indirect light. The best place will be in a window that receives morning light. Afternoon sunlight may be too harsh on the plant.

watering

Be sure to water your plant thoroughly, but only when the soil becomes slightly dry. You don’t want to overwater your plant so it drips because it can get fungal issues that way. It’s best to keep the soil a little moist during the summer and less water during the winter months, as most of these plants will go dormant during the cooler months. Make sure your plant’s roots are not lying in water. A great way to prevent this from happening is to place the tree on a tray filled with pebbles. This will also help regulate humidity.

Temperature

Ginseng ficuses do well at normal household temperatures. You want to avoid placing them in places where there are too many drafts because a rapid change in temperature is never good for the plants. Be sure to mist your plant occasionally to ensure it gets enough moisture. However, the waxy leaves of the plant will tolerate lower humidity if you don’t have the best conditions. In the summer, you can take your plant outside if the temperature is 15 degrees Celsius or higher. As long as you keep it in the sun and make sure the soil stays moist, you should be fine.

Maintenance

When it comes to bonsai, maintenance is really important. You will need to prune your plant to create the full bonsai look. If you want your trunk to thicken, avoid pruning for a year or two. This will cause new shoots to grow from the old wood. When you’re ready to prune the plant, most people say to prune two leaves after six to eight leaves have grown. Just make sure you’re using sharp tools that have been cleaned to ensure your plant doesn’t get a disease.

When it comes to repotting, you should always check the roots first. Also, with Ficus ginseng, you really don’t need to repot it every year because it is slow growing. If it’s time to repot your plant, you will need to cut the roots of the plant. Take only a little from the lower part of the roots. This will help it settle into its new pot that you’ve filled with bonsai soil.

ficus ginseng, bonsai

sochaGetty Images

ficus ginseng in a pot on a yellow background

RammannGetty Images

Common problems with a Ficus ginseng plant (and how to fix them):

Falling leaves: The ficus ginseng can lose its leaves for several reasons. It may be because they are overwatered or there is not enough moisture in the air. They may not be getting enough light or they may be in a draughty area. You really need to assess your personal situation as everyone’s homes are different. It may take a while, but you will find the perfect place to keep your bonsai.

Fungal problems: If you overwater your Ficus ginseng, you may end up with fungus. If you start to see white or black fungus or mold, there may be a more serious problem. Before you do anything, be sure to move your infected plant away from the rest of your collection so it doesn’t spread. You will then want to remove the tree from its pot. This is when you can check to see if root rot is the cause of the fungus. Anything that appears to be infected will need to be pruned. Then you will repot your tree in a clean pot with new bonsai soil. You can spray your plant with a fungicide to kill any remaining fungus.

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Make Vivid Memories in Columbus https://rgbonsai.com/make-vivid-memories-in-columbus/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/make-vivid-memories-in-columbus/ The Franklin Park Conservatory’s main glass greenhouse was first opened to the public in 1895 and was built on the original site of the Ohio State Fair. (photo by Julie Geiss) We celebrated a milestone anniversary this summer. In the blink of an eye, my oldest daughter turned 18. She wanted to meet her cousin, […]]]>
The Franklin Park Conservatory’s main glass greenhouse was first opened to the public in 1895 and was built on the original site of the Ohio State Fair. (photo by Julie Geiss)

We celebrated a milestone anniversary this summer. In the blink of an eye, my oldest daughter turned 18. She wanted to meet her cousin, who had also just turned 18, for an overnight trip somewhere in Ohio.

After considering several options, we decided to meet in Columbus. Botany and books were the themes of the trip.

Our first stop was at the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens located on Broad Street, less than two miles from downtown.

Franklin Park Conservatory is like stepping back in time to the Victorian era. The main glass greenhouse was first opened to the public in 1895 and was built on the original site of the Ohio State Fair.

In addition to the greenhouse, a lake with a boathouse and motorable trails made the 88-acre park a popular landmark for many around the turn of the century.

Kindergarten

We couldn’t resist walking around the kindergarten at first, even though technically we didn’t have any children with us. Teenage cousins ​​can still enjoy the enchantment of a kindergarten. We watched the smaller visitors enter the garden through a willow tunnel.

The 2-acre garden featured many other interactive exhibits, including a bird’s eye view of the canopy walkway located 10 feet above the garden. Native Ohio plants and animals are on display, and visitors can even enter an enlarged Cardinals’ Nest. Jump rope bridges bring adults and children alike closer to the giant multi-person hammock that is the height of excitement at 13 feet tall.

After our passage in the kindergarten, we continued outside to the Grand Mallway of the Conservatory. We had to stop several times on the way to admire the perennials that lined the sidewalk. We inspected many of the over 230 seasonal display containers featuring colorful foliage.

Paul Bussé

Our destination was the Paul Busse Garden Railroad, exhibited for the second time at the Conservatory. Paul Busse is originally from Ohio. He graduated from Ohio State University in 1972 with a degree in landscape architecture.

He started his own business that focused on building exceptional outdoor living spaces. He then moved on to building garden railroads using LGB’s g-scale model trains.

He then founded the company Applied Imagination, which brings whimsical masterpieces to life by combining landscaping with railroads. Applied Imagination’s signature look uses plant material to create “botanical architecture”.

Entire displays are made with natural materials like sticks, birch bark and lotus pods. Smaller details are added with materials like pine cones, acorns, and seeds.

We were mesmerized as soon as we walked by the Paul Busse Garden Railroad exhibit: 1,122 feet of track wrapped around four smaller themed areas like FairyTale Land and Wild West Town. Several different G-scale model trains made their way along the track around miniature waterfalls, a water tower, and even the Three Little Pigs houses.

Three biomes

Once we hit the heat of the day, we decided to head inside the conservatory building. The conservatory is divided into three different biomes.

We walked through the conifers and deciduous trees of the Himalayan mountain biome. Next, we walked across the canopy bridge into the rainforest wetland biome.

Finally, we admired the cacti and succulents inside the desert biome. Loved watching all the small trees in the bonsai yard up close. A tree was 365 years old. We were greeted by a flock of brightly feathered flamingos, created by adding annual flowers to the metal structures.

Throughout the veranda, colorful glass art pieces created by Dale Chihuly were prominently displayed. The shiny glass breathtakingly accented the natural plants and flowers.

After admiring all the different exhibits on display, we headed to The Book Loft of German Village, which is best described as a maze of books. Several stairs and small corridors later, we got lost in the 32 book rooms.

Our destination for dinner was the newly renovated Budd Dairy Co. Food Hall located in the Italian village of Fourth Street. The Budd Dairy Company boasted of having the country’s only sanitary refrigerated milk wagon in 1914 and was later the first company in the United States to use electric vehicles for milk delivery.

The building, first constructed in 1914 as a modern milk bottling plant, now houses 10 different kitchens that are part of the Cameron Mitchell restaurants. I generally feel more comfortable in the countryside or on nature trails, but I certainly cherished our time in Columbus.

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Surveillance video captures thieves stealing bonsai trees from St. Paul’s house – WCCO https://rgbonsai.com/surveillance-video-captures-thieves-stealing-bonsai-trees-from-st-pauls-house-wcco/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/surveillance-video-captures-thieves-stealing-bonsai-trees-from-st-pauls-house-wcco/ MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A St. Paul couple are asking for the community’s help in identifying the thieves who stole a number of their bonsai trees over the weekend. The couple, who do not wish to be named, say the trees were stolen from an exhibit outside their home in the West 7th Street neighborhood. The […]]]>

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A St. Paul couple are asking for the community’s help in identifying the thieves who stole a number of their bonsai trees over the weekend.

The couple, who do not wish to be named, say the trees were stolen from an exhibit outside their home in the West 7th Street neighborhood. The thieves took several of the meticulously grown small trees outside, even though they were drilled into a bench and lit by spotlights.

The owners estimate the loss at thousands of dollars. One of them has been working with bonsai for about five years.

(credit: CBS)

The first theft happened two weeks ago, when one of the largest trees was stolen. After that, the owners tied and bolted the remaining trees to the show bench. They originally planned to put a fence around the screen, but cost became an issue.

Early Saturday, surveillance video captured three people stealing several of the remaining trees. The video shows the thieves apparently pulling up in a van and, within three minutes, they were cutting through the strips holding down the trees and fleeing with at least half a dozen plants. In their back and forth to put the plants in the van, one of the thieves trips over a lawn mower.

The couple have shared surveillance video on social media and are asking anyone who recognizes the thieves to come forward. The owners say they have filed a report with St. Paul police. WCCO-TV is working to verify this.

Bonsai is an ancient art form practiced in Japan since the 6th century. It usually features trees or shrubs grown in small containers, and growers spend hours cutting, wiring, and fertilizing the plants to create a unique living display.

(credit: CBS)

Nicholas Ehlers, outreach director for the Minnesota Bonsai Society, said while a new plant from a nursery might cost $10 to $50, a quality tree, like those on display at the Como Zoo and Conservatory, might cost hundreds or thousands. .

“Even if it’s not show quality, you still have to put in hours of watering and tending to the trees to get them to this point, which can take years,” he said. -he declares.

While Ehlers says bonsai thefts don’t happen often in Minnesota, it has happened in the past.

“We are very careful with the information we give out about members for this exact reason,” he said.

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Alameda bonsai expert on the resurgence of horticultural art https://rgbonsai.com/alameda-bonsai-expert-on-the-resurgence-of-horticultural-art/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/alameda-bonsai-expert-on-the-resurgence-of-horticultural-art/ Alameda’s Jonas Dupuich is a giant in the bonsai world – he teaches and lectures and runs the popular blog Bonsai Tonight, and his book, “The Little Book of Bonsai”, was published last year by Ten Speed Press. Podcasts are his new project. As interest in bonsai increased during the pandemic, he branched out into […]]]>

Alameda’s Jonas Dupuich is a giant in the bonsai world – he teaches and lectures and runs the popular blog Bonsai Tonight, and his book, “The Little Book of Bonsai”, was published last year by Ten Speed Press. Podcasts are his new project. As interest in bonsai increased during the pandemic, he branched out into this medium. We spoke with him about the art of growing small and how those who admire bonsai can grow from hobbyist to grower.

Q How would you describe bonsai to someone unfamiliar with this garden art?

A “Bonsai,” which translates to “tray planting” in Japanese, refers to the practice of growing small trees in containers that evoke larger trees in nature.

Q How did you come to bonsai?

A After college I was working in the family business, Encinal Nursery in Alameda, when I met a bonsai teacher from Hayward named Boon Manakitivipart, who over the next few years became one of the most prominent teachers in the country. I studied with Boon for over 20 years.

Q Why are we seeing a resurgence of interest in bonsai today?

A Bonsai is a great alternative to our increasingly digital culture that allows people to embrace their horticultural and artistic side.

Q What qualities do you need to become a good bonsai grower? Let’s say someone has a good eye for design but has never had a green thumb. Would this person be a candidate?

A The most successful bonsai growers care deeply about their trees and are always curious about how they can increase the beauty of a bonsai while maintaining its health. It’s not hard to learn the basics of horticulture, but you can spend years honing your technique or artistic sensibility.

Q How much does it cost to get into bonsai?

A Getting started can be as simple as picking up an inexpensive tree for $20 to $50 at a garden center and pruning it to your liking. Your local state park is one of the best places to study tree growth in your area. Take note of which species thrive, if you are looking for species to train into bonsai. If you have an outdoor space, a juniper is ideal.

Q What kind of time commitment is involved?

A As little as a few minutes a day. Most trees require regular watering and seasonal pruning.

Q Can you keep a bonsai indoors?

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This Kumta Tree Maker Has Hundreds of Bonsai Beauties – The New Indian Express https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-kumta-tree-maker-has-hundreds-of-bonsai-beauties-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection. Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a […]]]>

Express press service

KUMTA: He’s not looking at the trees, he’s looking down. A retired forestry officer, who had mastered the art of “bonsai” cultivation techniques, experimented and educated people about environmental protection.

Caring for small trees takes skill and patience. The growers treat the trees with love and care. Pot-grown mini wonders represent a philosophy, of nature itself. Bonsai is the art of growing miniature trees in pots, where the plants take on the shape and scale of a full-sized tree. This art was developed by the Japanese. People, especially those who face a lack of space in their homes and cannot grow large trees like the banyan tree, have opted for bonsai trees which can be grown in small pots on their patios, outdoors. inside or outside their homes, or even on the stairs. These bonsai trees can be kept alive for over a hundred years. There are those that are over 1,000 years old in the world.

Lakshminarayana R Hegde, 62, the rangeland forest officer, retired from the forest service about four years ago. Before that, he had planned to spend his retirement life setting up a small bonsai garden in his home. And since then, he began to soak up information about growing bonsai in order to fulfill his dream.

After his retirement, he settled in his village of Kallabbe, located about 11 km from the town of Kumta, Uttara Kannada. Next to his house, on a small plot, he developed a bonsai garden named “Kubjavruksha Kalaniketana”. The garden has 36 types of more than 220 bonsai trees.

Hegde says many people dream of having their own garden or a plantation of tall trees near their house. Due to a space problem, they are forced to give up. “Therefore, I decided to use my knowledge of tree conservation that I acquired during my service as a forest officer and educate people on how to grow bonsai at home. Keeping green in and around the house is also good for people and nature,” he says.

He also leads workshops in schools and colleges on the different techniques. ), apart from the cultivation of medicinal and commercial plants. He suggests people grow bonsai according to their zodiac sign as it is widely believed that it will give them good health.

In his garden, the miniature trees have formal and informal shapes, vertical, inclined, etc. Some trees look like groves and others cascade. He gave his trees the shape of a heart, an animal, a human, Lord Ganesha, etc. Most of them are banyan trees. After collecting trees from various places, such as old buildings or forest areas, he cuts the roots and branches to shape them. Over a period of time, the bonsai grows in shape and attracts people. There is a huge market for these trees.
He believes bonsai cultivation is not just a science, it’s an art. “We have to provide water, fertilizer and follow the scientific growth of the trees. At the same time, you can shape trees, so it’s an art,” he says.

MAKING PANS
Hegde does not buy the necessary pots for growing bonsai. He makes his own pots using household items like a bucket, containers, and sometimes cement. He says he hardly invests in any hardware. Its pots vary in shapes like round, square, triangle, hexagon, a boat, etc. He says he must spend a lot of money if he had to buy such different shaped pots and carry them home.

BECOMING ORGANIC
Kallabbe is surrounded by forests in the Western Ghats. This is why Hegde collects the dry leaves and prepares organic fertilizers. He did not use any chemical fertilizers for the bonsai. He advocates organic fertilizers because they give lasting strength to any plant. He spends about 4 hours a day to make and maintain his garden.

HIS COLLECTION
Some bonsai garden trees Calotropis procera, Ficus religiosa, Achyranthes aspera, Ficus racemosa, Butea monosperma, Acacia catechu, Cynodon dactylon, Prosopis cenneraria, Imperata cylindrica

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This bonsai enthusiast has quintupled his agricultural investments https://rgbonsai.com/this-bonsai-enthusiast-has-quintupled-his-agricultural-investments/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/this-bonsai-enthusiast-has-quintupled-his-agricultural-investments/ They say being a farmer is hard work. It’s not a career that allows you to retire early and comfortably, especially in today’s u.a predictable economy where lower-class workers are always the first to be affected when “change” occurs. It is generally difficult for people in agricultural jobs to climb out of poverty and hardship […]]]>

They say being a farmer is hard work.

It’s not a career that allows you to retire early and comfortably, especially in today’s u.a predictable economy where lower-class workers are always the first to be affected when “change” occurs.

It is generally difficult for people in agricultural jobs to climb out of poverty and hardship – but this the guy is an exception.

Edwin Dela Cruz was content with his casual work as a farmer, harvesting and selling his crops at a local market in his province, Nueva Ecijia.

Then, in early 2011, his longtime friend contacted him and asked to join a Facebook group called “South Nueva Ecija Bonsai Lovers”. As the name suggests, the group is made up of people who all have the same interest in making bonsai.

He was initially skeptical about it as a hobby, but after seeing people buy and sell their homemade bonsai and make huge profits from it, he decided to give it a try.

Since he had already gHaving a strong knowledge of growing organic plants and crops, he decided to turn it into a business venture which turned out to be very profitable. In fact, he multiplied his profits by five times his business capital!

Small trees make a lot of money

Before starting his own business in the bonsai community, he only wanted to have one in his house.

He searched the markets for the most affordable bonsai trees only to find that each one came at an incredibly high price.

This prompted him to make his own bonsai. And thanks to the Facebook group his friend introduced him to, he learned the basics of creating a bonsai tree.

Image credit: http://nicerioadventures.blogspot.com

Dela Cruz said that in the group, other bonsai enthusiasts organize occasional trips to local rainforests to conserve and collect runoff trunks such as bantige, carmona, banyan tree and much more. These plants were then used as materials to create their pro-environment bonsai projects.

“We would go to places like Aurora or General Tinio and find these materials by the rivers,” he said.

However, some bonsai enthusiasts do not have the luxury of searching the wilderness for solitary trunks.

But Dela Cruz says that’s never been a problem because some vendors in the group offer them runoff trunks they picked up on their patrol. In addition to this, they also engage in the exchange of essential materials for making a beautiful bonsai.

Some of these materials even come from distant provinces like Koronadal or Ilocos.

According to him, some materials like Bluebell only come from Mindanao. Meanwhile, the dwarf lemon, bantigeand Pine Tree materials usually come from Ilocos.

bonsai
Image credit: http://www.entrepreneur.com.ph

“Some of the materials are for sale at PHP700 to PHP900. Once you finish making the tree, you can sell it for as little as Php2,000 after three months of cultivation,” Dela Cruz said.

“Rare trees like a four-month-old child bantige can go up to 7,000 PHP.

He added that for a meager capital of PHP 700-2,000, the return on investment (ROI) was still a bargain. As for growing and caring for a one-year-old bonsai, it can already be sold after three to five months.

“Sometimes for just Php500 capital for materials, you can sell your bonsai for Php5,000,” he said.

Dela Cruz revealed that one of the best sales he had in the business was Php25,000 for a pot of bantige which has been aged for two years and more.

He also said that most of his buyers prefer buying bulk orders.

During busier days, his sales rounded to nearly 18 to 36 pieces per month; but in slower months he has the chance to sell more than 6 pieces.

Encourage the Bonsai community

Since 2011, it has manufactured and housed over 700 different types of bonsai.

Of these, he sold 200 to other enthusiasts. He takes care of the others and adds them to his growing collection.

Dela Cruz added that it’s important to have a support group for your hobby, and added that criticism and advice are essential in creating a bonsai in order to avoid fatal mistakes (literally). and kill the tree.

“I upload photos of my bonsai to the group. I make sure to include shots from all angles, from the base, to the trunk, to the top. I always ask them for their opinion on how I can improve it and the members always give me their honest feedback,” he said.

bonsai
Image credit: http://www.gmanetwork.com

But apart from giving advice and opinions, these Facebook groups also organize seminars and conferences from experts who have traveled to several countries like Taiwan, Japan and other Asian countries for the development of bonsai.

“A good bonsai maker should always strive to improve. That’s why I read and try to learn new techniques. I read books, watch these lectures, and consult with other bonsai makers,” said he declared.

He has also participated in and won many bonsai making competitions in the country, including the 7th Bonsai Competition in Nueva Ecija, where he was named champion.

“If you get exposure and win contests, you can raise the price of your designs,” he added.

People and bonsai enthusiasts flock to Dela Cruz for his creations, but he manages the traffic by posting his prices online for his low-to-mid-range creations.

When it comes to pricing his premium bonsai trees, he prefers to send personal messages to potential buyers for the price list.

Passion is the key

Although he earns a nice figure in his company, he does not consider what he does as “work”. For him, caring for and creating bonsai from scratch is a hobby worth all his time.

“I really enjoy doing that. Seeing them and taking care of them is very relaxing for me. It’s like therapy,” he said.

bonsai
Image Credit: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net

He even makes the effort to get up early at 5 a.m. to water his creations, go to the market, and then leave to take care of his plants to make sure everything is in perfect condition.

“The first quality you must possess to succeed in this profession is patience. It takes a lot of effort and days, but it’s worth it in the end.

Featured Image Credit: entrepreneur.ph

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Making the art of bonsai attractive to millennials https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://rgbonsai.com/making-the-art-of-bonsai-attractive-to-millennials/ When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”. But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old […]]]>

When you think of the things people do in their 20s and 30s, bonsai doesn’t necessarily come to mind. Unless you grew up in the days of the “Karate Kid”.

But Aarin Packard wants to change that. He is the curator of Pacific Bonsai Museum at Federal Way, and it’s about a 35 year old man who has been fascinated by bonsai since he was 18.

“Bonsai is the art of growing [a tree] in a container and miniaturizing it by pruning it to look like a mature tree growing in nature, ”Packard said. “Corn [the intention is to] also exude an artistic quality beyond what you would normally see in a natural, wild tree.

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Packard says the art of gardening is often seen as a hobby someone’s grandfather would do, or of particular interest to people who study and appreciate Asian culture. But he wants people to see small trees like him, where nature meets art.

“We don’t really need more bonsai practitioners, we need more bonsai enthusiasts,” he said. “I approach bonsai much more as an art than a craft and I try to instill in people an appreciation for these trees.”

Modern bonsai

His latest effort to make natural art more accessible to younger people was a six-month exhibition called Decked Out. He paired 16 of the museum’s bonsai trees with skateboards painted by local graffiti artists, including women and people of color.

“The idea was to replace the traditional Japanese scroll that we used in Japan to display it with our bonsai to create a theme, setting or location,” Packard said. “But instead of having that vertical artistic image depicted on a traditional roller, use a skateboard.”

Packard has been its curator for two years. So far, his efforts have paid off.

“We have had a 25% increase in our visits so far this year to date,” he said. “I certainly see a much wider range of visitors coming. A lot more tattoos are appearing in the collection which is a good thing.

Packard says bonsai arrived in the United States after World War II, when soldiers deployed to Japan returned to the United States with a new interest in Japanese culture. He thinks the key to engaging young people is to modernize the approach to the subject. After so many years of studying and practicing this traditional art form, he believes he has earned the right to interpret it through an American lens.

“I got to the point where, OK, I’ve been there, I’ve done this,” Packard said. “Now, what can we do that is different while still respecting this traditional aspect? We don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, so to speak. We still try to maintain this art form and still try to work within the framework of what bonsai is, but make it more relevant to me living in 2016 as a 35 year old American.

“So what does it look like?” ” he added. “Ultimately it’s going to be a bit of a step back, but there have been more people who are excited about this idea of ​​where we can take this historically traditional art form and make it a lot more unique. . “

Packard is already busy planning his next exhibit, and he’s reminding people that entry to the Pacific Bonsai Museum is free.

A Bonsai-Shore pine. His age is unknown. The Bridge is an oil painting on wood titled “Surroundings” by Tehya Sullivan. (Photo courtesy of the Pacific Bonsai Museum)

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